Definition of grok in English:

grok

verb

[WITH OBJECT]US
informal
  • 1Understand (something) intuitively or by empathy.

    ‘corporate leaders seemed to grok this concept fairly quickly’
    • ‘It can take months or years just to consciously grok your own experience, more so to effectively share it with someone else.’
    • ‘It fails to grok the economics of the entire enterprise.’
    • ‘We spend months, years, sometimes even lifetimes working up the comprehension and courage to utter those few words; it's unfair to expect that everyone will be able grok that info in just a few seconds.’
    • ‘I'd say an advanced undergrad could easily grok this book.’
    • ‘But many judges do not yet grok this, and maybe never will.’
    • ‘Except that a couple of British scientists recently did ‘theory of mind’ experiments with ravens and found that they, too, seemed to be able to grok complex stuff about a human gazer.’
    • ‘I feel I am one step closer to fully grokking the reality I inhabit.’
    • ‘It's remarkable that the editors didn't grok this basic fact, and put a halt to the entire ridiculous experiment before it even got started.’
    • ‘It's hard to envision neurasthenic pulling or other activity, but I don't grok Hegelian infinitesimals either.’
    • ‘In his excellent portrait of hacker psychology, he pointed out that hackers are far more likely to have cats than dogs, and adds that ‘it is widely grokked that cats have the hacker nature’.’
    • ‘And I grok some of the arguments against eating other farmed animals, too.’
    • ‘Very few people, though, know more than one or two worlds, because there's just so much to learn that unless you have to work in one of these worlds for more than a couple of years, you don't really grok it all.’
    • ‘When he saw Tablet PCs, he immediately grokked the benefit of using them for a project that we were planning.’
    • ‘So today I just grokked the job listings, vacuumed, got the cat some bath wipes and catnip and did other things.’
    • ‘I didn't get on with that Urban Shamanism type thing, but I do grok it.’
    • ‘Young adults transmit secret messages of desperately longed-for submission beneath their consciously expressed frustrations and resentments, but can't be counted on to grok that media celebrities are not, you know, real.’
    • ‘Nobody at the car place spoke English or grokked my stick-man drawing of the accident, so I indicated to one of the agents to follow me.’
    • ‘If there's a prosecutor in this country who groks the background and context of the specific operations destroyed by this crime, it's this guy.’
    • ‘Impatient people don't sit still and grok the whole page, check out the archives and figure out what's up.’
    • ‘She has raised some timely related issues, so we'll try to grok their intricacies and fold them into the discussion.’
    1. 1.1no object Establish a rapport.
      ‘nestling earth couple would like to find water brothers to grok with in peace’

Origin

1960s: a word invented by Robert Heinlein (1907–88), American author.

Pronunciation

grok

/ɡrɒk/