Definition of headwrap in English:



  • A strip of decorative material worn around the head by women.

    • ‘The professor, resplendent in an African-style headwrap, named ‘George Augustus Bridgewater’, the black violinist for whom Beethoven wrote his Kreutzer Sonata, as a useful role model.’
    • ‘She too looks like what we expect - like a rather severe-looking Negress, somewhere between 20 and 65, with magnificently high cheekbones, perfect skin, Badu headwrap, flaring nostrils and lips curled into a full, sensuous frown.’
    • ‘Although feathers remained, hats, headwraps and heavily-decorated headpieces helped to enhance costumes.’
    • ‘True to her stage name, Ghant is sporting a magnificently towering golden headwrap, which provides a fitting visual compliment to the size and tone color of her prodigious pipes.’
    • ‘There were 79 women, 11 with heads uncovered, the rest split between headscarves and black flowing abayas; 11 Shia turbans, 22 yashmaks, one Kurdish tribal headwrap and a sea of Western suits.’
    • ‘The hip and happening days of Acid Jazz in the late 1980s saw the brief flourishing of ‘jazz - rap’, all conscious lyrics and African headwraps, the marriage of ‘live’ jazz, DJ technique and rapped lyrics.’
    • ‘Wearing a red dress, hot pink headwrap, kente cloth, a silk fringed shawl, and an armful of bangles, she is fully sexual, a celebration of African American womanhood.’
    • ‘‘How stylish is that Pucci headwrap,’ she comments to a friend.’
    • ‘Wrap-arounds, headwraps, African prints, chocolate tones, earthy strong colours and traditional accessories that dispelled the stereotypical explosive bright colours which have become predictable summer essentials.’
    • ‘For example Ford and other students in Milwaukee are petitioning the administration to allow them to wear headwraps next year.’
    • ‘Toying with the pink headwrap that I had tied around my neck, I stared at them.’
    • ‘Author and poet asha bandele, wearing a long, black silk skirt and lavender headwrap is escorted by her young daughter, Nisa, who is four.’
    • ‘First held in 1966, the ball reflected a new ‘Black is Beautiful’ ethos that flaunted African robes, headwraps, and natural hairstyles.’