Definition of gripe in English:

gripe

verb

  • 1informal no object Complain about something in a persistent, irritating way.

    ‘it's no use griping about your boss or your pay’
    with direct speech ‘‘Holidays make no difference to Simon,’ Pat griped’
    • ‘He also told me that I need to apply myself to the main work of the group as people have been griping to him about my use of my laptop at work.’
    • ‘The local evening paper lavished praise on Oasis after their opening night in Aberdeen, but griped it would have been better value for money if the band talked more to the audience.’
    • ‘They might gripe about money and whinge over this and that, but at the end of the day, most of us just want to believe in something good.’
    • ‘Small businesses are always griping about big banks, sometimes justifiably.’
    • ‘Are you the sort of player who gripes and complains all the time about your putting?’
    • ‘You gripe under your breath about everything because you're so sensitive.’
    • ‘For nearly as long as there has been an entrepreneurial space industry, there has been griping and grousing about regulatory issues, as well as lobbying for legislation to resolve those flaws.’
    • ‘Television can make a fool of us all, but it was difficult to see what the boss was griping about.’
    • ‘We, nevertheless, inevitably find things about which to gripe and complain.’
    • ‘‘Everything was fine until you walked in,’ he griped some, before turning back to the communications panel.’
    • ‘Mortgage lenders gripe that conflicting state laws make it tough for them to operate coast to coast.’
    • ‘For weeks I griped and complained about the fact that my boxes hadn't arrived from England yet.’
    • ‘Even as authors griped about heavy-handed editing, readers complained that the articles were too long and too difficult - not edited enough.’
    • ‘The secret is simple: stop griping about the public sector and start viewing it as a source of business opportunities.’
    • ‘The much-anticipated finger-pointing began after the home loss - with players griping about the way teammates complain to the officials, playing time and chemistry.’
    • ‘He gripes that being a Canadian actor has limited the roles he has been offered.’
    • ‘Because his teammates got their share of shots, no one griped under their breath about the number Iverson took.’
    • ‘They were griping to the press last week, saying that if they were in trouble, they would have called the defence force and not the MPs.’
    • ‘I griped under my breath as I pulled the covers up to her shoulders.’
    • ‘A few of you were griping at the lack of ambiance at their Jazz Fest gig earlier this summer at Club Soda, so it's off to a real club setting we go.’
    • ‘She didn't complain or gripe often, but she always wanted to be part of the conversation, or always wanted someone who would listen to her.’
    • ‘Many women's sports administrators and officials constantly gripe and complain about the lack of support they receive from sponsorship and the media.’
    • ‘We chunter through each day, grumbling, griping and groaning.’
    • ‘The stinginess of the portion left me grumbling and griping.’
    • ‘They will grumble, they will gripe, they will moan about waiting lists and rotten food.’
    protest, grumble, moan, whine, bleat, carp, cavil, lodge a complaint, make a complaint, make a fuss
    complain, grumble, moan, groan, protest, whine, bleat
    View synonyms
  • 2usually as adjective gripingwith object Affect with gastric or intestinal pain.

    ‘spasmodic griping pains’
    • ‘Prune juice started griping my stomach in 2 hours.’
    • ‘It started to gripe my stomach too.’
    • ‘Nowadays an infusion of coriander is recommended for relieving flatulence, bloating and griping pains, as well as for suppressing the lingering smell of garlic.’
    • ‘Sometimes the griping pain was so severe that she screamed and tossed in the bed.’
  • 3archaic with object Grasp tightly; clutch.

    ‘Hilyard griped his dagger’
    grasp, clutch, hold, clasp, grasp hold of, lay hold of, take hold of, latch on to, grab, seize, clench, cling to, catch, catch at, get one's hands on, pluck
    View synonyms
  • 4Nautical
    with object Secure (a boat) with gripes.

    • ‘The boat must be fully griped in at the davits and the harbour stop pins must be out.’
  • 5Sailing
    no object (of a ship) turn to face the wind despite the efforts of the helmsman.

    • ‘I had occasion to observe the vessel griped to windward considerably.’

noun

  • 1informal A minor complaint.

    ‘my only gripe is the size of the page numbers’
    • ‘If we had a minor gripe it was certainly not with the food but with the service.’
    • ‘I still have a gripe with journalists who consistently refuse to refer to documents like those above when constructing their various conspiracy theories.’
    • ‘Is it permitted to air a few gripes?’
    • ‘At present my biggest gripe is the lack of facilities.’
    • ‘There are some minor gripes I do have with the game play.’
    • ‘Our minor gripes were far out-weighed by some superb service and good quality food.’
    • ‘Passengers pointed to overcrowding, delays, poor conditions and frequency as their main gripes.’
    • ‘But if the only gripe you can have about watching two discs of soccer highlights is that the music sucks, it's not a bad complaint.’
    • ‘These are all relatively minor gripes, admittedly.’
    • ‘Though it seemed a legitimate gripe, complaining did no good.’
    • ‘The main menu is fine, but I have few minor gripes about the control setup.’
    • ‘But minor gripes aside, this is a great, original film.’
    • ‘Apart from English gripes about the weather, the main source of criticism was the cost of holidaying in Scotland, with one in three continental tourists complaining about value for money.’
    • ‘But these are minor gripes and most people won't notice or care about it.’
    • ‘Of the five local opinions sought on the operations of the Council, traffic and parking gripes predominated.’
    • ‘This is not a moan or a gripe but something that's been puzzling me of late.’
    • ‘Really, my biggest gripe is the lack of extras on this DVD, especially a commentary track.’
    • ‘The first reaction was the violence and what you see in the media but the most telling aspect is that a couple of people said the majority of the protesters have legitimate gripes.’
    • ‘But all gripes aside, it is still an effective and moving portrait.’
    • ‘Privatisation was one of the group's main gripes, according to the memorandum.’
    complaint, grumble, moan, groan, grievance, objection, protest, whine
    View synonyms
  • 2mass noun Gastric or intestinal pain; colic.

    ‘seeing your tiny baby suffering with wind and gripe’
    • ‘Plenty of time for late night blogging while coping with teething, chronic gripe and insomnia from 4am feeds.’
    • ‘Andres was suffering from gripe and sinus problems for a couple weeks.’
    • ‘When I brought him home he slept and then he started to cry loudly and I thought he had gripe.’
  • 3archaic An act of grasping something tightly.

    ‘he seized me by the arms with a rude gripe’
    • ‘Do we know that there is a possibility, on any terms, of unclasping the firm gripe of this little Hand, which was laid upon me before I came into the world?’
    • ‘Holding me with a strong gripe by the cord that tied my hands, he with many oaths threatened to kill me immediately if I would not be quiet.’
    grasp, hold, clutch, clasp, clench
    View synonyms
  • 4gripesNautical
    Lashings securing a boat in its place on deck or in davits.

    • ‘As soon as we lowered the starboard action boat to the next deck the gripes of the boat caught and we had to cut them with an axe.’
    • ‘The whole operation is performed by one man only in the boat, who, by simply paying off a rope, unlashes and frees the boat from the ship's gripes.’

Origin

Old English grīpan ‘grasp, clutch’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch grijpen, German greifen ‘seize’, also to grip and grope. gripe (sense 2 of the verb) dates from the 17th century; gripe (sense 1 of the verb), of US origin, dates from the 1930s.

Pronunciation

gripe

/ɡrʌɪp/