Main definitions of halt in English

: halt1halt2

halt1

verb

  • 1Bring or come to an abrupt stop.

    with object ‘there is growing pressure to halt the bloodshed’
    no object ‘she halted in mid sentence’
    • ‘But the protesters, who are increasingly determined to halt the spread of wind farms, are unconvinced.’
    • ‘Orkney had protested that the scheme - to halt livestock shipping in winds of force five or more - would disrupt transportation for months.’
    • ‘Before the flyovers were built, buses would halt at several stops on the road and this was convenient to many who lived or worked around these stops.’
    • ‘Just as in the case of the failure of deficit spending, more consumption by household will not halt recessionary pressures.’
    • ‘The whispered conversation had halted momentarily upon his abrupt arrival, but began again.’
    • ‘She had pressed the bell indicating that she wanted the bus to halt at the next stop where she would disembark.’
    • ‘As water gushes down, its speed should be checked, slowly halted and made to glide and then its absorption should be facilitated, he says.’
    • ‘Once four or five trusses have formed, pinch out the main growing stem to halt the plant's growth.’
    • ‘Because Clyde can't make it up some hills if he has to halt at certain stop signs, he has already been chastised for coming to a roll-stop by local police.’
    • ‘Thailand's Nation mass media group said Tuesday it has been pressured to halt radio and TV broadcasts of political news and commentaries.’
    • ‘This will include driving at a maximum speed of 30 kilometres an hour and dropping off and picking up passengers only after buses have halted exactly at their stops.’
    • ‘Certainly, at both sets of stalls the procession would halt, garlands would be draped over the Brahmins and political candidates, and more coconuts cracked over the rath.’
    • ‘American companies will, in the next few years, come under intense political pressure to halt the loss of jobs to India and China.’
    • ‘A last-ditch bid to halt new charges being brought in for a car park at Holland-on-Sea has been thrown out.’
    • ‘Then his fluent stride was halted when he broke the cannon bone in his right foreleg.’
    • ‘However, the introduction of the euro will halt the practice that grew up under Milosevic regime of uncontrolled money printing, Krgovic said.’
    • ‘Nobody has ever succeeded in halting the terminal decline.’
    • ‘The silence was broken as the warder hung the notices, the crowd rushed forward, blocking the road, halting the traffic, and sweeping the police aside.’
    • ‘Quite clearly, there is a job of work to be done in terms of our relationship with Indonesia to in some way check or halt this process.’
    • ‘Scorpio Rising is one rollercoaster rise that doesn't end until the album halts to a complete stop.’
    stop, come to a halt, come to a stop, come to a standstill, come to rest, pull up, draw up, stand still, draw to a stand
    cease, stop, finish, discontinue, terminate, conclude, come to an end, come to a halt, come to a stop, draw to a close, come to a standstill, be over, be abandoned
    terminate, end, stop, cease, finish, suspend, bring to a stop, bring to a close, bring to an end, put an end to, put a stop to, break off, wind up
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1in imperative Used as a military command to bring marching soldiers to a stop.
      ‘company, halt!’
      • ‘"Right, left, right, left, right, left, halt." "About face." "Forward march."’
      • ‘Company, halt!’

noun

  • 1A suspension of movement or activity, typically a temporary one.

    ‘a halt in production’
    ‘a bus screeched to a halt’
    • ‘An epiphany strikes me with the magnificent glory of a holy intervention and instantly brings my seizure to a halt.’
    • ‘This was necessary, he argues, in part because the physical and cognitive costs of trying to accommodate all the information that was produced would bring the lab to a halt.’
    • ‘When two siren-blaring ambulances screeched to a halt in front of Yashoda Superspecialities Hospitals, passers-by were alarmed.’
    • ‘York motorists were hit with road chaos, as accidents and roadworks brought traffic to a halt, and panic-buying closed a busy petrol station.’
    • ‘A police spokesman said on arrival in Valencia heavily-armed soldiers and police officers surrounded the area, bringing work at the quarries to a halt.’
    • ‘All activity drew to a halt when Mom baked her cheesecake.’
    • ‘The Humvee made a hard right and jerked to a halt.’
    • ‘I for one, would love nothing more than a general stoppage which would bring production in the country to a halt!’
    • ‘But that is apparently as close as it got before the anomalous signal brought the activities to a halt.’
    • ‘On Monday, May 17, the BSE hit the bottom circuit of 10 per cent, twice leading to a halt in trading by three hours.’
    • ‘AAF resumed production last week after closing its operation for nine months due to a halt in the supply of gas from the Arun fields.’
    • ‘Homebuilding activity, forced to a halt during the war, instead of resuming remained at a standstill.’
    • ‘Eventually, the party derails and Matty crashes to a halt.’
    • ‘While the inauguration of the mall was scheduled for 10.23 a.m., the crowd gathered an hour before bringing traffic movement to a halt.’
    • ‘After a high speed chase lasting several minutes, the car left the road and slid to a halt.’
    • ‘When a vehicle finally comes to a halt, it does so wherever the driver pleases, like a toddler falling asleep in the middle of the living-room floor.’
    • ‘But Katrina has forced production in the state to come to a halt.’
    • ‘As the breeze passed away, they came to a halt, breathing hard, straining to control the sound of their breathing.’
    • ‘Drainage activities ground almost to a halt as a result of a lack of funds.’
    • ‘The 2001 U.S. recession brought Mexican growth to a halt, and foreign investors have begun moving production to lower cost locations in Asia.’
    stop, standstill
    cessation, termination, stoppage, stopping, close, end, discontinuation, discontinuance
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1British A minor stopping place on a local railway line.
      • ‘Among the victims was the Skipton to Ilkley line and about 80 stations and halts in the Aire and Wharfe valleys and in the Bradford area.’
      • ‘There are five halts along the line with an occasional passing loop in the event of more than one train running at the same time.’
      • ‘There is a new suburban railway line with excellent little halts by Martin Despang, and a new station for intercity ICE trains has been built on the Berlin-Hanover line.’
      • ‘In this article Weston Subedge was described as just a halt not a station.’
      • ‘A new railway halt, with maybe an extension of the Dart electrification, would provide the necessary fast link to the city centre.’

Phrases

  • call a halt

    • Demand or order a stop.

      ‘he decided to call a halt to all further discussion’
      • ‘It calls a halt to everything else across the borough.’
      • ‘It is time somebody called a halt to this nonsense or even shouted stop.’
      • ‘A despairing Whitney calls a halt to proceedings.’
      • ‘A gentle breeze at low level becomes a dangerous gust at 233 ft, and when the anonometer tells him the wind-speed is around 37 mph, Ditchburn calls a halt to operations.’
      • ‘An order by its board of directors called a halt to operations at all production units, sections, services and departments.’
      • ‘He claimed that the probability is that in the course of a telephone conversation on the morning of 10 November Hitler instructed Goebbels to draw up an order calling a halt to the violence.’
      • ‘It was a tall order for Irish business to call a halt at such short notice and some annoyance was understandable.’
      • ‘After three hours of walking through the night, Bailey had called a halt and ordered a twenty minute rest.’
      • ‘The year 2001 could be the one in which America calls a halt to its long love affair with capital punishment.’
      • ‘The first step taken in halting spending running out of control is to call a halt to the hiring of staff.’

Origin

Late 16th century: originally in the phrase make halt, from German haltmachen, from halten ‘to hold’.

Pronunciation

halt

/hɔːlt/

Main definitions of halt in English

: halt1halt2

halt2

adjective

archaic
  • Lame.

    ‘if a man were halt or hunch'd’
    • ‘If a woman were blind, the good wonder-workers would give her back her eyes; if a man were halt, they would give him back his leg.’
    • ‘"He who is halt" clearly refers to Zar, who walks with a painful limp because of a leg injury he suffered many years before.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]archaic
  • Walk with a limp.

    ‘he halted slightly in his walk’
    • ‘It was then perceptible that he halted slightly in his walk; and, indeed, he had been lame from his birth.’
    • ‘Jacob steps forth to meet him halfway, alone, before an army, halting and limping and bowing down to the ground.’

Origin

Old English healtian (verb), halt, healt (adjective), of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation

halt

/hɔːlt/