Definition of groom in English:

groom

verb

[with object]
  • 1Brush and clean the coat of (a horse, dog, or other animal)

    ‘the horses were groomed and taken to shows’
    • ‘Did you see how perfectly groomed those horses were?’
    • ‘If your site is about pet grooming, tell them that right from the start.’
    • ‘They were grooming a palomino, quiffing up his mane and tying it with a red ribbon.’
    • ‘Then there's the outrageous price of keeping my insane dog groomed properly.’
    • ‘You start building a relationship with the horse through scratching or brushing the places the horse loves to be groomed.’
    • ‘Angie began to groom the horse's coat the best she could through the blurry vision that took over her eyesight.’
    • ‘Most cats tolerate grooming by the owner, especially once it becomes a regular event.’
    • ‘You must groom a Shih Tzu from the skin out to be effective.’
    • ‘There are immaculately turned out sheep, goats with coats that might have been tailored in Savile Row, ponies groomed gleamingly to perfection.’
    • ‘The poodle greeted the familiar feline, her fur looking particularly well groomed today.’
    • ‘So it looks as if teeth-cleaning is going to be a two-person job, and that we will have to try doing it with his face in the small cloth muzzle I usually use on him while he's being groomed.’
    • ‘Brushing out the coat of a Shih Tzu is the most important step in Shih Tzu dog grooming.’
    • ‘Wash your pet outdoors or talk to your veterinarian about professional pet grooming.’
    • ‘He stood with his head hanging, loving the attention, as I groomed him.’
    • ‘If you spend your mornings grooming horses, baling hay and cleaning stalls, you'll burn as many calories as you would walking for the same amount of time.’
    • ‘Brush or groom your dog at least once a week and use this time to check his body for unusual bumps, lumps or sores.’
    • ‘Get your dog groomed and dressed in time for Easter.’
    • ‘Red has taken to an impeccably groomed debutante poodle from town.’
    • ‘This book will also be an excellent guide to understanding the grooming requirements of a breed you may be considering, allowing you to make an informed decision.’
    curry, brush, comb, rub, rub down
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    1. 1.1 (of an animal) clean the fur or skin of (itself or another animal)
      ‘their main preoccupation is licking and grooming themselves’
      • ‘I have never seen any of my pets groom themselves properly.’
      • ‘They groom so incessantly that they develop great bald spots and skin lesions - and other poor mice housed with them also lose their hair.’
      • ‘Flying foxes have a long bristly tongue that's great for lapping up juicy fruit, and for licking and grooming themselves and their friends!’
      • ‘They noted that the mutant mice groomed themselves excessively-to the extent of creating bald spots and skin wounds.’
      • ‘It is next to impossible for a fruit bat to avoid the grit, which adheres to the sticky fruit it eats as well as to the animal itself; even as a bat grooms itself, it gets a mouthful of the ash.’
      • ‘Why do gecko feet stay sticky for months, when they walk on all kinds of surfaces and never groom their feet?’
      • ‘Pets usually remove some of the eggs while grooming themselves; others fall off as the animal moves from place to place.’
      • ‘Rabbits groom themselves just like cats, and consequently do get fur balls in their stomachs just like puss.’
      • ‘During these meetings the lorises groomed one another, play-wrestled, and fed.’
      • ‘The male carries, feeds, and grooms the infants - with help from their older siblings - and may even act as a midwife during birth, grooming and licking the newborn marmosets.’
      • ‘But when we put the camera on the lion in Kenya, the lion actually groomed itself and cleaned the camera lens for us.’
      • ‘Chinese honey bees have grooming behavior which can remove the mites from the bees.’
      • ‘When a cat grooms himself, he removes loose hair from throughout his body and it ends up in his stomach.’
      • ‘This can lead to the cat grooming its rear end less, due to discomfort or pain.’
      • ‘Increasingly, however, he was becoming listless and withdrawn, refusing invitations to play and grooming himself disconsolately.’
      • ‘Cats will groom themselves and this allows loose hair to come off the pet and end up in the stomachs.’
      • ‘With great dignity, she sits and carefully grooms herself, looking at me haughtily.’
      • ‘Cats groom themselves almost constantly, and swallow the loose hair that comes off their tongues.’
      • ‘A few paces away the cat sat grooming himself.’
      • ‘Other behaviors also appear to be normal: flies groom, court, mate, jump, and fly.’
      clean, tidy, smooth, arrange
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    2. 1.2often as adjective groomed Give a neat and tidy appearance to (someone)
      with submodifier ‘a beautifully groomed woman’
      ‘she pays great attention to grooming and clothes’
      • ‘Johnston said: ‘I've played with the wedge cut and dropped it over one eye but kept the feel very elegant and groomed.’’
      • ‘She was, as always, impeccably groomed and quite beautiful, but a petulant expression on her face marred her good looks slightly.’
      • ‘In the restaurant this morning, their neat, groomed creator chooses a well-organised breakfast of fruit followed by poached eggs.’
      • ‘Today more than ever, women appreciate men who are neatly groomed.’
      • ‘Their hair was always the optimum length and beautifully groomed.’
      • ‘Russians usually try to appear as neatly groomed and dressed as possible when out in public.’
      • ‘With his neat Savile Row pinstripe suit and beautifully groomed hair, he looks more like an English aristocrat than one of the biggest players in the petrochemicals business.’
      • ‘Judging from the immaculately groomed appearances of the students around her, Claire hadn't been the only one to spend a little extra time getting ready this morning.’
      • ‘His smart suit, beautifully groomed long hair and supreme confidence symbolized the vital reclamation of a lost life.’
      • ‘His straight raven-colored hair was almost perfectly groomed, and he smelled faintly of cologne or another fragrance.’
      • ‘If eyebrows are thick, they are groomed to perfection.’
      • ‘She is bouncy and friendly and immaculately groomed.’
      • ‘Her black hair was groomed well for somebody who was just born.’
      • ‘Dressed formally, and carefully groomed, he looked like a suitor.’
      • ‘Her silvery hair is perfectly groomed, her make-up subtly enhancing.’
      • ‘After her first outing as the Chancellor's wife at the Labour Party conference in September, groomed to perfection and wearing vivid crimson, the tabloids raved about her.’
      • ‘Turn the sun visors down and the vanity mirror has a sliding shutter too - move it aside and the light comes on so Madame can apply her make-up and step out perfectly groomed at the end!’
      • ‘I showered, groomed, clothed, and flicked on the TV for the last few minutes I had before I had to start walking.’
      • ‘Firstly, his hair was not perfectly groomed but instead it stuck up in strange directions.’
      • ‘I am being fed, groomed and clothed properly, so do not think I am being starved or abused.’
      neat, well groomed, well turned out, well dressed, besuited, smart, trim, dapper, elegant, chic
      brush, comb, smooth, do, dress, arrange, adjust, put in order, tidy, make tidy, spruce up, smarten up, preen, primp, freshen up
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 Look after (a lawn, ski slope, or other surface)
      ‘groom your lawn—keep the grass cut’
      • ‘Flying down a perfectly groomed trail in a winter wonderland is an image many of us fantasize about.’
      • ‘Waiting hopefully outside on the well - groomed lawn, they were both rewarded by his careful emergence through the back screen door.’
      • ‘The trail ahead was freshly groomed - those delicious ridges always make me think of a wedding cake.’
      • ‘Snowboarding is banned, but carefully groomed slopes and beginner and intermediate runs over 65 percent of the area offer easy skiing.’
      • ‘I am tempted to say that we suburban parents have it all wrong-with the tended lawns and groomed and protected childhoods we work so hard to provide.’
      • ‘Closed to motorized traffic, the road is groomed in winter for skiing.’
      • ‘Thanks largely to snowboarders, and abundant fresh snow topping up the slopes faster than it can be groomed, Japanese skiers have been discovering the joys of powder.’
      • ‘Infused with a sense of nostalgic charm, Chapman's caricatures evoke tearooms, groomed lawns, corrugated iron and lamingtons.’
      • ‘Vertical-mow only in a manner that grooms the surface or use brushings, which help control grain and encourage vertical growth.’
      • ‘Winter adds snowboarding, ice-skating, and cross-country and downhill skiing on the resort's groomed trails and ski slopes.’
      • ‘To make matters worse, the popularity of groomed lawns, ornamental hybrid plants and bug-free yards drives out native plant species.’
      • ‘Skiing alone down what appeared to be groomed slopes I didn't see anyone for several minutes, which several seasons in the Alps has taught me could only be because I'd strayed way off piste.’
      • ‘If your partner enjoys a little gentle skiing, Corviglia, the home mountain, has beautifully groomed slopes that will make the most amateur performer look good.’
      • ‘For nearly a century the groomed front lawn had been de rigueur on almost every street on this continent.’
      • ‘Some were tidy bungalows on streets with perfectly groomed lawns.’
      • ‘High security walls obscure sprawling lawns with exquisitely groomed coiffures.’
      • ‘There are just a few places I know of that groom trails for the sport.’
      brush, comb, smooth, do, dress, arrange, adjust, put in order, tidy, make tidy, spruce up, smarten up, preen, primp, freshen up
      View synonyms
  • 2Prepare or train (someone) for a particular purpose or activity.

    ‘star pupils who are groomed for higher things’
    • ‘They are grooming him for something, I just don't know what.’
    • ‘It seems that she was groomed for stardom from an early age and has been handed the opportunity rather than having to earn it.’
    • ‘He could be the long reliever while he is groomed for a starting spot.’
    • ‘Despite the girl's resistance, her grandmother starts grooming her for the role.’
    • ‘The conclusion they drew was that the president was grooming his son for the presidency and setting the scene for his succession.’
    • ‘The manager should be concentrating on clearing his head of such inanities rather than talking of grooming his assistant coaches as candidates to succeed him.’
    • ‘Maybe this woman is grooming me, ready to move in to our flat as soon as I hand over the keys.’
    • ‘Her high-flying film success has not stopped speculation that ultimately he is grooming her for a more substantial role than consort, mother and co-star.’
    • ‘But in a world where grooming students for a career and making the arts responsive to business are key government priorities, a little artistic vision goes a long way.’
    • ‘So while she grooms her son for leadership, she is also fulfilling her own destiny.’
    • ‘He was appointed to a position he wasn't groomed for at a time no one would have chosen to take the helm.’
    • ‘Should the writer ease onto the page, as if he were groomed for it?’
    • ‘He said the current system made it difficult for any coach to groom players as they could be snatched by those with too much money.’
    • ‘These misguided criminals are groomed for success, not failure, and they expected to die.’
    • ‘By the late 1980s, she was grooming him as her successor.’
    • ‘Our in-house training programmes form an excellent platform for grooming employees to shoulder higher responsibilities.’
    • ‘After being spotted at a karate competition in 1964, he was groomed for a spin-off from the series.’
    • ‘In fact, he had to live away from his parents since the time he was three, following a strict schedule that was intended to groom him for the throne.’
    • ‘They will need to be against an Abbeyside team being groomed for glory on the back of outstanding Under-21 and minor success.’
    • ‘He was not groomed for the all rounder role, but has simply filled it extremely well when called upon.’
    prepare, prime, make ready, ready, condition, tailor
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    1. 2.1 (of a paedophile) prepare (a child) for a meeting, especially via an Internet chat room, with the intention of committing a sexual offence.

noun

  • 1A person employed to take care of horses.

    • ‘He was about to ask for an explanation from Ed, the head groom, when Caroline faced him.’
    • ‘Incidentally, owners tended to employ horsemen or grooms who were on the short side as that made their charges look so much bigger and farmers always liked to see a big stallion.’
    • ‘The Stakes will include $830 for the groom of the winning horse.’
    • ‘Ireland has produced more than its share of quality horses, breeders, trainers, grooms, farriers, jockeys, head lads and punters.’
    • ‘Mr Toms, the head groom, met them at the entrance to the stables.’
    • ‘Stacey chose a dapple gray horse, and a groom saddled the horse up for her.’
    • ‘Shrugging his shoulders up, he dismounted at Arnaud's, and handed his horse to the groom to take in.’
    • ‘I get my own horse, with a personal groom to take care of it.’
    • ‘Grateful that the grooms from the other stables had taken care of their horses that day, they climbed wearily into their rooms in the hayloft.’
    • ‘They continued into camp, dismounted at the stables, and handed off their horses to grooms.’
    • ‘Dante and I went back to the stables and the grooms put up our horses.’
    • ‘But here, the grooms took care of almost everything, and they thought that a lady had no place doing stable chores.’
    • ‘He said that because since the training facility does not open until November 1 that there would not be any problem accommodating the horsemen or their grooms.’
    • ‘In the other painting he had another, lesser artist overpaint both her figure and his own, substituting grooms holding the horses.’
    • ‘There were many pens like mine all over the place, each with a horse and a groom.’
    • ‘She's got countless maids, butlers, a chauffeur, a horse groom, and a million other servants as well!’
    • ‘Handing my horse over to the grooms I slung my saddlebags over one shoulder.’
    • ‘The minute he was able to, he dashed away to the stables, calling for the grooms to saddle his horse.’
    • ‘The only persons permitted to be close enough to touch the horses are trainers, jockeys, grooms, stewards, and course attendants.’
    • ‘Though Campbell and the messenger continued to confer, calling a groom for the horse and hurrying into the house, I heard no more.’
    stable hand, stableman, stable lad, stable boy, stable girl
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  • 2A bridegroom.

    • ‘Neither of the prospective grooms plays a prominent role in this drawing-room deal.’
    • ‘The prospective groom along with his parents can meet the suitable girl.’
    • ‘We will talk with the groom's sister here in Atlanta.’
    • ‘Otherwise, he feels more like an observer than the groom at his own wedding.’
    • ‘The groom's parents, however, paid for the bulk of the reception.’
    • ‘The groom's parents give the couple a big party at their home.’
    • ‘Weddings are usually large, expensive affairs paid for by the groom's family.’
    • ‘The wedding ceremony can include the gift of a coin from the groom to the bride to acknowledge this role.’
    • ‘Pete seems to have transformed into a handsome, rugged groom.’
    • ‘The groom is a graduate of Barry University; he is a police officer for the Fort Lauderdale Police Department.’
    • ‘The proud groom is a graduate of the University of Texas.’
    • ‘Forty-five minutes before the wedding, the groom's father parked his car and swore.’
    • ‘The groom's family brings gifts and money to the family of the bride.’
    • ‘The groom's sister wore a full-length azure blue strapless dress.’
    • ‘The groom is a graduate of the University of Delaware.’
    • ‘My friend reckoned his presence was a mere sop to the groom's parents.’
    • ‘The groom wore red and the bride looked elegant in an old-fashioned riding habit.’
    • ‘The grooms wore tuxedos, as did the other men in the wedding party.’
    • ‘After marriage, the couple moves into the groom's father's village.’
    • ‘The groom also wears a traditional hat that is as colorful as the wedding gown.’
    bridegroom, new husband, husband-to-be
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  • 3British Any of various officials of the royal household.

Origin

Middle English (in the sense ‘boy’, later ‘man, male servant’): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

groom

/ɡruːm/