Definition of hearing in English:

hearing

noun

  • 1mass noun The faculty of perceiving sounds.

    ‘people who have very acute hearing’
    • ‘You are no doubt familiar with the five senses: sight, touch, hearing, smell and taste.’
    • ‘At nine her sight and hearing are perfect and she has only had one day off sick in the past three years at school.’
    • ‘Most rely more on their senses of hearing, smell, and touch than on vision.’
    • ‘Her judgement and sense of hearing had been dulled by the beer.’
    • ‘They do use their potential due to their difficulty in hearing, sight or speech.’
    • ‘Now 37, his speech, eyesight, hearing and co-ordination are all badly affected.’
    • ‘They've lost their eyesight, they have acute hearing and smell, and they function perfectly in the pitch black.’
    • ‘Although suffering from poor vision, its sense of hearing and smell is acute and of primary importance in locating food.’
    • ‘She looked up and found her sight, hearing, and sense of smell had improved amazingly.’
    • ‘A crocodile's sense of smell is very acute, and its hearing is also excellent.’
    • ‘Our brain gets stimulatory inputs through the special sensory stimuli of touch, sight, hearing, smell and taste.’
    • ‘Would you loose hearing, memory, sight etc by 80 and then still live for another 35 years?’
    • ‘Alex enjoys playing ball, thanks to his keen sense of smell and his acute hearing.’
    • ‘Even if one is blessed with the senses of touch, smell, speech and hearing, it is sight that gives shape to imagination.’
    • ‘They use night vision and an acute sense of hearing to find prey in the dark.’
    • ‘In total darkness, the bird relies on its acute sense of hearing.’
    • ‘Its sight is marvellously keen, hearing exceedingly acute, and sense of smell wonderfully perfect.’
    • ‘His acute sense of hearing picked up the sound of footfalls coming towards them and he quickly ran to the others.’
    • ‘Whenever we see bats, we get quieter because they have an acute sense of hearing, and we don't want to scare them.’
    • ‘They have a keen sense of smell, acute hearing, but poor eyesight.’
    ability to hear, faculty of hearing, sense of hearing, aural faculty, auditory perception
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    1. 1.1 The range within which sounds may be heard; earshot.
      ‘she had moved out of hearing’
      • ‘These incidents may be nothing more than lack of service in a retail store or restaurant, or derogatory remarks made within their hearing.’
      • ‘I first became aware of this phenomenon in the late 70s when someone I knew sang an odd version of the first line of Killer Queen within my hearing.’
      • ‘No one ever made fun of my sister, at least within my hearing, again.’
      earshot, hearing distance, hearing range, carrying range, range of one's voice, auditory range, sound, range
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  • 2An opportunity to state one's case.

    ‘I think I had a fair hearing’
    • ‘Go ahead and follow your interests, but don't expect to get funding, a teaching position, or a fair hearing for your work.’
    • ‘For the oil companies, the Senate hearing was an opportunity to press for even greater concessions from the government.’
    • ‘But they have to be shown that it's OK for them to come in an sit down at the table and that they'll get a fair hearing.’
    • ‘The Government Administration Committee had the opportunity to hold its hearing at the Auckland War Memorial Museum.’
    • ‘They were never given a hearing or an opportunity to rebut the reasons for the cancellations as required by the regulations and the constitution.’
    • ‘At the end, both Mexico and Chile stand for a strong UN, where small nations may get a fair hearing.’
    • ‘The public hearing provided an opportunity and a faint ray of hope that encouraged women.’
    • ‘This is not just a matter of maximising access and transparency about council affairs, and providing a fair hearing to both sides of any question.’
    • ‘I urge senators of both parties to rise above the bitterness of the past, to provide a fair hearing and a prompt vote to every nominee.’
    • ‘We have got to work together as a Senate to give this qualified nominee a dignified hearing and a fair up-or-down vote.’
    • ‘In the interest of allowing each party a fair hearing at the disciplinary committee meeting, Tullow Town also declined to make a statement.’
    • ‘Not every villager believes that he was given a fair hearing, and the issue remains a conversation point on local streets.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, conservatives are bringing the push back, saying this is a nominee who ought to get a fair hearing.’
    • ‘This lot now deserve a fair hearing, and let's face it, aren't we supposed to be the nation of the ‘fair go’?’
    • ‘It is confident of a fair hearing because the council is legally bound to decide applications purely on planning law and not political grounds.’
    • ‘Perhaps the opportunity for a fair hearing of her case for her niece's custody would render the other judgments moot.’
    • ‘Allow only lefties to review books by other lefties, as righties are too opposed to their views to give them a fair hearing?’
    • ‘The Catholic minority in Northern Ireland persuaded a recent Tory Government to give them a fair hearing via PR in their local elections.’
    • ‘In these 15 years, the Apaches have not been accorded the courtesy of a fair hearing in Congress.’
    • ‘Market Hall stallholders accused developers of not giving them a fair hearing at the planning meeting in March.’
    chance to speak, opportunity to be heard, opportunity to express one's point of view, opportunity to put one's case, chance to put one's side of the story
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    1. 2.1Law An act of listening to evidence in a court of law or before an official, especially a trial before a judge without a jury.
      ‘the court may stay execution pending a hearing’
      • ‘In April, a judge at the preliminary hearing at Stockport County Court ruled the matter was not in the public interest.’
      • ‘We have no transcript of any of the relevant hearings in the County Court.’
      • ‘In the case of a continuing wrong done to him a prisoner could expect that a hearing in judicial review proceedings could be obtained with little delay.’
      • ‘There must be an active judicial hearing or trial where the court is represented by a judge or justice of the peace.’
      • ‘But a point that he made was that the judge at the hearing, the trial judge, misdirected himself to causation, and he did.’
      trial, court case, enquiry, inquest, tribunal, legal proceedings
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Pronunciation

hearing

/ˈhɪərɪŋ/