Definition of grievance in English:

grievance

noun

  • 1A real or imagined cause for complaint, especially unfair treatment.

    ‘a website which enabled staff to air their grievances’
    • ‘Mazibuko promised the unions that the City would look into the workers' grievances.’
    • ‘A NEW police surgery to allow residents to air their grievances about crime has been launched in Horsforth.’
    • ‘The government was also aware that workers had genuine grievances.’
    • ‘Beware of perceived grievances that have everything to do with pride, envy, and honor and nothing to do with reality.’
    • ‘But the main grievance - excessive bank charges - remains.’
    • ‘Many urban people have the view that farmers are constantly complaining but they do seem to have a genuine grievance about their plight at present.’
    • ‘They have a long list of grievances, whether they're real or not, or imagined.’
    • ‘A discontented student body frequently boycotted classes over various grievances, such as discriminatory practices in medicine.’
    • ‘We could set up a public forum to discuss these issues and allow grievances to be aired.’
    • ‘No, this is a genuine grievance that has existed, as we have seen from the applications to the Commission, for twenty years or more.’
    • ‘Such movements aimed primarily to address specific grievances.’
    • ‘Earlier this month, he was given the perfect opportunity to air his grievances in public when he appeared before magistrates in Guildford, charged with the same offence.’
    • ‘But airing those grievances publicly might actually encourage more attacks and make their lives harder.’
    • ‘When publicans turned up to air their grievances before a committee in Leinster House on April 26, they could hardly have wished for a more sympathetic audience.’
    • ‘‘There's no doubt rural communities had some genuine grievances,’ he added.’
    • ‘The rebels' failure to win sympathy from fellow officers is reassuring, but their grievances are real.’
    • ‘Grievances against universities are preferably resolved within the grievance procedure which universities have today.’
    • ‘Even if the estate management felt it had a genuine grievance, minor encroachments on estate land are common and generally ignored.’
    • ‘Students who took part in the protest over the poor educational facilities at this campus, aired their grievances with the Waterford News & Star.’
    • ‘Briony Norris, an environmental health officer at the pollution control unit, said around 50 per cent of people who lodged complaints had a genuine grievance.’
    injustice, unjust act, wrong, injury, ill, offence, disservice, unfairness, evil, outrage, atrocity, damage
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    1. 1.1 An official statement of a complaint over something believed to be wrong or unfair.
      ‘three pilots have filed grievances against the company’
      • ‘The players' association filed a grievance yesterday seeking to overturn the Anaheim Angels' suspension of left fielder Jose Guillen.’
      • ‘The Teamsters announced they would file grievances on behalf of the fired attendants who come from Local 2000.’
      • ‘The carrier claimed that even the pilots union agreed there was no merit to LaGrotte's grievance.’
      • ‘Of course she has now filed a grievance against me and we have a meeting with HR later this afternoon.’
      • ‘Mr. Yousry states that he did not at that time understand himself to have been suspended, and thus he did not approach his union concerning his status, nor did he file any grievance about it.’
      • ‘Under Regulation 15, part-time as well as full-time faculty members may seek redress from an elected faculty grievance committee.’
      • ‘The faculty association has filed a formal grievance with the University alleging the university broke its contract with faculty.’
      • ‘On the other hand, if police are involved or a license is revoked, the teacher will probably file a grievance with his union.’
      • ‘Engle says that when she filed a grievance, DWP managers denied her overtime pay, hassled her about the dress code and intimidated her by hovering around her workstation.’
      • ‘He was reprimanded for telling a judge in open court he would testify against a former client because he had filed a grievance against him.’
      • ‘After years of what he considered to be unfair treatment, Natelson filed a grievance with the University.’
      • ‘Likewise, there are clear problems with the confidentiality of the current grievance processes.’
      • ‘Prisoners must file a formal grievance to appeal a medical decision, since healthcare is intertwined with strictly correctional functions.’
      • ‘If a client feels he or she has been treated unfairly, there is the option of filing a grievance.’
      • ‘If the company were to dismiss you simply because you asked for a proper job description or submitted a grievance about your treatment, it would certainly be acting unlawfully.’
      • ‘After Benner filed a grievance through the St. Paul Police Federation, he was reinstated.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, the number of union grievances declined by 90 % over six months.’
      • ‘Upon receipt of this letter, several of the affected faculty members filed grievances with an appropriate faculty committee.’
      • ‘His seniority revoked and his union grievance rejected, he then decided to try the courts.’
      • ‘Prior to making these public allegations, no student actually filed a sexual harassment grievance against him.’
    2. 1.2 A feeling of resentment over something believed to be wrong or unfair.
      ‘he was nursing a grievance’
      • ‘A feeling of grievance can be real even when the grievance itself is not.’
      • ‘He does not generally harbour grievances or grudges and it is rare for him to finish a regatta with lingering feelings of resentment towards a rival competitor.’
      • ‘As Thomas Frank so convincingly proved in ‘What's The Matter With Kansas’ this sense of grievance is simply what makes guys like him tick.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, though, humans have a tendency to bear grudges and nurse grievances, even when the reasons for doing so are irrational.’
      • ‘Long a festering popular grievance, official corruption has reached endemic levels, with potentially explosive social consequences.’
      complaint, criticism, objection, protestation, charge, protest, grumble, moan, cavil, quibble, problem
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Origin

Middle English (also in the sense ‘injury’): from Old French grevance, from grever ‘to burden’ (see grieve).

Pronunciation

grievance

/ˈɡriːv(ə)ns/