Main definitions of graph in English

: graph1graph2

graph1

Pronunciation: /ɡraf//ɡrɑːf/

noun

  • 1A diagram showing the relation between variable quantities, typically of two variables, each measured along one of a pair of axes at right angles.

    • ‘I've seen the pie charts and graphs so there's no arguing with their facts and findings.’
    • ‘The tool should also be able to generate a report easily through graphs and diagrams of the data and their relationships.’
    • ‘Error bars in the graphs reflect the standard deviation of 10 repeated runs.’
    • ‘The data may be visual, ie., images, charts, graphs, or diagrams or a written description.’
    • ‘No amount of surveys, graphs and pie charts will ever make me understand why this occurs.’
    • ‘It is easier to see what is happening if we plot the ratios on a graph.’
    • ‘I think it's very useful to have simple pie charts and graphs telling a colour-coded story.’
    • ‘He notes that the pair provide graphs but no statistical analysis of their data.’
    • ‘The inset graph shows the initial rate of water loss from these samples.’
    • ‘Bar charts, bar graphs, pie charts, or other charts and graphs are one of the most common methods of displaying information of various kinds.’
    • ‘And just last fortnight the country's leading economic newspaper produced a page full of pie charts and graphs devoted to tracking bumps and dips in consumer viewing.’
    • ‘In fact, all the real values are already in the graph along the x axis also called the real axis.’
    • ‘These personnel also undertook much of the preparation of the visual evidential aids such as isographs, histograms, graphs, bar charts, photographs, tables, as built programmes and overlays.’
    • ‘In general the text is slowed by frequent resort to lists of statistics that would be conveyed more effectively in a simple graph or diagram.’
    • ‘Indeed, an accompanying bar graph illustrated what many of us have suspected all along.’
    • ‘I can download data on to my PC for an intensive analysis, complete with color-coded graphs and bar charts.’
    • ‘The graph above shows the ‘survival curves’, which shows how long patients survived in each group.’
    • ‘You can chart variables on a graph and look at speed, power (a calculated estimate), temperature and altitude.’
    • ‘However, the manually plotted graphs were time consuming and susceptible to drafting errors.’
    • ‘Their eyes teeming with concentration searched the graphs and numbers on the screen intently as the information changed second by second.’
    chart, diagram, grid
    histogram, bar chart, pie chart, scatter diagram, nomogram, nomograph
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Mathematics
      A collection of points whose coordinates satisfy a given relation.
      • ‘A directed graph is a collection of nodes and edges.’
      • ‘For a time there was controversy over this issue, but it's now clear that the threshold phenomena in graphs and other mathematical structures are genuine phase transitions.’
      • ‘The second form is based on walks over complete graphs and offers numerically tractable solutions for an increasing number of taxa.’
      • ‘Otherwise, the implication is that the use of coordinate graphs simply adds to the learner's syntactic translational problem.’
      • ‘Links on the Web and citation relations between scientific articles can both be described as mathematical graphs.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Plot or trace on a graph.

    • ‘We carefully examined each of the 134 graphs and tallied errors on a checklist of common graphing errors we developed.’
    • ‘Incidentally, I graphed the statistics for US passports issued per year.’
    • ‘Some or all of the statistics should be graphed over time.’
    • ‘Statistical software with graphing capabilities is readily available and easy to use.’
    • ‘One fourth grade teacher designed the following mathematics project to incorporate measurement, statistics and graphing.’
    • ‘Specifically, we graphed a 3-day moving average of temperatures.’
    • ‘In the next graph the monthly price of Gold is graphed versus the U.S. money supply.’
    • ‘Median scores were graphed by class for all survey administration times.’
    • ‘Time series data such as changes in the elevation of Lake Michigan over the year, or changes in the number of bacteria per ml over a day, should be graphed as a line graph.’
    • ‘However, graphing the data this way also further separates the data in the wrong direction.’
    • ‘The fourth recommendation advocates the use of mathematical software or graphing calculators.’
    • ‘There are also some related activities, such as organizing the derivative values in a table and graphing the results, that the students perform by hand with paper and pencil.’
    • ‘A frequency ranking of student graphing errors indicates that graphing problems are related to a combination of factors involving the software, the student, and the instruction.’
    • ‘By graphing these responses, the team worked out the exact size of each subject's working memory.’
    • ‘I went back to my own locker and spent the next hour and a half working on a sheet of old Kinetics equations and graphing exponential functions to get me ready for class.’
    • ‘The data is then graphed in an x - y comparison plot.’
    • ‘The profile summarizes students' strengths and weaknesses and facilitates interpretation of the data, by graphing the scores from the scoring form.’
    • ‘Students can use graphing calculators or computers to solve calculus problems and to explore many different kinds of mathematical behavior.’
    • ‘I was in my usual spot in the library, graphing an inverse parabola, when a shadow fell over me.’
    • ‘Distributions of important variables were graphed and summary statistics calculated.’
    plot, trace, draw up, delineate
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 19th century: abbreviation of graphic formula.

Pronunciation:

graph

/ɡraf//ɡrɑːf/

Main definitions of graph in English

: graph1graph2

graph2

Pronunciation: /ɡraf//ɡrɑːf/

noun

Linguistics
  • A visual symbol representing a unit of sound or other feature of speech. Graphs include not only letters of the alphabet but also punctuation marks.

    • ‘For example, many children's names contain trigraphs and digraphs and graphs that represent phonemes other than those taught as "the appropriate sound".’
    • ‘In the present invention, the lexical graph has phoneme branches.’
    • ‘The initial step is the conversion of the word sequences to a phoneme transcription graph.’

Origin

1930s: from Greek graphē writing.

Pronunciation:

graph

/ɡraf//ɡrɑːf/