Definition of go (or appeal) to the country in English:

go (or appeal) to the country

phrase

British
  • Test public opinion by dissolving Parliament and holding a general election.

    ‘the prime minister had been due to go to the country by November’
    • ‘Our party believes we are having a positive role in Government, working step by step to implement policies that we went to the country on.’
    • ‘He should begin negotiations now with the European Central Bank, and go to the country with a clear policy, a firm commitment and a united government.’
    • ‘The delayed date still leaves him open to criticism from farmers, country dwellers and the Opposition for going to the country while the disease continues its strong grip on the nation.’
    • ‘In today's Independent on Sunday newspaper a poll of 110 Labour backbenchers showed only 45% openly in favour of going to the country on May 3.’
    • ‘What political party has ever gone to the country with such a feeble platform?’
    • ‘Supposing that I had gone to the country and said that Germany was rearming and that we must be armed, does anyone think that our pacific democracy would have rallied to that cry?’
    • ‘Not since the Labour's longest suicide note in 1983 has a political party gone to the country with such an incredible economic policy.’
    • ‘If only he had been able to go to the country when he wanted, instead of having to wait nearly 12 agonising months.’
    • ‘By a cruel irony, the decisive moment will probably have come on the afternoon of May 3 - the very day when he originally planned to go to the country.’
    • ‘Haughey went to the country after the opposition rejected government compensation proposals for haemophiliacs, which they said were too low.’