Main definitions of greet in English

: greet1greet2

greet1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Give a polite word of recognition or sign of welcome when meeting (someone)

    ‘some of the customers greeted the barman in Gaelic’
    • ‘Known for their hospitality, the villagers and shop owners always greet visitors warmly and loudly in Mandarin Chinese.’
    • ‘Stefan greets me enthusiastically: ‘Welcome to the office, this is where it all happens!’’
    • ‘The cashiers were friendly, enthusiastically greeting customers and waving them on their way all in the traditional American style.’
    • ‘‘Welcome to Beirut,’ Shepherd says as he greets me later the same morning, dressed in his chef's whites.’
    • ‘Walking upstairs, he met a couple of neighbours, who greeted him in a polite way.’
    • ‘Giles looked more than a little stunned to see his welcoming committee all greeting him at once.’
    • ‘Diego was greeted enthusiastically by Rosa as he opened the door the next afternoon.’
    • ‘Familiar faces hove into view and the barman greets me by name even though I've not been here for eight months.’
    • ‘His PR officer greets all guests with a professional smile.’
    • ‘He began at 6.30 am, greeting men arriving for work at the naval yard in nearby Portsmouth.’
    • ‘Casey spun around to see Lori, Jenny and Alex walking up to greet her, their faces beaming and welcoming.’
    • ‘I walked into the amphitheatre bar and the barman greeted me.’
    • ‘My new boss owned the small PR agency and he greeted me with a broad, welcoming smile. I really liked him.’
    • ‘In the village street, many people stopped to greet me and welcome my brother and his wife.’
    • ‘You're greeted by an attractive person who asks you how you are, and seems interested in your answer.’
    • ‘When we landed in Ramstein, Germany, there was no one to greet us or welcome us back.’
    • ‘Smiling customs and immigration officers were pleasant and greeted us with welcoming gestures.’
    • ‘Several of the company had smiled at her in recognition and a few were hurrying over to greet her.’
    • ‘Upon entry, we were immediately greeted by several waiters and offered the table of our choice.’
    • ‘I was greeted at the door by Sean, officially the hottest guy on earth.’
    say hello to, address, salute, hail, halloo
    welcome, meet, receive
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[with object and adverbial]Receive or acknowledge (something) in a specified way.
      ‘everyone greeted this idea warmly’
      • ‘This news was greeted with a resounding cheer from the pub.’
      • ‘His resignation was greeted with joy in some quarters at the university.’
      • ‘This is why we should greet with interest the news that schools could be allowed to stagger their lesson times to ease the traffic chaos caused by the school run.’
      • ‘That would be one scientific breakthrough that I would greet with open arms.’
      • ‘There was always a sense of underlying dissatisfaction in the reviews that greeted X-Men.’
      • ‘But this is not a phrase that is greeted with enthusiasm by Sharon Moore.’
      • ‘No stranger to publicity, Wilson was most gratified by the media frenzy that greeted this apparent heresy.’
      • ‘The far right party's victory was greeted with dismay by the Council's political leaders.’
      • ‘His article was greeted with outrage by the scientific establishment.’
      • ‘The news was greeted with dismay by parents' representatives, unions and opposition politicians.’
      • ‘The decision was greeted with enthusiasm and gratitude by their many stateside fans.’
      • ‘News of the production was not greeted with universal delight last week.’
      • ‘The final whistle was greeted with cheers of jubilation and sighs of relief.’
      • ‘Grant seems remarkably well adjusted, a suggestion he greets with a laugh.’
      • ‘Higgs greets all this with remarkable modesty.’
      • ‘One greets with arched eyebrows the news that Fiat intends to launch a four-wheel-drive, off-road version of the Panda later this year.’
      • ‘The theory has, however, been greeted with scepticism by several experts.’
      • ‘News of the announcement was greeted warmly by Waterford City Councillor Davy Walsh, the committee chairman.’
      • ‘But the move has been greeted with derision by sitting Euro MPs.’
    2. 1.2(especially of a sight or sound) become apparent to (a person arriving somewhere)
      ‘Sam threw open the door and was greeted by a cacophony of noise’
      • ‘In the morning a different sound greets my ears - Cherie, our cook, has come in to prepare breakfast.’
      • ‘Her image is the first sight that greets visitors in the customs hall at Sydney International Airport.’
      • ‘As Sophia and Rachele approached the camp once again, they were greeted by the sounds of a peculiar sort of argument.’
      • ‘They both made their way down to the dining room and were greeted by the sound of raucous laughter.’
      • ‘They were the first sight which greeted any visitor from the south.’
      • ‘Today, a different sight greets passers-by on the streets of Senaoane Township.’
      • ‘The crew was greeted by the sight of smoke pouring through the thatch and through the windows at the back of the pub they could see flames in one of the upstairs rooms.’
      • ‘Then we arrive back at Aberdeen Airport and we're greeted by a sign warning that people who smoke risk fines or imprisonment.’
      • ‘Nick blinked in puzzled surprise at the sight that greeted his tired eyes as they entered the camp.’
      • ‘A giant roar greets the youngster's appearance on the touchline.’
      • ‘Jack hesitantly followed her in and was greeted yet again by another awe-inspiring sight.’
      • ‘The bizarre sight greeted horticulturist Rona Ashworth after gale force winds wrecked a polytunnel at her nursery.’
      • ‘He was greeted by cries of recognition from several of the room's occupants.’
      • ‘Once there I was greeted by a sign telling me that the Eurostar Arrivals had moved.’
      • ‘A disgraceful sight has greeted visitors to one of Kerry's most popular scenic spots in recent weeks.’
      • ‘They went into the house and immediately, familiar scents and sights greeted Kate.’
      • ‘I stood on my tiptoes and leaned over his shoulder, and an almost comical sight greeted my eyes.’
      • ‘We arrived there after a little drizzle, and a pleasant earthy smell greeted our noses when we got out of the car.’
      • ‘Stepping inside, I felt my heart drop even more when I was greeted by silence.’
      • ‘Upon her arrival home she was greeted by the sound of canned laughter floating out of the den.’

Origin

Old English grētan ‘approach, attack, or salute’, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch groeten and German grüssen greet.

Pronunciation:

greet

/ɡriːt/

Main definitions of greet in English

: greet1greet2

greet2

verb

[NO OBJECT]Scottish
  • Weep; cry.

    ‘he sat down on the armchair and started to greet’
    • ‘But they can also make me greet in a manner suggesting I wish I'd been born a million miles from any misty glen.’
    • ‘Four years ago, a moment of improvised brilliance - he still claims that he meant it - was enough to send Sven's men home greeting.’
    • ‘You were a smiler but that's not to say you couldn't greet as well!’

Origin

Old English, partly from grētan ‘cry out, rage’, partly from grēotan ‘lament’, both of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation:

greet

/ɡriːt/