Definition of handbasket in English:

handbasket

noun

  • A small basket carried in the hand.

    • ‘I am not the person at the health food store throwing every new superfood into my hand-basket with nary a thought of price.’
    • ‘We went prepared to fill a handbasket with a few beers, but were surprised at how many they had in stock.’
    • ‘She went into the store and stole 18 cans of infant powder formula, a handbasket and a reusable shopping bag, police said.’
    • ‘My arms hurt after carting a handbasket through this place.’
    • ‘I was lugging an overloaded handbasket down an aisle.’
    • ‘As I walked down the narrow aisle near the refrigerated section, a short and skinny young woman nearly disarmed me of my handbasket then gave me a dirty look as I tucked in the basket and turned the corner.’
    • ‘She crawled out of bed and took her son to a grocery store, where she filled a handbasket with his favorites.’
    • ‘While shopping at the supermarket I spotted this reduced-fat cheese, so I tossed it in my handbasket and headed to the checkout.’
    • ‘Half the time I couldn't even find the barcodes on the four or five items I'd be trying to buy in my hand-basket.’
    • ‘Gone are the days when I drop $75 for a mere handbasket of groceries.’

Phrases

  • go to hell in a handbasket

    • informal Deteriorate rapidly.

      ‘the world is going to hell in a handbasket’
      • ‘And if he's out falling off his bike again while the country is going to hell in a handbasket then people need to know that too.’
      • ‘Signs of a global recession inevitably conjure up thoughts of the last time the whole world went to hell in a handbasket: the Great Depression of the 1930s.’
      • ‘I found things were going to hell in a handbasket.’
      • ‘I mean the whole world is going to hell in a handbasket and everybody is just going, ‘Oh yes, but, ah, we have a new phone.’’
      • ‘I suspect that both may argue we're going to hell in a handbasket but surely for different reasons.’
      • ‘Rob, Russell, the world is going to hell in a handbasket.’
      • ‘Fitness does wonders to empower you, especially at a time when we seem to be going to hell in a handbasket.’
      • ‘I usually have little sympathy with claims that the culture is going to hell in a handbasket, but after seeing those numbers, I instinctively concluded, ‘the culture is going to hell in a handbasket.’’
      • ‘As I say in the column: if we're going to hell in a handbasket, can't we have a nicer handbasket?’
      • ‘I avenged Ellie's death, yes, but I still have to get my revenge because your life got better while mine went to hell in a handbasket.’
      • ‘As a Christian, I was used to hearing Christians whine about our godless country going to hell in a handbasket.’
      • ‘The title of this entry is taken from a witty little Ray Davis song about a newspaper letter writer who wonders why the world is going to hell in a handbasket whilst government is proclaiming ‘all is well’.’
      • ‘In any case, with the world going to hell in a handbasket, I have many more important things to worry about.’
      • ‘Once my competitors got onto our scent, things went to hell in a handbasket.’
      • ‘This entire situation is going to hell in a handbasket.’
      • ‘But the fact that some of us have had to settle for jobs less lucrative or fulfilling than we expected does not mean that the whole world is going to hell in a handbasket.’
      • ‘You know all the Democrats are going to hell in a handbasket.’
      • ‘Aging pretty much amounts to going to hell in a handbasket.’
      • ‘Look, I know the world seems like it is going to hell in a handbasket.’
      • ‘This is hardly radical stuff; both extremes believe we're going to hell in a handbasket (as extremes do), and so are likely pick on the same things as being the causes and/or symptoms of our decline and imminent destruction.’

Pronunciation

handbasket

/ˈhan(d)bɑːskɪt/