Definition of have a shy at in English:

have a shy at

phrase

dated
  • 1Try to hit something, especially with a ball or stone.

    • ‘Substitute David Mutendera needlessly had a shy at the striker's end and the resultant overthrow fetched the West Indies four valuable runs.’
    • ‘Sachin Tendulkar, the darling of cricket lovers over the years but one whose fan club has dwindled in the recent past, is the big man everybody likes to have a shy at nowadays.’
    • ‘If they miss, the man backing up collects and has a shy at the next stump along the line.’
    • ‘Pietersen has a shy at the stumps, but misses with the Australian just about making his ground.’
    • ‘Brian Lara and Ramnaresh Sarwan went for a quick run, Suresh Raina had a shy at the striker's end and the fielders turned towards square leg to appeal.’
    • ‘So good was their dominance that they did not allow the Chandigarh team to have a shy at the goal at all.’
    • ‘He seemed most happy with the chance that he has got to have a shy at the title.’
    • ‘Though Raju and Onu had a shy at the goal it was way off target and when the match looked meandering, Army XI struck.’
    • ‘I believe the lawyers are to have a shy at it.’
    • ‘Instead of having a shy at the stumps, the ball was relayed and the man was found short of ground. 114 for 5 was quite a slide from 76 / 2, but much batting was to follow in Anshu, Andrew and Anand.’
    1. 1.1archaic Attempt to do or obtain something.
      ‘have a shy at putting the case to me’
      • ‘Though he is well behind the leaders, another Finn who could have a shy at a medal at least will be hammer thrower Olli-Pekka Karjalainen.’
    2. 1.2archaic Jeer at.
      ‘you are always having a shy at Lady Ann and her relations’
      • ‘‘There you go, Polly; you are always having a shy at Lady Anne and her relations,’ says Mr. Newcome, good-naturedly.’