Main definitions of grouse in English

: grouse1grouse2grouse3

grouse1

noun

  • 1A medium to large game bird with a plump body and feathered legs, the male being larger and more brightly coloured than the female.

    • ‘Which was the fastest game bird in Europe - the golden plover or the grouse?’
    • ‘The first year of the project saw 30 young black grouse released in October 2003.’
    • ‘Business as usual is what has driven the greater sage grouse to its precarious brink.’
    • ‘The black grouse is Scotland's second-most endangered bird after centuries of habitat destruction and hunting.’
    • ‘Pair up female and male black grouse that have no chemistry - the female isn't interested in the male.’
    1. 1.1mass noun The flesh of the grouse as food.
      • ‘Between you and me, I had too much grouse and red wine last night and mackerel is very good for lowering cholesterol.’
      • ‘And the fare was always good - the roast grouse even excellent.’
      • ‘The grouse had been hung too long and cooked too long.’
      • ‘Roast grouse with poached plums was just drowned in jam (game wants bread sauce, crumbs and red wine in a glass, that's all) and the chicken was stuffed not with salmon this time, but foie gras.’
      • ‘The breast of grouse was slightly overdone and a bit dry, but had the intriguingly complex flavours of wild moorland feeding.’
      • ‘As we near the beginning of the autumn game season, consider brambles as accompaniments in sauces; with their tart sweetness, they complement perfectly the richness of game such as venison, grouse or pigeon.’
      • ‘He said the trick with cooking grouse was to keep it simple - but, if they stick to the rules, Atkins dieters may have to forego some of the trimmings that come with the new-season bird, such as parsnip crisps and bread sauce.’
      • ‘Whole roast grouse may still come with game chips and bread sauce but there is game jus rather than over-thickened gravy.’
      • ‘One of the best ways to cook grouse to appreciate its fresh gamey flavour is to remove the breasts and pan-fry them.’
      • ‘I had the whole roast grouse with ‘banana fondants’ and baby onions for €26.’
      • ‘After that, I had a sensational roast young grouse served medium-rare.’
      • ‘I try to replicate my early success by bringing out the abattis à la bourguignonne: giblets of duck, pigeon, and grouse cooked in a red-wine sauce.’
      • ‘One day it would be noodles with garlic-butter sauce and a glass of pomegranate juice, the next it would be roasted grouse, bread, and a mug of sweetened milk.’
      • ‘Hanging game can't be that important or restaurants wouldn't be full of pretentious prats eating grouse on the 12th of August, the only day when you can guarantee the birds can't have been hung.’
      • ‘Roast grouse is where traditional cooking and accompaniments can't be beaten - bread sauce, watercress, game gravy, even buttery fried crumbs or game chips all are perfect partners to roast grouse.’

Origin

Early 16th century: perhaps related to medieval Latin gruta or to Old French grue ‘crane’.

Pronunciation

grouse

/ɡraʊs/

Main definitions of grouse in English

: grouse1grouse2grouse3

grouse2

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Complain about something trivial; grumble.

    ‘she heard him grousing about his assistant’
    • ‘Two guys next to me were grousing about getting older.’
    • ‘Typically, customers do grouse, but in the aggregate, they've not rebelled and over time have come to accept the practice as fully entrenched.’
    • ‘‘Oh, fine, so maybe there's some truth in it,’ he groused.’
    • ‘I don't need to begin this new Tuesday by grousing over an annoyance rather easily fixed with a few keystrokes.’
    • ‘Commercial snapper crews grouse also about offshore shrimpers, although not quite so vocally, and feel that sport fishermen may get too large a share.’
    • ‘There are some members of parliament who are being quoted grousing about the queen's role in all of this.’
    • ‘For decades, the moguls groused because their products, unlike cars and potato chips, were not endlessly reproducible.’
    • ‘Most people loved it, but one old woman was grousing away (while still watching, mind you) at all those hundreds of pounds being wasted.’
    • ‘I've groused about this before and will probably grouse again in the future.’
    • ‘Have you ever worried that people are grousing about the egregious errors of your judgment?’
    • ‘‘I don't know what the American people think,’ Roosevelt groused.’
    • ‘Our girls were pouring topsoil over each other when my wife began grousing that the tourists were ugly; Blue Spring gets up to 2,000 visitors a day because of the manatees.’
    • ‘I was grousing about R.'s stubborn refusal to accept the new realities of her life and to find some new pastimes that match her abilities.’
    • ‘So today, I'm grousing and trying to find something constructive to do with the day.’
    • ‘‘These journalists come here with their minds already made up,’ he groused.’
    • ‘I expected to drag you, moaning, groaning and grousing, out of your warm bed.’
    • ‘For nearly as long as there has been an entrepreneurial space industry, there has been griping and grousing about regulatory issues, as well as lobbying for legislation to resolve those flaws.’
    • ‘He was grousing about classical music compilations and how they ruined the intent of the original composer.’
    • ‘There's been quite a lot of grumbling and grousing in corporate America.’
    • ‘When a movie is broken into a series of vignettes as this one is, critics usually can't resist saying which vignette is the best and grousing that some vignettes are better than others.’
    grumble, complain, moan, groan, protest, whine, bleat, carp, cavil, lodge a complaint, make a complaint, make a fuss
    View synonyms

noun

  • A complaint or grumble.

    ‘our biggest grouse was about the noise of construction work’
    • ‘Even in places where there is some greenery, the Museum or say, Kanakakkunnu, the common grouse voiced by regulars is that the number of breeze and shade-giving trees has dwindled over the years.’
    • ‘The grouses tend to focus on the traffic, the airport and the shortage of hotel rooms.’
    • ‘My life [as an excavator] has been full of grouses about local museums not taking my material.’
    • ‘That proper water supply has been ensured to four residential extensions which came up only recently, while things continue to ail in the old town limits is another grouse.’
    • ‘I dislike hanging around people with lots of grouses.’
    • ‘Their main grouse was the 0.15 per cent securities transaction tax on share transactions.’
    • ‘The grouse of aged visitors to the Eco Park against the Corporation is that it has not taken any steps to develop the three-acre area on its southern side.’
    • ‘Of course, there are the grouses like high freight tariffs.’
    • ‘Since then we have had grouses about red-tape, taxation, education, high interest rates, bad weather, directors’ pay, students' fees and much more besides.’
    • ‘Have a grouse about an inconsiderate bus driver?’
    • ‘People here have another big grouse: Government does not seem to be interested in registering this district on the tourist map of the state.’
    • ‘But take away that personal grouse, and you've still got a strong selection from one of the best damn dance-groups ever.’
    • ‘However, the main grouse of these publishers is that they do not get much by way of advertisement support from corporates, which prefer the English publications.’
    • ‘But Eliot himself remarked, ‘To me it was only the relief of a personal and insignificant grouse against life; it is just a piece of rhythmical grumbling.’’
    • ‘How terribly twisted must one's mind become to lead one to kill another human being in cold blood after nursing some grouse over turf or money?’
    • ‘Finally someone is sounding out the grouses of the general public on the papers regarding the ridiculously expensive cost of things out there.’
    • ‘Their grouse: expansive windmill-farms look unsightly!’
    • ‘Their grouse is that other south Indian language films are sound both technically and visually as they have film cities of their own.’
    • ‘Now here is my particular grouse: What was in the minds of the designers who thought up that last set of track wear for our women runners?’
    • ‘He had even described his short public life as a ‘long litany of failures ‘and ‘heartfelt personal grouses.’’
    grumble, complaint, moan, groan, whine, grievance, objection, protest, protestation, cavil, quibble
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 19th century: of unknown origin; compare with grouch.

Pronunciation

grouse

/ɡraʊs/

Main definitions of grouse in English

: grouse1grouse2grouse3

grouse3

adjective

Australian, NZ
informal
  • Very good (used as a general term of approval)

    ‘the car was a grouse tomato red which everyone liked’
    • ‘Civil war was the winner on the day and I hope youse all have a grouse night.’
    • ‘Apart from that, though, the rest is pretty grouse.’

Origin

1920s: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

grouse

/ɡraʊs/