Definition of headland speech in English:

headland speech

noun

Australian
  • A speech by a political leader which sets out major policies.

    ‘in his headland speech, he tried to wipe the crisis out of the history books’
    • ‘In his first 'headland speech', he spoke broadly on the role of government.’
    • ‘He has planned a series of headland speeches to outline a range of prime ministerial visions on the economy and other key areas of policy.’
    • ‘It was, the team emphasised, a headland speech – not a detailed announcement of policy.’
    • ‘The headland speeches weren't up to much.’
    • ‘The prime minister returned to the concept of the headland speech.’
    • ‘Then followed a series of "headland speeches" in which he sought to describe his party's history, traditions and enduring values.’
    • ‘This raises for us the interesting dilemma of when does a headland speech become a swamp speech?’
    • ‘I noted with some surprise that the headland speech on defence issues criticised us for focusing on capabilities rather than intentions.’
    • ‘The view from the first headland speech was reassuring, if somewhat bland.’
    • ‘It's a headland speech that many still consider a turning point in building a more confident sense of what being Tasmanian may mean.’

Origin

1990s: from the title of several political speeches given in 1995 by John Howard when he was Federal Leader of the Opposition.