Definition of gross in English:

gross

adjective

  • 1(especially of wrongdoing) very obvious and unacceptable.

    ‘gross human rights abuses’
    ‘gross negligence’
    ‘a gross exaggeration’
    • ‘However, the irregularities of the count, and the gross violence and intimidation in the months leading up to the vote, make her legal challenge to the result very strong.’
    • ‘To say that such a fate would be unpleasant would be an astronomically gross understatement.’
    • ‘So the idea that you can buy your way in is much more than a ‘trade in titles’; it is a gross corruption of the system.’
    • ‘Even if we forget about principle and adopt a pragmatic stance, there is little to be gained in appeasing gross violence by the powerful.’
    • ‘I think it would be a gross exaggeration to say there are difficulties all over the country with them.’
    • ‘Right now my research is taking the form of looking into the gross human-rights abuses in our prison system, particularly women's prisons.’
    • ‘Thirdly, the level of discrimination involved was gross and obvious.’
    • ‘We and the civilized world are in shock at this gross inhumanity, and we extend heartfelt condolences to the families of those killed and wounded.’
    • ‘He is disgusting when he uses gross oversimplifications to describe the policies of foreign leaders.’
    • ‘Such a picture is clearly a gross exaggeration.’
    • ‘We are concerned about these stories which seem to be a gross exaggeration of the facts.’
    • ‘The apathy, lack of understanding and political will and gross corruption in the government enhances the scope of the industry to continue with impunity.’
    • ‘The only problem with this report is that it contains flat out misrepresentations, gross exaggerations, flying leaps of logic and claims that cannot stand up to rigorous scrutiny.’
    • ‘Instead, she has chosen a dangerous, heartbreaking life, which sees risk and suffering and gross inhumanity every single day.’
    • ‘To suggest that it would become an open door for crooks, conmen and other criminals is a gross exaggeration.’
    • ‘‘This is unacceptable and a gross waste of effort,’ he said.’
    • ‘We're more worried about the gross abuses and gross exaggerations of these ideas which originated in philosophy of science but which have trickled down in vulgarised form to anthropology and cultural studies.’
    • ‘The indignation is compounded by evidence of gross corruption.’
    • ‘The video footage was so obviously a gross invasion of privacy and a violation of human dignity.’
    • ‘And that was seen widely as a gross abuse of power.’
    flagrant, blatant, glaring, obvious, overt, evident, conspicuous
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  • 2(of income, profit, or interest) without deduction of tax or other contributions; total.

    ‘the gross amount of the gift was £1,000’
    Often contrasted with net (sense 1 of the adjective)
    • ‘The overall effect will be offset by higher insurance thresholds, and a slightly higher base for income taxation as social contributions are deducted from gross income before charging income taxes.’
    • ‘The ordinary income rate that you are taxed under is dependent on the amount of adjusted gross income that you receive for the tax year and your filing status.’
    • ‘The very high rates of interest then lead to a sharp fall in net profits, and interest payments might even exceed the entire gross profit in the case of some branches or regions.’
    • ‘You can't start deducting such items until they total 2% of adjusted gross income.’
    • ‘Figures for income, gross profit, salaries, motor expenses, drawings etc are fed into the Revenue computer system.’
    • ‘This is like the gross profit figure for other companies (except that interest has already been removed since that's an operational activity for banks).’
    • ‘A non-resident is taxed in Spain on income arising from Spanish property at the rate of 25 per cent on gross income without any deductions for expenses or interest costs.’
    • ‘For self-employed applicants, the Department of Education wants to see a full declaration of total gross income.’
    • ‘Last year's gross revenues amounted to more than $7 million.’
    • ‘The Cabinet is most likely to stand by its commitments concerning profit tax and gross income tax.’
    • ‘There was discontent regarding the 54% default level set for British horseracing's share of total gross profits.’
    • ‘If a guarantee is received that a room will be rented under the scheme, banks are believed to be willing to add the tax free amount to your gross income prior to deciding your mortgage entitlement.’
    • ‘There was evidence of healthy like-for-like growth in both revenues and gross profit.’
    • ‘Since land-value increment tax is a tax on gains in asset income or value, all the occurring costs and fees are deductible from the gross income.’
    • ‘Please specify whether ‘revenues’ is a reference to total income, total turnover, gross profit, net profit or some other measure of income.’
    • ‘As a result of these contributions, their 2002 adjusted gross income is $30,000.’
    • ‘After subtracting the general operating costs and the depreciation from the gross profit, we arrive at the operating income.’
    • ‘Companies whose deductions exceed gross income for 2001 and 2002 will be allowed to carry the deductions back and re-file taxes for past years.’
    • ‘That means your loss, combined with all other miscellaneous deductions, must exceed 2% of your adjusted gross income for it to do you any good.’
    • ‘Net profit is your gross profit less taxes and interest.’
    total, whole, entire, complete, full, overall, comprehensive, aggregate
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    1. 2.1 (of weight) including contents, wrappings, or other variable items; overall.
      ‘a projected gross take-off weight of 500,000 pounds’
      • ‘Airplanes can't exceed a gross weight of 1,320 pounds or 1,430 pounds for seaplanes.’
      • ‘Because our gross weight was about 40,000 pounds above max-landing gross weight, we continued, gear down, to Colorado Springs.’
      • ‘A figure of a gross weight of about 30 tonnes was mentioned.’
      • ‘To relate this to current practice a tractor and trailer combination today with a load of sugar beet or barley would have a gross weight of over 20 tonnes.’
      • ‘This whole thing will be run like a classic flight test program of expanding the envelope, but we will always take off at full gross weight.’
      • ‘A no-flap approach was flown with a 220,000 lb gross weight, flying at 198 knots indicated airspeed.’
      • ‘My body definitely wouldn't handle 7.5 Gs if I didn't adjust my gross weight before takeoff.’
      • ‘Liberator crews used the instrument to calculate gross weight and centre of gravity, as well as to examine the effect of the centre of gravity of crew movement, fuel consumption and release of bomb loads.’
      • ‘He weighed his reasons on scales that could count not just gross weight but the minuscule grammage of real worth.’
      • ‘At gross weight, the B - 2 tipped the scales at 1299 pounds.’
      • ‘She then maneuvered the jet away from populated areas and gained altitude while simultaneously dumping fuel to reduce gross weight for landing.’
      • ‘Once inside the factory grounds, the lorries drive over a weighbridge where their gross weight is automatically measured.’
      • ‘An employer now requires approval from the Director of Inspection with responsibility for mines only when the gross weight of such a machine is over 32,000 kilograms.’
      • ‘Our rule of thumb is that a floor jack needs to be rated for at least three-quarters of a vehicle's gross weight.’
      • ‘All-out gross weight - loaded, gas etc. - would run about 68,847 pounds.’
      • ‘When the jet was stable, we began a wide, right-hand turn toward land and set up an orbit about 20 miles northeast of Oceana to adjust gross weight.’
      • ‘This would have permitted much more flexibility in basing since the B-52 is limited by its heavy gross weight and long takeoff ground roll.’
      • ‘This profile required the crew to make sure the autorotation RPM was within limits based on environmental conditions and aircraft gross weight.’
      • ‘Our three-engine rate of climb would have been extremely limited with the inability to raise gear, high gross weight, and high ambient temperature.’
      • ‘Was I good enough to take off at a high gross weight, lose an engine, avoid the unseen mountains within a mile and a half of the field while on instruments?’
    2. 2.2 (of a score in golf) as actually played, without taking handicap into account.
      • ‘Off a combined handicap of 5 they returned a gross score of 68 to produce net a 63.’
      • ‘Those scores were gross scores off his newly lowered 27 handicap!’
      • ‘Division III took care of players with no official handicap and was awarded to the player with the lowest gross score.’
      • ‘She broke the ladies' course record, on the Kirkwall golf course, on Tuesday evening, with a gross score of 68.’
      • ‘A gross score of 66 less their team handicap of 6 produced a net 60.’
  • 3Very rude or coarse; vulgar.

    ‘a gross, slap-and-tickle version of ‘The Taming of the Shrew’’
    • ‘The former worships the gross material object, while the latter have recourse to imagery.’
    • ‘Jane was no beauty, always delving into some novel of gross sentimentality, and her conversational skills were disgustingly average.’
    • ‘By the influence of the mode of passion, which is related to air, we endeavor to manifest the form on the gross level.’
    • ‘A man fallen in the ocean of nescience cannot be saved simply by rescuing his outward dress - the gross material body.’
    • ‘Matter exists on a gross level, is stable and slow to change.’
    • ‘While on a gross level we can distinguish one thing from another, on a refined level no thing is actually find-able.’
    • ‘I found your gross tongues disgusting in their barbarism, but still I learned them.’
    vulgar, coarse, crude, obscene, rude, ribald, lewd, bawdy, dirty, filthy, earthy, smutty, risqué, indecent, indelicate, Improper, impure, unseemly, offensive, pornographic
    boorish, loutish, oafish, thuggish, brutish, bearish, neanderthal, philistine, coarse, uncouth, unsavoury, crass, vulgar, common, unrefined, unsophisticated, uncultured, uncultivated, undiscriminating, tasteless, insensitive, unfeeling, imperceptive, callous
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    1. 3.1 Unattractively fat or bloated.
      ‘I feel fat, gross—even my legs feel flabby’
      • ‘At least a third of the people promenading along the seafront were more than just overweight - they were gross, with their swollen bellies leading the way.’
      obese, corpulent, overweight, fat, big, large, outsize, outsized, massive, immense, huge, colossal, fleshy, flabby, portly, bloated, bulky, lumpish
      View synonyms
    2. 3.2informal Very unpleasant; repulsive.
      ‘‘Then I threw up,’ said Russ. ‘How gross,’ Ellie muttered’
      • ‘Blame it on a yucky mix of sweat and gross bacteria.’
      • ‘The tracks were strewn with trash - gross, disgusting and overwhelming.’
      • ‘This went beyond gross and into seriously disgusting.’
      • ‘He came back to the table and told Sam that Ms. Shaw thought it was gross and icky.’
      • ‘He likes gross, disgusting, and obscene killings.’
      • ‘The hospital staff should be more aware of how gross and disgusting it is to see a major hospital not being kept clean.’
      • ‘You're gross, you're disgusting and you don't even know how to dress well.’
      • ‘Whilst we gained a sense of Caliban's non-humanness, we lost much sense of him as a gross, repulsive creature.’
      • ‘I liked the way they were to each other; it didn't seem gross or disgusting, like what other kids had told me.’
      • ‘Spiders are fundamentally gross and yucky creatures and any messing with their place in the scheme of things will produce something grosser and yuckier still.’
      • ‘Do you know how sick, gross, and disgusting that is?’
      • ‘And true, he carries at least 108 diseases and is just completely gross and icky and mouse-y.’
      • ‘Once again, it is not intended that these observations lead to a conclusion that writing for reluctant reader boys must necessarily be gross and disgusting, far from it.’
      • ‘So, to all you spitters out there: it's gross, disgusting, unhealthy and classless, and every time you do it you look like a trashy hood rat.’
      • ‘No subject is taboo, and there is no subject so gross, so obnoxious, so embarrassing, it cannot be paraded in front of everyone.’
      • ‘I mean, everyone I talk to thinks I'm a nerdy loser or a gross loser or an obnoxious loser.’
      • ‘That was gross and disgusting and I don't think I want to talk to you anymore.’
      disgusting, repellent, repulsive, abhorrent, loathsome, detestable, sickening, nauseating, nauseous, stomach-churning, stomach-turning, off-putting, unpalatable, unappetizing, uninviting, unsavoury, distasteful, foul, nasty, obnoxious, odious
      View synonyms
  • 4General or large-scale; not detailed.

    ‘at the gross anatomical level’
    • ‘If infection is suspected, the wound area must be assessed for obvious signs of gross infection, and the infection should be confirmed by culturing the organism.’
    • ‘In summary, this is an excellent book with extremely useful text, superb gross pictures, and generally very good microscopic pictures.’
    • ‘Oh, we have a good idea, on a gross level, of what governments should not do to really screw up the economy.’
    • ‘Obviously, these are gross distinctions, but somehow our brains require some way of distinguishing the Old Order from the New.’
    • ‘Generally, gross lesions are not observed in the central nervous system of birds affected with Newcastle disease virus regardless of the pathotype.’
    • ‘Primary homology hypotheses were generated for features of gross morphology, leaf anatomy, and chromosome number.’
    • ‘Their genomic structure is similar at a gross level, but has yet to be compared comprehensively in detail.’
    • ‘Making the world better in gross material terms is nothing to sneeze at.’
    • ‘There is widespread consensus that an organism's lifestyle is often reflected in the skeleton at various levels ranging from gross morphology to histological structure.’

adverb

  • Without tax or other contributions having been deducted.

    ‘if the value of your Bond is £50,000 or more the interest will be paid gross’
    • ‘Overall they estimate that carers save the State at least E2 billion gross each year.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Produce or earn (an amount of money) as gross profit or income.

    ‘the film went on to gross $8 million’
    • ‘Since then, the movie has grossed more than 200 million in theatre and video sales.’
    • ‘In the United States alone, the title grossed an unprecedented $30 million in sales.’
    • ‘If healthcare grosses $1.2 trillion in 1999, and fraud represents 10% of that total, that means a tidy sum of $100 billion a year lost to fraudulent claims.’
    • ‘The movie is grossing $25 million dollars a day.’
    • ‘He also informed delegates that the qualifiers had grossed a million less than in the previous year because of falling attendances.’
    • ‘Let's say that a worker grosses about $9,000 a year.’
    • ‘But who cares what purists or musos think when there's a buck to be grossed?’
    • ‘Last weekend, four new movies opened and grossed about $61 million between them.’
    • ‘For several years, it was the highest grossing film of all time, and that makes a statement worth listening to.’
    • ‘The first two episodes grossed an extraordinary £1.1 billion.’
    • ‘It is the highest grossing R-rated film ever, outdistancing the runner up by 15%.’
    • ‘And, in the spirit of its trashy themes, it has grossed its director a fortune.’
    • ‘This film did of course gross an enormous amount of money worldwide and in America, and also received a pile of Oscar nominations.’
    • ‘When's the last time you hear about a poet's latest world tour grossing a million a night?’
    • ‘It had enormous success at the box office running for six months in Sydney alone and became one of the three highest grossing Australian documentaries since 2000.’
    • ‘The oversized celebrity has been in 30 films since 1970, grossing hundreds of millions of dollars.’
    • ‘Which film has grossed more money than any other this year?’
    • ‘It would go on to become Fox's highest grossing film of 1948.’
    • ‘It became the highest grossing film of all time within two months, and every cast member including the dog won Oscars at the Academy Awards.’
    • ‘It was the second highest grossing film in Korea that year, and the highest grossing comedy ever.’
    earn, make, bring in, take, get, receive, fetch, draw, collect
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    1. 1.1gross something up Add deductions such as tax to a net amount.
      ‘all commuting costs were grossed up for tax and National Insurance deductions’
      • ‘So every pound that you pay into your pension will be grossed up to £1.28.’
      • ‘It could prove very costly if the payment is grossed up as emoluments.’
      • ‘I am, however, prepared to ‘add back’ a number of the items that are considered to be personal to the Respondent that are written off as business expenses and grossing that amount up.’
      • ‘One important aspect of builder/seller funding of downpayments through these programs is that transaction prices are grossed up in excess of true market prices.’
      • ‘Even if the child is not a taxpayer, contributions are grossed up by the Inland Revenue to a £3,600 limit, which means that the contributor has to provide just £2,808, with the taxman contributing a further £792.’
      • ‘They used the syndicate figures for Syndicates 103 and 1053 and then grossed them up in order to relate to the anticipated premium income - that accounted for the degree of precision.’
      • ‘That may not sound much, but, grossing it up, it works out to 35 minutes a week or over 30 hours a year.’
      • ‘Some small businesses with gross receipts up to $10 million can now use the cash method of accounting.’
      • ‘Even if we do not gross it up, there is $80,000 in that.’
      • ‘The maximum you can contribute in a year is £2,808, to which the taxman adds relief, grossing it up up to £3,600.’

noun

  • 1plural grossAn amount equal to twelve dozen; 144.

    ‘fifty-five gross of tins of processed milk’
    • ‘In the meantime, I have ordered a gross of hatches and a quantity of timber from the catalogue, so I can batten them down and engage in some hardcore shivering on the big day.’
    • ‘That's like giving a kid a gross of bottle rockets and a new Bic lighter, then leaving the boy unsupervised - and being shocked, shocked to hear small explosions in the distance.’
    • ‘It seems county council might benefit if something suitably heavy (a gross of copies of Chicken Little?) were bounced off the thick heads of its members.’
    • ‘There have been no single straws - more a gross of wire bound bales weighing down and breaking asunder a once optimistic and enthusiastic camel's back.’
    • ‘Personally, I'm wondering just how much he paid for the gross of grovelling apologies he's been using like there's no tomorrow…’
  • 2plural grossesA gross profit or income.

    ‘the box office grosses mounted’
    • ‘Broadway's weekly grosses are running ahead of this time last year, and every theater in the city is booked, with more than a dozen new shows opening over the next six months.’
    • ‘It's unfortunate, because while it may lead to big opening grosses, a lot of pictures that are a little different and don't fit so neatly into either a niche market or a high-concept marketing approach can get lost in the shuffle.’
    • ‘Correct me if I'm wrong, but the two sequels cost about $350M combined, so this assumption is predicated on foreign grosses exceeding domestic.’
    • ‘But in terms of commercial success, in terms of grosses - I really don't know.’
    • ‘Selling out has more to do with ticket grosses than the antimaterialist who stands apart from society.’
    • ‘Things were helped by its non-US grosses being much greater than that, but still the studio would have been hard pressed to get its outlay back.’
    • ‘They're so intent on having big first weekend grosses.’
    • ‘In less than thirty years, roughly since the premiere of Star Wars, domestic grosses - once the industry's bread and butter - have become a virtual loss leader.’
    • ‘Film can sometimes seem obsessed with the hype and glory of the latest passing sensation and the opening weekend grosses of the newest blockbuster.’
    • ‘This is normally a sign that audiences like a film and the film's grosses are going to hold up well in subsequent weeks, so the film's final gross could still be quite good.’
    • ‘Now solve it for U.S. grosses, adjusted for inflation.’
    • ‘It reported grosses for 20 weeks after that, most of which was second run, but that accounted for only $7 million of the $176 million domestic take.’
    • ‘Chaplin had big box-office grosses, but he made relatively few pictures.’
    • ‘If you add up the grosses of all these titles and estimate final numbers for this year's already-in-release product, the total should be about the same from last year's 22 to this year's 20.’
    • ‘Projected grosses are reported during every news show each Sunday night, with ‘real’ numbers arriving 24 hours later.’
    • ‘Maybe it was at the time when reporting weekend grosses became a feature, and hence a yardstick of a film's importance, in purportedly high-minded papers.’
    • ‘The overall box office grosses for the summer season, which ends today, on Labor Day, is just slightly ahead of last summer's record pace.’
    • ‘But of all the Oscar nominees it has racked up by far the biggest domestic grosses so far.’
    • ‘I think one of the problems with film criticism is that we rarely talk about art anymore - we obsess about the grosses, we gossip about the ‘industry,’ we talk about this week's new movie in relation to last week's new movie.’
    • ‘It has been reporting low grosses so it may fade away soon.’

Phrases

  • by the gross

    • In large numbers or amounts.

      ‘auto companies are hiring by the gross’
      • ‘Before you start buying chicken breasts by the gross, here are a few things to consider about eating extra protein.’
      • ‘Still, unrequited love is on sale cheap, by the gross.’
      • ‘In 1982 I dare say I bought packets of chemical slug pellets by the gross.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • gross someone out

    • Disgust someone.

      ‘he used to eat worms to gross her out’
      • ‘I have a problem with blood and it just grosses me out badly.’
      • ‘If certain bodily functions or cockroaches really do gross you out, this study is not for you.’
      • ‘I didn't think raising meat made much of an impression on her other than to gross her out on butchering day.’
      • ‘Add a lot of squashed bugs and stuff that grosses you out.’
      • ‘That's okay - I did my best to gross him out by telling him about all the sugar we eat for breakfast here.’
      • ‘I did get in the kiss as I promised but it was a very quick chaste kinda one so I can't really say too much, other than I wasn't grossed out or anything so I guess he passes the first test.’
      • ‘Cronenberg, infamous for exploding heads and such, isn't going to let us go home without grossing us out just a bit.’
      • ‘If you want to gross him out, get a bowl of tuna salad and hide it under the passenger seat.’
      • ‘Maybe you used to love your dad's juicy T-bones, but the thought of eating meat grosses you out now.’
      • ‘No, the fact that you two got married is what grosses me out.’
      • ‘Eh, if I didn't know those two were only best friends, I would be grossed out.’
      • ‘It grossed me out at first, but it was commonplace in some cultures, especially tribal ones.’
      • ‘I still like Robbie an awful lot but he kind of grosses me out at the same time.’
      • ‘The thought of a litter tray in a bathroom just grosses me out.’
      • ‘However, he shot me a disgusted look, as if he was grossed out or something.’
      • ‘Let me run through a few examples of what people have had to do (if stuff grosses you out then stop reading).’
      • ‘I figured you were looking for something you could watch with a woman without grossing her out’
      • ‘Do not test the hearers’ tolerance by grossing them out with gratuitous obscenities.’
      • ‘He told me he was grossed out by my chocolate maggot story.’
      • ‘But for all I was grossed out, I was also engrossed.’
      • ‘I still haven't been able to make it past the second page of this discussion by nurses about what grosses them out, but I hope to do so someday.’
      • ‘Previously, all vacuum cleaners have kept the dirt hidden in a bag, with the assumption that it would simply gross you out to see how dirty your house is.’
      • ‘There are people sitting right behind you and you just grossed them out.’
      • ‘He is into the tone and not terribly interested in grossing you out.’
      • ‘I classify scaring the public with such a fact as something equivalent to grossing them out as well.’
      • ‘My sweetie whispered in my ear that it was totally grossing him out and he couldn't eat any.’
      • ‘If you plan on remaining roommates and it's really grossing you out, you have a few options.’
      • ‘If he's not freaking his classmates out in chemistry class, then he's grossing them out at lunch.’
      • ‘He told me that his dad is quite comfortable with the handling and filleting of fish so if I ever go fishing, I need to invite his dad along because this grosses me out.’
      • ‘I guess the idea is completely grossing him out.’
      disgust, revolt, repel, repulse, sicken, nauseate, cause to feel nauseous, make shudder, turn someone's stomach, make someone's gorge rise
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English (in the sense ‘thick, massive, bulky’): from Old French gros, grosse ‘large’, from late Latin grossus.

Pronunciation

gross

/ɡrəʊs/