Definition of grip in English:

grip

verb

[with object]
  • 1Take and keep a firm hold of; grasp tightly.

    ‘his knuckles were white as he gripped the steering wheel’
    • ‘Justin grinned, staring out into space, his hands still gripping tightly onto the handles of the controls.’
    • ‘He sat straight as his hands gripped the steering wheel tightly.’
    • ‘Suddenly, he grips my arm firmly and pulls me to a corner.’
    • ‘Jonathon grips my hand more firmly and we make our way into the building.’
    • ‘Intense drivers, their eyes affixed on the taillights in front of them, sat hunched forward gripping their steering wheels tightly.’
    • ‘His biggest problem is that he grips the club too tightly.’
    • ‘As I get on my bike, I grip the bars tightly and close my eyes.’
    • ‘He stood for the remainder of the session and, because he was gripping the gun too tightly at first, missed the entire target board several times.’
    • ‘He was also carrying a plastic carrier bag which was gripped in his fist.’
    • ‘My arm was suddenly gripped very hard by the man on my right.’
    • ‘I was gripping the steering wheel so hard that my knuckles had turned white.’
    • ‘With his hands firmly gripping the high back of the pilot's seat, Howard stared transfixed out the sloping front window.’
    • ‘He looked down at the bottle, still gripped tightly in his grasp.’
    • ‘He gripped Ryan's hand strongly, tears poured down their mud and blood streaked faces.’
    • ‘Ryder's hand gripped the steering wheel tighter as she hit the accelerator hard.’
    • ‘Joey held the map in one hand and had his violin case gripped firmly in the other.’
    • ‘Martina tightly grips the handle of her briefcase.’
    • ‘His fingers suddenly gripped my chin, forcing us to lock gazes.’
    • ‘He grabbed her wrists and gripped them tightly.’
    • ‘Her shoulders were straight and she was gripping her purse rather tightly, looking extremely strained.’
    grasp, clutch, hold, clasp, grasp hold of, lay hold of, take hold of, latch on to, grab, seize, clench, cling to, catch, catch at, get one's hands on, pluck
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1no object Maintain a firm contact, especially by friction.
      ‘a sole that really grips well on wet rock’
      • ‘The stability control system also triggers a reflex to dry the brakes when streets are wet, so they grip better.’
      • ‘The Henrys Fork Wading shoes are made for just this sort of job, with a thick synthetic felt sole that grips.’
      • ‘Secondly, I noticed that the rear tyre rim was gripping slightly and I thought it might be out of alignment.’
      • ‘It grips very well, making driving around those twisty B-roads a real pleasure.’
      • ‘Tyres fail to grip when brakes are applied and contact with the road surface is poor.’
      • ‘We think the most likely cause is contamination of the brake disc pads at the noisy corner of the car, which could prevent them from gripping properly and cause a whining sound as they slip.’
      • ‘Combine that with little weight over the wheels, tyres that need to warm up before they grip properly and a wet road and things can get very - er - interesting.’
  • 2(of an emotion or situation) have a strong or adverse effect on.

    ‘she was gripped by a feeling of excitement’
    ‘the country was gripped by recession’
    • ‘A sudden feeling of fear gripped me, as though I was being watched.’
    • ‘Here, Ben details the hysteria and fear gripping Hong Kong, a small taste of which spread to Southampton's Chinese community this week.’
    • ‘A feeling of sadness and fear gripped Jamie and he closed his eyes as tears fell down his cheeks.’
    • ‘I had no problems imagining the fear gripping those on board.’
    • ‘The America we see today is that if a nation gripped by fear.’
    • ‘As I stood with the mist hiding all the views of the hills around and the sad looking grey water slipping over the golden sands of Morecambe Bay, I felt misery and pity grip me.’
    • ‘Briefly, the moonlight was obscured by a cloud and an unreasonable fear gripped me as I realised I could not see the statues.’
    • ‘Once, the political elite was gripped by fear and loathing of the working classes.’
    • ‘He said they were not the actions of a man gripped by panic.’
    • ‘Perhaps you are gripped by anxiety before giving a talk.’
    • ‘As I see her growing old everyday, a fear grips me, stings my heart and threatens to tear me apart.’
    • ‘A sense of sorrow and outrage has gripped this multiracial community.’
    • ‘An air of disbelief and sadness gripped the community.’
    • ‘Sudden fear gripped her and almost overwhelmed the suffering her body was experiencing, but wonder and joy quickly replaced this.’
    • ‘Most of all, other conglomerates are gripped by anxiety over who will be the next target.’
    • ‘There is no doubt that despair has gripped the cricket fraternity in the Caribbean but strangely none has come up with a remedy.’
    • ‘Panic gripped the village and 46 persons including 40 women took shelter in a shrine.’
    • ‘There was no loss of life but panic gripped the area.’
    • ‘An unbearable sadness grips my heart that I can't shake.’
    • ‘Sometimes fear and anxiety grip the individual late at night.’
    afflict, affect, take over, beset, rack, torment, convulse
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    1. 2.1 Firmly hold the attention or interest of.
      ‘we were gripped by the drama’
      • ‘The tragedy of the six characters is gripping in its own way.’
      • ‘Sporting a writing staff made up of television all-stars, the show is intelligent, gripping and most importantly human all at the same time.’
      • ‘It's a long play - three hours - but quite gripping.’
      • ‘It's not a nice film, but it's definitely gripping.’
      • ‘But the story of their life - the dilemmas they faced, the courage or weakness they showed - is gripping and unaccountably affecting.’
      • ‘I was gripped from start to dramatic, uncompromising finish.’
      • ‘The animation is breathtaking, the character development robust, and the story-line gripping from start to finish.’
      • ‘The result is a film that you admire from a distance rather than one that grips your attention or touches your heart.’
      • ‘This sort of information no doubt grips the many Van Gogh obsessives.’
      • ‘I didn't find the plot particularly gripping, but the level of period detail in the book's descriptive passages was excellent.’
      • ‘The heist scene - when it finally comes - is reasonably gripping, albeit generic, but everything that surrounds it is very dull indeed.’
      • ‘But it is this November's presidential election which will grip global attention as never before.’
      • ‘The case has gripped and repulsed the nation in equal measure.’
      • ‘The stories are gripping and in some cases disturbing.’
      • ‘Their exploits gripped the country's attention and were written about in countless articles and books.’
      • ‘It was gripping, thought-provoking, and genuinely entertaining, if you take the word in its broad sense.’
      • ‘This has been the most gripping novel I have ever read.’
      • ‘This is a compelling, human story that has really gripped the attention of a lot of people.’
      • ‘The movie should be dull, but instead it's fast-paced and gripping.’
      • ‘The more I read about the debate between ‘intelligent design’ and evolution, the more tightly science grips me.’
      engrossing, enthralling, entrancing, absorbing, riveting, captivating, spellbinding, bewitching, fascinating, compulsive, addictive, compelling, mesmerizing, arresting
      engross, enthral, entrance, absorb, rivet, spellbind, hold spellbound, bewitch, fascinate, hold, catch, compel, mesmerize, arrest, ensnare, enrapture
      View synonyms

noun

  • 1in singular A firm hold; a tight grasp.

    ‘his arm was held in a vice-like grip’
    figurative ‘the icy grip of winter’
    • ‘More and more Ilkley's vice-like grip was loosened.’
    • ‘Throughout the ordeal Mrs Malgarin kept a tight grip on her handbag and the attacker eventually fled empty-handed towards Mulberry Grove.’
    • ‘With a vice grip around her neck, she was unable to breathe.’
    • ‘Biting back my sobs I reached for the door but was stopped by his strong grip on my wrist.’
    • ‘I ignored him and proceeded down the stairs when I felt a firm grip on my wrist, jerking me back.’
    • ‘Suddenly his wrist was caught in a vice-like grip, tight and painful.’
    • ‘I began to loosen the tight grip my hands had left on the sides of the window.’
    • ‘Winter is keeping a firm grip on the South Island as snow isolates Dunedin for the second time in a week and restricts travel around the lower part of the country.’
    • ‘The girl let her grip loosen and slide away from his arm.’
    • ‘She let her grip loosen enough for the boy to scramble out from under her.’
    • ‘Jonathon's vice-like grip tightened, and suddenly there was no pain, just cold numbness.’
    • ‘Police have issued a warning to local women to keep a firm grip on their handbags after four separate incidents in Lancaster and Morecambe.’
    • ‘Vicki turned to go and suddenly felt a tight grip on her arm.’
    • ‘I for one would like to shake their hands, while keeping a firm grip on my wallet, of course!’
    • ‘Walk down a city street without keeping a tight grip on your wallet or handbag and somebody will rob you.’
    • ‘A plucky woman kept a tight grip on her handbag during a tussle with a would-be robber.’
    • ‘Still in pain, his hand nevertheless retained its iron grip on my arm.’
    • ‘He cleared his throat, and I noticed his grip tighten on the wheel.’
    • ‘I maintained my grip until they were only at a meter's distance from us.’
    • ‘Tremendous relief washed over Jim as the attacker's grip lessened to nothing.’
    grasp, hold, clutch, clasp, clench
    handshake, hand grip, hand clasp
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A manner of holding something.
      ‘I've changed my grip and my backswing’
      • ‘Nothing is more central to playing properly than changing your grip.’
      • ‘It's very important to work with a pro shop professional who will help you develop a grip that allows your hand to relax in the ball.’
      • ‘Once the proper grip is achieved then it becomes essential to develop the right stance.’
      • ‘Grasp the handles with a neutral grip and sit back on the bench, chest out high.’
      • ‘A weak grip causes the clubface to open during the backswing and remain open in the downswing.’
      • ‘Preparing your ball and hand to have the proper grip is part of your pre-bowling and pre-shot routine.’
      • ‘It is very important that the grip should be as relaxed as possible using only sufficient pressure to hold the bowl firmly, never with tension.’
      • ‘Happy that he'd finally figured it out, he tested his grip on the weapon, and swung it experimentally in the air.’
      • ‘If the opponent cannot control you through a grip, he cannot overpower you or apply his technique.’
      • ‘Gloves can also magnify a problem in your grip, so a proper fit is paramount.’
      • ‘It requires a firm and correct grip and proper arm, shoulder and trunk motion, all with the feet in the right place on the court at the right time.’
      • ‘To get the proper grip for this swing, adjust your right hand on the shaft until you can see all five fingernails.’
      • ‘First, their hands and fingers are not large enough and long enough to get a proper grip.’
      • ‘Luckily I controlled the fall, and took a better grip on the rope, bruising my arms and thighs in the process.’
      • ‘Wood is experimenting with a split-finger grip on his changeup so he can use the same motion as on his fastball and slow down the pitch.’
      • ‘Jump up and take an overhand, shoulder-width grip on a pull-up bar.’
      • ‘He made himself level the remaining gun at the words, changed his grip on the pearl handle.’
      • ‘Hinge the club slightly in the backswing, then allow the grip to serve as a reminder to hold that position past impact.’
      • ‘He has found a comfortable grip on his sinker, which consistently gets ground balls.’
      • ‘The problem was not pain but the peculiar feeling of an unfamiliar grip, especially at the top of the backswing.’
      handshake, hand grip, hand clasp
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2mass noun The ability of something, especially a wheel or shoe, to maintain a firm contact with a surface.
      ‘these shoes have got no grip’
      • ‘Cars run on skinny snow tyres in Sweden, with sharp studs to penetrate the icy surface and find good grip underneath.’
      • ‘Some of my leather shoes had absolutely no grip.’
      • ‘The faster you go, the harder it is to maintain your grip.’
      • ‘The wheels rarely scrabble for grip even on the most treacherous surfaces.’
      • ‘The front engine-rear drive layout ensures improved grip and better traction under acceleration as the weight of the car transfers to the rear.’
      • ‘The saturated leather and damp timber cause the crews feet to slip, so some opt to remove their shoes for better grip.’
      • ‘Before the crew could correct the problem, the front cog wheel lost its grip and the engine turned on its side, releasing the coach.’
      • ‘Network Rail has installed new track and removed nearby trees to tackle the autumn problem of leaves on the line which can cause train wheels to lose grip.’
      • ‘Mr Clayton claimed that too little sand was used in the resin compound, so instead of giving extra grip, the surface became smooth and slippery.’
      • ‘It also allows for more pattern contact to improve uphill grip without reducing glide.’
      • ‘This is a well-balanced car with good mechanical grip to make the most of the smooth track surface.’
      • ‘Only the main trunk roads had been gritted, meaning anyone using other routes had to contend with icy and slippy surfaces that offered little grip.’
      • ‘Normal running shoes offer little grip in the mud and on the steep hilly sections and we saw loads of folk struggling and slipping.’
      • ‘The shoes have pretty good grip and are Gortex, so they should be pretty good in wet conditions.’
      • ‘When wheelspin is detected, the power is distributed accordingly to the wheel with most grip.’
      • ‘However, as the transmission senses loss of traction, so more power is sent to the wheels with the most grip.’
      • ‘On the out lap, I lost front wheel grip and nearly went onto the race track.’
      • ‘Crampons fix onto your shoes to improve grip.’
      • ‘When drivers find a way to slow down the rear axle, they can gain more grip in the rear wheels and improve the car's handling.’
      • ‘When it rains it's difficult to spot which surface has good grip and which doesn't.’
      traction, purchase, friction, adhesion, resistance
      View synonyms
  • 2in singular Effective control over something.

    ‘he had to take a grip on his nerves’
    • ‘In fact, the minister in his stance on selling off Aer Lingus but keeping a tight grip on the second terminal is living to his own expressed views on these key issues.’
    • ‘It vividly portrayed life as it was decades ago, when Catholicism had a firm grip on our society.’
    • ‘He maintained an iron grip on Russia and the east European satellites Russia controlled, until his death in March 1953.’
    • ‘She was in Russia before the Socialists lost their iron grip on people there.’
    • ‘Thousands of public houses agreed to ban Happy Hour promotions yesterday, but campaigners said more action was needed to get a firm grip on binge drinking.’
    • ‘Should anyone be surprised that popular culture holds such a firm grip on teenagers?’
    • ‘Flynn wants to keep a tight grip on the purse strings.’
    • ‘Can there be a greater temptation for politicians than to have control of an asset that may ensure they keep a grip on power?’
    • ‘It seems that the Liberals are not only running the country now but have a tight grip on manipulating the media to suit its narrow agenda.’
    • ‘In Wakefield, Labour retained its strong grip on power, keeping 17 of the 20 seats it was defending.’
    • ‘With operations in more than 80 countries and a turnover last year of 15.8 billion, Michelin has a firm grip on its market.’
    • ‘The Conservatives kept a firm grip on all nine local seats as they strengthened their overall position on Bradford Council.’
    • ‘Beyond that, the thugs are organized in a manner designed to maintain a tight grip on power.’
    • ‘My nutritionist advised that in order to be in optimum health for conceiving a baby, I must take a grip on my addiction.’
    • ‘The Conservatives easily overturned the Labour group's tentative grip on power and took control with a majority of 17 seats in the town hall.’
    • ‘Unfortunately for taxpayers, the authority has yet to get a proper grip on its finances.’
    • ‘It is true, of course, that the vice president would say anything and do anything in order to maintain his grip on power.’
    • ‘They had another fine opportunity to take an early lead shortly afterwards as the home side failed to take a grip on the match.’
    • ‘Cocaine culture has taken a firmer grip on society according to new statistics released by the Home Office which show a 16 per cent rise in offences last year.’
    • ‘He was still miserable and alone, and despair maintained its grip upon him.’
    control, power, mastery, hold, stranglehold, clutches, domination, dominion, command, influence, possession
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    1. 2.1 An understanding of something.
      ‘you've got a good grip on what's going on’
      • ‘In your pathetic grip on socializing and pitiful understanding of how to present yourself, you will always be five steps behind everyone else.’
      • ‘As for me, at least I've finally gotten a grip on exactly why this phenomenon has enjoyed such staying power.’
      • ‘They have a reasonably good grip on the philosophy of science - far better than my own, anyway.’
      • ‘So it's essential to have a grip, a clear understanding, of what your values and priorities are.’
      • ‘The powerlessness and frustration of the local police, who appear to have no grip at all on who their enemy might be, resonates elsewhere.’
      • ‘This is a tribute to the corporation's grip on the culture and polity of Britain.’
      understanding of, comprehension of, perception of, awareness of, grasp of, apprehension of, conception of, realization of, knowledge of, cognizance of, ken of, mastery of, command of
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  • 3A part or attachment by which something is held in the hand.

    ‘handlebar grips’
    • ‘The handle has a slightly flared hilt that both enhances the grip and protects the fingers during use.’
    • ‘It also has a unique grip for added control, supreme ventilation, and an elastic wrist wrap.’
    • ‘The grips of swords were made of several materials.’
    • ‘Their new line of ivory polymer grips are difficult to tell from the real thing.’
    • ‘All clubs have smaller grips and lightweight steel shafts.’
    • ‘The pistol grip is ergonomically shaped, well designed, and quite comfortable.’
    • ‘This device was simply a gas grill igniter with finger grips added, sold as a pain-reliever.’
    • ‘One-piece aluminum or steel trowels often have handles covered with soft rubber or plastic grips.’
    • ‘In keeping with the gun's modular component design, other types of buttstocks and grips can he attached if desired.’
    • ‘Maybe that's why I'm always working with my clubs, still experimenting with new grips and shafts, trying to get the weight just right.’
    • ‘They taught me how to use special cutlery with rubber grips on so that I could hold them more easily, how to dress and wash and how to do wheelchair transfers and even simple things like how to lay on my stomach comfortably.’
    • ‘There are also some rubberised grips on either side.’
    • ‘It had wide, angular handle bars; edgy, rubber hand grips; and fat tires with treads!’
    • ‘Can conventional putters be modified with longer shafts and appropriate grips, or must we regular guys take out another advance on our allowance and buy a new stick?’
    • ‘The vertical alignment of the optics and the molded finger grips fits the shape of the user's hand.’
    • ‘The little guy managed to sidestep the front of the bike but got winged in the gut by one of the handlebar grips.’
    • ‘A dragon carved into the hilts of the blades and the grip of the pistol marked their individuality.’
    • ‘I've even had - get this - the bar ends and grips stolen off of my handlebars.’
    • ‘As with the ram's horn grips, these stocks are perfectly fitted and shaped.’
    • ‘A dome-shaped metal boss was set in the middle of each shield with a grip running across the underside and attached both to the boss and to the wood.’
    1. 3.1British A hairgrip.
      • ‘Volumes of spidery dressed hair piled up around a seashell grip.’
      • ‘Mid-length to long hair is twisted and knotted into a mass of lively little ringlets, then twisted and fixed with grips.’
      • ‘Conceal the grips by pushing them right underneath the roll.’
      • ‘He provided pretty grips for her tumbling hair, ribbons with silk bows and even, once, a delightful dress quite suitable for royalty.’
      • ‘She was pulling grips out of her hair and sticking them between her lips, biting them with her bright white teeth.’
  • 4A travelling bag.

    ‘a grip crammed with new clothes’
    • ‘A policeman captured a burglar yesterday afternoon just in time to prevent his escaping with a grip containing part of the $1,000 haul made at a robbery on Saturday.’
    • ‘He has with him a grip containing clothing and papers.’
    • ‘He brought along a grip filled with a suit of extra clothing.’
    travelling bag, bag, holdall, overnight bag, overnighter, flight bag, kitbag, gladstone bag, valise, portmanteau
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  • 5A stagehand in a theatre.

    • ‘I am a grip and lighting designer working in the DC area.’
    • ‘U.S. grips may belong to the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employes.’
    stagehand, theatrical assistant
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    1. 5.1 A member of a camera crew responsible for moving and setting up equipment.
      • ‘He is brushing shoulders with some of Britain's best-loved actors, working as a camera grip with ITV Yorkshire.’
      • ‘Another use for sandbags is for grips to sit on when they are taking another Union mandated break.’
      • ‘All my friends' daddies were stunt men and grips and second unit directors and bit players.’
      • ‘The biggest special effect in that film was accomplished by two grips pushing a 2x4 against a plywood door to make it bow in.’
      • ‘Damian gave up surfing and fine art to study film making in New York City, where he worked as a grip for several years.’

Phrases

  • come (or get) to grips with

    • 1Engage in combat with.

      ‘British forces never came to grips with the enemy’
      • ‘Only then could the elite of Britain's armed forces really get to grips with the enemy.’
      • ‘Irrespective of the nature and scope of our operations, we must prepare to fight Germany by actually coming to grips with and defeating her ground forces and definitely breaking her will to combat.’
      1. 1.1Begin to deal with or understand.
        ‘a real tough problem to come to grips with’
        • ‘Kitty is a huge force in Levin's life, helping him to come to grips with his lifelong struggle with faith and religion.’
        • ‘Unfortunately, neither candidate quite comes to grips with the underlying forces driving health costs higher.’
        • ‘There are also papers and exams that force the students to come to grips with the wider issues.’
        • ‘This raises a few practical problems that I really don't think Paul has got to grips with.’
        • ‘A partially-disabled legal expert has started a new business to help firms get to grips with tough new laws.’
        • ‘Last week I spent much of my Easter break trying to get to grips with all the financial paperwork that I've failed to deal with recently.’
        • ‘Meanwhile, at home Australians began coming to grips with their new place in the post-war world.’
        • ‘Nicola carried out on the spot interviews with many of the stallholders and got to grips with what makes them tick.’
        • ‘He reclaimed his life two years ago when he came to grips with his illness and devoted himself to helping others who were also homeless and H.I.V.-positive.’
        • ‘Make sure you have got to grips with the contents of one lesson before moving on to the next.’
        deal with, cope with, handle, grasp, grasp the nettle of
        View synonyms
  • get a grip

    • informal usually in imperativeKeep or recover one's self-control.

      ‘get a grip, guys!’
      • ‘But he got a grip in time for the post-match photos.’
      • ‘And face it, get a grip, you can never go back home again.’
      • ‘Before you talk about ghost towns, you guys need to get a grip.’
      • ‘Then I thought, this guy is a heavyweight cultural icon, better get a grip and make an effort to take it seriously.’
      • ‘And I know that some people are having a far worse time of things at the moment, so I really need to get a grip and put things in perspective.’
      • ‘My advice to Hollywood is to get a grip and move on.’
      • ‘I started smoking again during this period as it was a way of escaping from the noise for five minutes and getting a grip until I went back inside.’
      • ‘In the third year, I got a grip and worked really hard, but then the Easter holiday before my finals, my granddad got sick and I wasn't allowed to see him in hospital.’
      • ‘I better get a grip before I tread a regrettable step.’
      • ‘I felt like I'd just cheated on a faithful lover of 20 years before I internally slapped myself and got a grip.’
      compose oneself, recover one's composure, regain one's composure, control oneself, recover one's self-control, regain one's self-control, pull oneself together, keep one's head, simmer down, cool down, cool off, take it easy
      View synonyms
  • in the grip of

    • Dominated or affected by something undesirable or adverse.

      ‘Britain was in the grip of a crime wave’
      • ‘Italy has been in the grip of a cold spell for several days, and shortly after the fire began, snow began falling.’
      • ‘When she returned New Zealand was in the grip of the Depression of the thirties with high unemployment.’
      • ‘Is it any wonder the country is in the grip of so much appeasement, irrationality and ignorance?’
      • ‘The clinic is already under extreme pressure because Manchester is in the grip of a syphilis and gonorrhoea outbreak.’
      • ‘The area is in the grip of alcohol, illegal drugs and chronic unemployment.’
      • ‘Bolton is in the grip of a mumps outbreak with more cases diagnosed in the first five months of the year than in the whole of 2004.’
      • ‘By then, that lovely but vulnerable young woman was in the grip of a depression almost too strong to shake.’
      • ‘The end of the trial, however, has given us an insight into how parts of urban Britain are in the grip of a crimewave the law barely touches.’
      • ‘As the whole nation is in the grip of a grave crisis of credibility, there is a pressing need to prioritize honesty.’
      • ‘Hampshire could be in the grip of a drought in just six weeks' time.’
  • lose one's grip

    • Become unable to understand or control one's situation.

      ‘an elderly person who seems to be losing his grip’
      • ‘I was feeling really unwell, like everything was starting to spin out of control and I was losing my grip…’
      • ‘Yes, this can be seen in our society, where even politicians lose their grip and fail to control their rage.’
      • ‘She could feel herself losing her grip on the situation.’
      • ‘‘I think he's lost his grip and the government has lost its way,’ said Mr Howard.’
      • ‘And if her newest release is any guide, she's not about to lose her grip anytime soon.’
      • ‘Administrators appeared to have lost their grip.’
      • ‘This hasn't stopped columnists wondering aloud if the Prime Minister is losing his grip.’
      • ‘It's a common misconception that Elvis got fat immediately and lost his grip.’
      • ‘‘Drugs are ruining society,’ Mr Taggart said, while maintaining that police were not losing their grip.’
      • ‘Anyone who believes that the country currently has a more socially polarizing climate now than in 1970 is, well, either lying or lost their grip on reality.’

Origin

Old English grippa (verb), gripe ‘grasp, clutch’ (noun), gripa ‘handful, sheath’; related to gripe.

Pronunciation

grip

/ɡrɪp/