Definition of gumption in English:

gumption

noun

informal
  • [mass noun] Shrewd or spirited initiative and resourcefulness:

    ‘the president would hire almost any young man who had the gumption to ask for a job’
    • ‘It's about time someone outside the Religious Right got some media savvy and gumption.’
    • ‘That took gumption, not to mention good ole-fashioned American Ingenuity.’
    • ‘Working this out at home will permit you to schedule around it, and will give you enough gumption to face the chaos at the festival theatres.’
    • ‘And then, if you have the imagination and gumption, you can stop just being at the receiving end of news.’
    • ‘How much gumption does it take to pillory the malfeasant editors, reporters, and publisher who turned to compost ages ago?’
    • ‘But if the migrants bike from a poor country to our rich one, they are demonstrating not British gumption but foreign deviousness.’
    • ‘It sure takes some gumption to assemble a flatpack yacht.’
    • ‘They played with the spirit and gumption that made them world champions, resisting all temptation to throw in the towel or play for outright draws.’
    • ‘He should take enormous pride that his enthusiasm and gumption have turned Motherwell around in recent years.’
    • ‘I imagine the endless nights of winter and reflect on the strength and gumption required to survive in the dark and the cold.’
    • ‘Again, we are seeing nothing unusual here, except perhaps gumption.’
    • ‘All it would take is a bit of gumption and a modicum of courage.’
    • ‘He has crossed the line, and we've got to have enough and gumption to stand up and say enough's enough.’
    • ‘If Croydon Council hasn't got an accountant in its ranks or a commercially-minded businessman with a sense of gumption, I can provide one.’
    • ‘So beyond greed and gumption is opportunism, optimism… and some great success stories!’
    • ‘I was a feckless young man, without direction, commonsense, or gumption.’
    • ‘I have known people well into their 70s who have more character and gumption than people a quarter of their years.’
    • ‘Since then, despite showing terrific gumption to answer all the questions asked of them, they have not played teams of this calibre.’
    • ‘Unbridled teenage gumption as practiced in the U.S., it seems, is the answer to all problems.’
    • ‘Take a minute to deliver some well deserved applause for this kid, whose gumption we should all long to emulate.’
    initiative, resourcefulness, enterprise, imagination, imaginativeness, ingenuity, inventiveness
    cleverness, astuteness, shrewdness, acumen, discernment, understanding, reason, wisdom, sagacity, sense, common sense, wit, mother wit, native wit, native ability, practicality
    spirit, forcefulness, backbone, pluck, mettle, nerve, courage
    get-up-and-go, grit, spunk, oomph, nous, savvy, horse sense
    loaf, common
    smarts
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 18th century (originally Scots): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

gumption

/ˈɡʌm(p)ʃ(ə)n/