Main definitions of hash in English

: hash1hash2hash3

hash1

noun

  • 1A dish of cooked meat cut into small pieces and cooked again, usually with potatoes.

    • ‘Hash is a great way to use up leftover cooked meat. We tend to use roast beef, but leftover pot roast or other meats could easily be used.’
    • ‘In commercial corned beef hashes, the meat is often minced, but if you make hash at home, you can leave it in recognizable chunks.’
    • ‘Down at the Hope & Anchor restaurant in Red Hook, Brooklyn, Dianna Munz serves a barbecued-ham-and-scallion hash with two fried eggs.’
    • ‘Make a hash by frying up all the leftover roast potatoes and parsnips, adding some chopped turkey and perhaps a little leftover stuffing too.’
    • ‘Haley puts some American fries, corned beef hash, and scrambled eggs on her plate.’
    1. 1.1North American A finely chopped mixture.
      ‘a hash of raw tomatoes, chillies, and coriander’
      • ‘Its Pinot Noir reduction, sesame-shot spinach and hashed potato accompaniments seemed altogether fitting.’
    2. 1.2 A mixture of jumbled incongruous things; a mess.
      • ‘Caution threatened to descend into catatonia as, after a bright opening minute or so, the first half turned into a hash of misplaced passes, hoofs into the air and slithering ineptitude.’
      • ‘I say to members opposite that they are responsible for $100 million of wasted public money, because of their poor policy, poor lawmaking, and the continuous hashes that we have seen in this very important area of law.’
      mixture, assortment, variety, array, mixed bag, mix, miscellany, random collection, motley collection, selection, medley, melange, mishmash, hotchpotch, hodgepodge, ragbag, pot-pourri, jumble, farrago, patchwork
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verb

[with object]
  • 1Make (meat or other food) into a hash.

    • ‘It contains hashed meat, generally pork, seasoned with aromatic herbs or spices (pepper, red pepper, garlic, rosemary, thyme, cloves, ginger, nutmeg, etc.’
    • ‘In Gower they are added to hashed meat, made into pies with apples, and put into soup.’
    1. 1.1North American Chop (meat or vegetables)
      ‘hashed potatoes’
      • ‘Before dinner you may have to hash out who is going to hash the meat and potatoes.’
      • ‘Hash the meat and make it into a stuffing with raisins, stoned ripe olives and hard-boiled eggs minced fine.’
  • 2hash something outCome to agreement on something after lengthy and vigorous discussion.

    ‘they met during the day to hash out the campaign's reaction to the controversy’
    • ‘And no more side-stepping the problem, lets hash it out, here and now.’
    • ‘That's why I thought we should get together this morning and hash this thing out.’
    • ‘Before polls, phones, the internet, focus groups, etc., the only way to select a candidate was to get everyone together and hash things out.’
    • ‘They'd already hashed it out a few dozen times before, and he found it pointless to go over it again.’
    • ‘And they're listening to more and more sports radio, which guarantees that every angle will be hashed out hundreds of times before it hits the page.’
    • ‘Maybe you two should be hashing your problems out in counseling instead of drive-by ambushing an innocent bystander.’
    • ‘The truth is we'll never know for sure who would have been better, but the simple fact that party leaders are unwilling to allow its voters to hash these questions out for themselves is troubling.’
    • ‘But as they hashed it out, and they brought up the inherent problems with establishing private accounts, he instead came around to their point of view.’
    • ‘Students were encouraged to bring their ideas to the table and hash them out.’
    • ‘We finally sat down a little while ago and hashed it out.’

Phrases

  • make a hash of

    • informal Make a mess of; bungle.

      ‘he made a right hash of tearing open the envelope’
      • ‘They are making a hash of the government's plan to get the state-owned corporation into shape for eventual privatisation.’
      • ‘But what a wasted opportunity, nevertheless, if it turns out the film has made a hash of the book's lighthearted yet moving charm.’
      • ‘Some men make a hash of their relationships and careers but love their children.’
      • ‘She went back on her promise to resign and made a hash of explaining why.’
      • ‘If your only choices are to serve the requirements of your job properly and betray your ethics versus follow your ethics and make a hash of your job, surely you need a new job?’
      • ‘It seems to be impossible to implement a law against spam - unsolicited bulk email - without making a hash of it.’
      • ‘Let us take, for example, the so-called principles of the treaty, which were sent off to the judges to deal with and which, in my opinion, they have made a hash of.’
      • ‘Almost immediately the ball was dispatched downfield, but Reyna made a hash of his goal attempt and the ball sailed high over Nick Culkin's bar.’
      • ‘Sorry, I'm making a hash of this, I had this grand eloquent spiel, which has all gone to pot, cos I can't get anything to work to demonstrate what I'm talking about.’
      • ‘Damien Hindle fired in a cross which Cherry made a hash of and his palmed clearance dropped to Doni Clarke, who headed home from six yards.’
      make a mess of, bungle, botch, fluff, fumble, butcher, mess up
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  • settle someone's hash

    • informal Deal with someone in a forceful and decisive manner.

      ‘the coal merchant tried to foist boiler-nuts on us but I soon settled his hash’
      • ‘In the best of all possible worlds this despot would be unseated by the electorate; in the worst a coup might settle his hash.’
      • ‘Alphonso - that's the big buck leopard - got nasty this morning and settled his hash.’
      • ‘That would have settled his hash, and it made me feel better when I realized I could have said it.’
      • ‘The failure in the Dardanelles and the Russian collapse settled our hash in the Near East for the time being.’
      • ‘The Professor strongly suspects defamation lawyers will settle Marr 's hash.’
      • ‘I could exercise my constitutional right to firearms ownership and just go up in a tower and start shooting until a police sniper settles my hash.’

Origin

Late 16th century (as a verb): from French hacher, from hache (see hatchet).

Pronunciation

hash

/haʃ/

Main definitions of hash in English

: hash1hash2hash3

hash2

noun

informal
  • short for hashish
    • ‘After ordering our beers, he pulled out a chunk of black hash the size of an ice cube that he proceeded to slice and stuff into a big, brown pipe like one your grandfather might have smoked.’
    • ‘Cannibis, aka marijuana, hash, pot, weed, smoke, draw, call it what you will, is a drug.’
    • ‘You may have heard it called marijuana, weed or hash but it is still cannabis, a natural drug that comes from a plant.’
    • ‘Three percent of the sample indicated ever having used illicit drugs at this time; again, the most frequently cited category by far was marijuana, hash, or weed.’
    • ‘I had acquainted myself with marijuana and hash a long time before I moved to Amsterdam.’
    marijuana, hashish, bhang, hemp, kef, kif, charas, ganja, sinsemilla
    cannabis, marijuana, hashish, bhang, hemp, kef, kif, charas, ganja, sinsemilla
    View synonyms

Pronunciation

hash

/haʃ/

Main definitions of hash in English

: hash1hash2hash3

hash3

(also hash sign)

noun

British
  • The symbol #, used as a symbol on a phone keypad or computer keyboard or before a numeral (as in question #2).

    • ‘You can display hashes properly by preceding the hash with a \, which turns the hash into a hash reference, which is properly dereferenced.’
    • ‘Just click on the hash sign at the bottom of your articles and you'll have a link to the article as opposed to the site.’
    • ‘Moreover, even though a random list of Internet addresses downloading a particular file can be easily obtained, the protocol uses hashes to prevent man-in-the-middle attacks.’
    • ‘The company claims they own a patent on using a hash to identify files.’
    • ‘Also Microsoft is using the wrong symbol - the hash and sharp symbols are different typographically, albeit subtly.’
    • ‘And now Microsoft has appropriated the hash sign for its new software dev tool C#, supposedly pronounced C Sharp (as in the black key after C on the piano # denotes ‘sharp'i n musical notation) but which looks to many of us as C Hash.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, at least one of the companies being threatened, BigChampagne, claims that Altnet has no clue what they're talking about, since they don't use a hash to identify files.’
    • ‘The use of 1-way hashes to render patient records anonymous has been employed and promoted in France.’
    • ‘Re-examining indexing methods based on these constraints yielded an interesting solution: B-trees and hashes are the two most commonly used indexing methods.’

Usage

The symbol #, called hash in British English, has different names, some of them potentially confusing. In the US it is referred to as either the number sign (when used in contexts such as question #2) or the pound sign (when used as a symbol for pounds of weight, e.g. 2# of sugar). The technical name for it is octothorp

Origin

1960s: probably from hatch, altered by association with hash.

Pronunciation

hash

/haʃ/