Definition of guid in English:

guid

noun

  • Scottish form of good
    • ‘This was exactly my grandmother's time, and her guid Scots tongue was evidently inside me waiting to be tapped.’
    • ‘The guid folk of Airdrie should embrace and celebrate Ms Mitchell's talent and begin immediately the quest for a worthy successor to this largely unsung heroine.’
    • ‘As a young Scot, I would have to put aside trivial matters such as not liking the taste of alcohol, and learn to love a guid drink.’
    • ‘So bedazzled are we by the prospect of internet nationhood, it seems, that thousands of guid Caledonians have apparently already rushed forward to grab their little piece of Alba in cyberspace.’
    • ‘But this all has to happen in a climate where Scottish education has had its guid conceit of itself shredded by such things as last year's SQA fiasco.’
    • ‘None the less, despite stigmatization in school, neglect by officialdom, and marginalization in the media, people of all backgrounds have since the 16c insisted on regarding the guid Scots tongue as their national language.’
    • ‘Instead it will be renamed the Gey Gordons, ‘gey’ being a guid Scots word for ‘a good amount’.’
    • ‘Whether this is more fair play, ‘Ah kent his faither’, or guid sense, is for you to judge - it generally makes for a better game.’

Pronunciation

guid

/ɡɪd/