Definition of gymnogene in English:

gymnogene

noun

  • A name used in Africa for the harrier hawk.

    • ‘Along the trail more than 200 bird species can be recorded, including gymnogenes, long-tailed wagtails, bald ibis and Knysna louries.’
    • ‘Large crocodiles wander under the trees, far from the nearest water, scavenging for dead bats - along with vultures, gymnogenes and a host of other predators.’
    • ‘From this vantage point you're at eye level with black eagles, auger buzzards, gymnogenes, trumpeter hornbills, peregrine falcons and occasionally the rare taita falcon’
    • ‘The Lodge has a wonderful relaxing ambiance and the highlights of the day may be a herd of elephants slurping water out of the reservoir or a pair of gymnogenes wheeling in the thermals above you.’
    • ‘Other commonly-seen species include gymnogenes, black shouldered kites and forest and mountain buzzards.’
    • ‘Expect a good variety of raptors including tawny eagles, secretary birds and gymnogenes.’
    • ‘Goshawks are seen often - their chief prey also being hapless and harassed adult doves usually while feeding - while I've seen gymnogenes in various places recently.’
    • ‘This eagle-sized bird had a modified ankle joint, which permitted a high degree of flexibility both frontwards and backwards, as well as to either side, similar to the living but considerably smaller gymnogenes or harrier-hawks Polyboroides of Africa.’
    • ‘Bridwatchers may be lucky enough to spot the gymnogenes that circle the village in search of prey or to the shy Bokmakierie that can often be heard calling early in the morning.’
    • ‘Two gymnogenes were seen perched harassing feral pigeons on the roof of our office building just off Rivonia Road on Wednesday last week.’

Origin

Late 19th century: from modern Latin Gymnogenys (former genus name), literally ‘bare-chinned’.

Pronunciation

gymnogene

/ˈdʒɪmnə(ʊ)dʒiːn/