Definition of gooseberry in English:

gooseberry

noun

  • 1A round edible yellowish-green or reddish berry with a thin translucent hairy skin.

    • ‘Took this picture of the tiny gooseberries because they look so cute and hairy.’
    • ‘This is still a low time for fruit lovers, but the first hard little gooseberries should be here by the very end of the month.’
    • ‘In a few weeks the soft fruit which includes raspberries, redcurrants, gooseberries and blackcurrants will be available and the strawberries are already ripening and are ready to enjoy.’
    • ‘We produce plums, gooseberries - really wonderful soft fruit.’
    • ‘Others, such as cooking apples, raspberries, blackcurrants, redcurrants and gooseberries, have more pectin and set without any help.’
    • ‘And all I had in the store cupboard was a large can of ‘fruit salad’ and a smaller one of gooseberries.’
    • ‘It is also a very busy month as strawberries, blackcurrants, raspberries, gooseberries are ripening.’
    • ‘Before very recently, I had never eaten a gooseberry, or even seen one, as far as I know.’
    • ‘Apples, crab apples, gooseberries, and some plums and grapes usually contain enough natural pectin to form a gel.’
    • ‘‘Josta’ berry takes the looks of a gooseberry, removes the thorns, and makes it sweeter.’
    • ‘I guess the name was changed as gooseberries are not a popular fruit these days, more's the pity.’
    • ‘Outdoor-grown rhubarb is the only indigenous fruit till the gooseberries and very early strawberries show their faces next month.’
    • ‘Blindfolded, I don't believe I could have told, but from inspection I think it contained apple, gooseberry and blackcurrant.’
    • ‘She always comes back with a bag of gooseberries or a couple of carrots.’
    • ‘First plums through the door will end up as crumble - there is no finer fruit for it save the gooseberry - and after that there will be pie.’
    • ‘In Sweden you only work 40 hours a week and there isn't a lot to do, so we used to go picking blueberries, wild strawberries, blackberries and gooseberries in the forest near my house.’
    • ‘If you're going to freeze them (currants, gooseberries and raspberries freeze well, strawberries do not) do this directly on to a tray in a single layer.’
    • ‘The elderflower has a musky scent that really lifts the gooseberries - try adding it to gooseberry fool too.’
    • ‘Wild gooseberries and blackberries were also picked and enjoyed.’
    • ‘The business will not forget its pick-your-own roots as visitors will still be able to pick strawberries, raspberries, gooseberries, asparagus, broad beans, sweetcorn and pumpkins on the site.’
  • 2The thorny European shrub which bears gooseberries.

    • ‘Today, whether you are growing in the ground or in containers, you should choose plants that are easy to maintain and simple to grow such as rhubarb, gooseberries or strawberries.’
    • ‘Now is a good time for pruning soft fruit bushes, such as whitecurrants, redcurrants, gooseberries, blackcurrants and briar fruits.’
    • ‘Take hardwood cuttings of soft-fruit bushes such as gooseberries and currants.’
    • ‘To the rear of Old Hall is a large walled garden that has lawns and a variety of plants and shrubs, as well as strawberries, raspberries, gooseberries, rhubarb, plum and apple trees.’
    • ‘Backing on to a small woodland, the rear garden has lawns and fruit trees, with the present owners also growing raspberries blackcurrants and gooseberries.’
    • ‘Woody plants including gooseberries, raspberries and even roses may suffer from dieback after their leaves wilt and shrivel, changing to brown.’
    • ‘Since the early 1970s, George McLaren has been growing several varieties of strawberries and raspberries, redcurrants, blackcurrants, whitecurrants and gooseberries.’
    • ‘As fruit develops on gooseberries and blackcurrants, erect temporary netting to protect it from the birds.’
    • ‘Since then we have cleared ground and are now the proud owners of two red currant bushes, a gooseberry - and thanks to the generosity of a kind-hearted neighbour - a row of Mediterranean garlic.’
    • ‘They had gooseberries, blackcurrants, white currants and blackberries together with a really good stand of raspberry canes.’
    • ‘Mildew in apples and gooseberries usually affects blossom and young shoots - cut off and destroy the affected shoots and blossom.’
    • ‘As for specimen plants, how about a blackcurrant bush, a standard gooseberry or a miniature Coronet apple tree?’
    • ‘Of the soft fruits, gooseberries and redcurrants can be left as a bush or grown as a standard.’
    • ‘‘The Berry Garden,’ in another area, contains raspberries, boysenberries, huckleberries and gooseberries.’
    • ‘Prune gooseberries and redcurrants if you haven't already done so.’
    • ‘The soft fruit bed looks fantastic this year, with raspberries and strawberries both covered in flowers, the blackcurrants heavy with fruit and the gooseberries almost sawfly free.’
    • ‘Every time my gooseberry bush starts to bear fruit, it develops a fungus.’
    • ‘There were figs, walnuts, mulberries, apples, pears, damsons, gooseberries, elderberries, raspberries - and chickens, which we had inherited from the previous owners.’
    • ‘Derrick, a father-of-three with four grandchildren, grows tomatoes, cucumbers, gooseberries, aubergines and even melons in his greenhouse.’
    • ‘We'll have the gooseberries, the raspberries, and some of the bush onions in this area we'll plant down here.’
  • 3British informal A third person in the company of two people, especially lovers, who would prefer to be alone:

    ‘they didn't want me playing gooseberry on their first date’
    • ‘I stayed for the next two days, but seeing Beth and Steve together made me feel a bit of a gooseberry.’
    • ‘I was playing gooseberry at Sunday lunch in Dunbrody House, Wexford.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: the first element perhaps from goose, or perhaps based on Old French groseille, altered because of an unexplained association with the bird.

Pronunciation:

gooseberry

/ˈɡʊzb(ə)ri/