Definition of halibut in English:

halibut

noun

  • 1A northern marine fish which is the largest of the flatfishes and important as a food fish.

    Genus Hippoglossus, family Pleuronectidae: H. hippoglossus of the Atlantic and H. stenolepis of the Pacific

    • ‘Populations of cod, haddock, halibut, red drum and yellowtail flounder are at record lows.’
    • ‘Instead, it joins a list of fish like salmon and halibut and catfish that are lower in mercury.’
    • ‘Think of the superb species of fish that come from our coastal waters - salmon, cod, halibut, lobster and sole - added to the freshwater fish such as pickerel, shellfish and whitefish.’
    • ‘Despite the waiter telling me the ceviche fish would be halibut and salmon, it actually was just scallops.’
    • ‘Fatty cold-water fish such as halibut, mackerel, herring, and salmon are good sources of EPA and DHA.’
    • ‘Some types of fish - such as cod, tuna or halibut - have less total fat, saturated fat and cholesterol than do meat and poultry.’
    • ‘As for the main course, the menu is long and ambitious, at least in terms of the types of fish available: halibut, salmon, orange roughy, and ahi tuna among others, all of which are grilled or pan-fried, as well as bouillabaisse.’
    • ‘These include scallops, shrimp, crab, haddock, cod, pollack, snapper, halibut and white tuna.’
    • ‘As for the fish, the halibut is the best and the most expensive at $7.95 for two good-size fillets, snowy white and delicate and encased in a flavorful golden-brown batter.’
    • ‘The new company would also aim to be in the forefront of developing other species in farmed versions - sturgeon, tilapia, yellowtail, barramundi, halibut, cod, are amongst those mentioned.’
    • ‘You'll also find DHA in salmon, halibut, mackerel, sardines and striped bass as well as flaxseed oil and fish oil supplements.’
    • ‘Common varieties of fish - often eaten raw - include cod, salmon, trout, halibut, and redfish.’
    • ‘The Cowries also run a fish filleting factory, and family contacts in Scrabster mean they sell a large range of fresh, unsmoked fish - from haddock and halibut to monkfish, mackerel and plaice.’
    • ‘The EU Fisheries Commission told the Court that Spanish vessels caught almost 10,000 tonnes more fish than they were allowed permission for, including cod, monkfish, halibut and mackerel.’
    • ‘For the non-fish eaters there's steak and pasta, for example, but most people come here for the fish, and the restaurant focuses on halibut, haddock, cod, pollock, salmon and shellfish, prepared in a variety of ways.’
    • ‘Salmon, haddock, halibut, bass, cod, mackerel, sardines and tuna contain trace minerals and other nutrients that are not commonly or sufficiently found in our diets.’
    • ‘The records show how the price, adjusted for inflation, of fish and shellfish, including lobster, swordfish, oysters, halibut, haddock and sole, has climbed as stocks have collapsed.’
    • ‘His taro-dusted halibut with white beans is simply spectacular, the ultimate fish and chips.’
    • ‘The Northwest Atlantic's other groundfish include haddock, halibut, pollock, flounder and plaice.’
    • ‘Two types of Omega 3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA) are found in fatty fish such as salmon, white tuna, mackerel, rainbow trout, herring, halibut and sardines.’
    1. 1.1 Used in names of large edible flatfishes of families other than the true halibut, e.g. Greenland halibut.
      • ‘In the N. and NE Atlantic region, especially Norway and Greenland, halibut (including dried strips of the flesh) has consistently been an important element in the diet.’
      • ‘The California halibut is a flatfish with an oblong, compressed body and a large, powerful, broad tail.’
      • ‘Fodrie, a second-year student working with Levin, will use the CEQI grant to study the California halibut, an ecologically and economically important finfish.’
      • ‘I ate smoked scallops with cauliflower purée and lobster vinaigrette; halibut with fricassee of oysters and artichoke dumpling; and creme brûlée and strawberry tartare with basil sorbet.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from haly ‘holy’ + obsolete butt ‘flatfish’ (because it was often eaten on holy days).

Pronunciation

halibut

/ˈhalɪbət/