Main definitions of go in English

: go1go2

go1

verb

  • 1[no object, usually with adverbial of direction] Move from one place to another; travel:

    ‘he went out to the shops’
    ‘she longs to go back home’
    ‘we've a long way to go’
    • ‘Clara, still with no idea where she was going, went to ask the boy for directions.’
    • ‘A car going in the opposite direction stopped and its occupants got out to see what had happened and to offer their services.’
    • ‘The others went to get their coats and Douglas went outside.’
    • ‘Some kids went up the stairs, and some waited for the elevator.’
    • ‘I decided I was hungry, so I went downstairs in search of the kitchen.’
    • ‘Footsteps overhead startled her before she realized Daffyd must have gone upstairs by now.’
    • ‘She never married, but enjoyed life to the full, regularly going abroad for holidays at a time when foreign travel was a rarity.’
    • ‘I had a two-hour break between classes and went to the pub - I drank three pints and went home and crashed on the couch.’
    • ‘I got up from the table, and went upstairs to the bathroom.’
    • ‘I turned the shopping cart around, gathered up the kids, and we went home.’
    • ‘We're going round to the hospital with some CDs and stuff.’
    • ‘Pheobe clicked the kitchen TV off and went upstairs to the bathroom to get ready.’
    • ‘We said hi and then they went on their way, and I got on my bus and went home.’
    • ‘He went back to his car, switched on his phone and almost immediately it rang.’
    • ‘For the first time that year we went abroad on holiday.’
    • ‘The two guys weren't there and had apparently gone out somewhere for lunch.’
    • ‘Magistrates also barred him from going within two miles of any stadium where Colchester United or the England team are playing.’
    • ‘We told her we were thinking about going to France to visit my grandfather's grave.’
    • ‘It was an apartment by the railway track and every time a train went by the whole apartment would shake.’
    • ‘One of them waved at her and she waved back as she went past.’
    move, proceed, make one's way, advance, progress, pass, walk, wend one's way
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Travel a specified distance:
      ‘you just have to go a few miles to get to the road’
      • ‘Serves me right for going so far; I went so far I had to get the bus home.’
      • ‘He took her across street upon street, only stopping when he felt that they had gone quite a safe distance.’
      • ‘He had gone a little distance down this hall when he saw a door with an unfamiliar symbol on it.’
      • ‘I have not heard of anyone in the USA going more than 100 miles earlier this year.’
      • ‘It would take over an hour to reach the fishing grounds but we had gone barely a mile before we saw one of the most magnificent sights in the world.’
      • ‘But they had only gone a few miles down the road when someone realised that the door to the luggage compartment on their bus had opened.’
      • ‘None the less, I had gone barely half a mile in my Scenic when a bus driver, alongside me at a junction, put his window down to express his admiration.’
      • ‘ROGERR went about 20 yards, veered violently off, smashed into a kerb and put himself out of action.’
      • ‘I left the traps here this morning and went 8 miles on horseback to see what the country was like.’
      • ‘I know that I'm committed to going 500 miles, but I just don't know when it will happen.’
      • ‘Dozens of families boarded a vintage steam train and went the short distance up the track to see Santa in his grotto.’
      • ‘Heavy freight that goes long distances, from Auckland to Wellington, should travel by road.’
      • ‘At first she was just going to walk one kilometre but Mr Smith said she was going the whole 5km distance.’
      • ‘We had gone a good distance on a dimly lit road when a strong, foul and suffocating odour swarmed into and around our car.’
      • ‘Are you interested in running a half-marathon, or even going the full distance, for charity?’
      • ‘The other kind of holiday I like is going 10 miles from where you live, so that you have hardly any travelling time.’
      • ‘So if you're going long distances this is a much better way of getting there.’
      • ‘They followed the road for a couple of hours, then, after they had gone about a dozen miles, they veered off of it and into the woods for another four or five miles.’
    2. 1.2 Travel or move in order to engage in a specified activity:
      ‘let's go and have a pint’
      [with infinitive] ‘we went to see her’
      [with present participle] ‘she used to go hunting’
      • ‘After taking Hallie home, Jordan decided to go for a drive.’
      • ‘At about six o'clock on most evenings I went for a run.’
      • ‘There are people going on protests now who were not even born when Chernobyl happened.’
      • ‘Pam and I used to go and have a drink and watch the games.’
      • ‘I had gone to visit my parents for the weekend, and my mother drove me to the Greyhound station for my return trip.’
      • ‘‘We were looking forward to getting our lives back, to going on holidays and spending more quality time together,’ says Jennie.’
      • ‘After dumping our bags at the hotel, we decided to go for a meal and ended up at a pretty little restaurant.’
      • ‘Finally, I went for a long walk and sat down exhausted in a park.’
      • ‘For the last five years we have been going skydiving each weekend.’
      • ‘I used to go skiing in Switzerland with a friend.’
      • ‘They talked for a while longer and then went and had some dinner.’
      • ‘The couple stayed overnight in the hotel's bridal suite before going on their honeymoon.’
      • ‘‘Let's go shopping tomorrow,’ she said, in between bites of her lunch.’
      • ‘I was actually thinking of going to visit him this week.’
      • ‘Against her better judgment, Rachel decided to go for a walk.’
      • ‘I also have friends who hate going on trips with me, because they say I always make them feel guilty when they turn up with three suitcases to my one.’
      • ‘I went to see him last Friday and he didn't look well.’
      • ‘But we're looking forward to going on trips to Europe during the school holidays.’
      • ‘In 1790 he went on a walking tour of France, the Alps, and Italy.’
      • ‘Despite this disappointment, Mr Jones, who has been going on cruises since 1970, said P & O treated him well.’
    3. 1.3go to Attend or visit for a particular purpose:
      ‘we went to the cinema’
      ‘he went to Cambridge University’
      • ‘I go to the brasserie underneath all the time, and that's fun, because you can sit on the pavement for lunch and see who's going past.’
      • ‘My brother had already gone back to college.’
      • ‘He went to the Catherine Rural College for 12 months.’
      • ‘There are those who go to the sales wanting to buy something and there are others, like myself, who are forced into going.’
      • ‘We went back to the North African restaurant where I had gone with the cast the night before.’
      • ‘Soon you will be going off to college and I won't see you for four years.’
      • ‘She asked me if I wanted to go to McDonald's for dinner.’
      • ‘Passing exams and going to university will provide our youngsters with tremendous opportunities.’
      • ‘I took some time off to go down to Cambridge for a friend's wedding, and a good time was had by all.’
      • ‘My oldest son, Alan, went to a public day school, and my daughter, Margaret, went away to board.’
      • ‘From next month she is going to the institute to study for a master's degree.’
      • ‘More often than not, she attends opening ceremonies, goes to parties, meets people and takes part in charity work for the local community.’
      • ‘My ex-husband knew I wanted to go to law school but always told me he'd divorce me if I went.’
      • ‘John used to go to the greyhound track every night before Denis was attacked, but he hasn't gone since.’
      • ‘He will be going off to university soon, and as such, he is doing tons of research on the university he is supposed to be attending.’
      • ‘This isn't surprising, though, since attending church is like going to the theatre.’
      • ‘She regularly goes to the movies and attends film festivals.’
      • ‘In Russia it is part of everyday life that one goes regularly to the theatre.’
      • ‘Rock photographer Jill Furmanovsky has been going regularly to the festival for more than 10 years.’
      • ‘He goes regularly to the Crunch Gym, a trendy health club for Hollywood's young and beautiful.’
    4. 1.4 (of a thing) lie or extend in a certain direction:
      ‘the scar went all the way up her leg’
      • ‘There are beautiful deserted beaches that go for miles upon unending miles.’
      • ‘She had long strawberry blonde hair that went past her shoulders and sparkling blue eyes.’
      • ‘We opened the bridge that goes across the river so people can go back and forth.’
      • ‘I also noticed another scar that goes around the side of his belly.’
      • ‘The beach is huge and goes on and on for miles.’
      • ‘He had a black cloak on his shoulders that went down to his ankles.’
      • ‘At last the path goes over a rise and you get your first, quite wonderful view of Sandwood Bay.’
      • ‘There was a small track going off to the left, directly opposite the College sign directing me further down Spetchley Road.’
      • ‘The mirror went all the way up to the ceiling and was just as wide as it was tall.’
      • ‘The 58 zigzags across the arid Southern California desert, between mountains, with every few miles a turn. The 5 goes in one straight line for mile after mile.’
      • ‘Over his shirt he wore a long blue vest that went past his knees, covered in golden embroidery.’
      • ‘Her black hair went down to her shoulders and looked as though she had her own person stylist come in and do it every morning.’
      • ‘It's a device that goes around the hose and attaches securely to the connection end.’
      • ‘His body was found near the causeway going towards Railway Station.’
      • ‘We embraced, and his lips found mine, a little jolt went down my spine sending a little shiver down it.’
      • ‘At the moment it only goes three-quarters of the way around the city.’
      • ‘Selina swallowed hard as a slight shiver went down her spine.’
      • ‘She wore a black dress and black boots that went past her knees.’
      • ‘Sometimes, a strap is attached to the splint and goes around the neck to help hold the arm.’
      • ‘Are you saying that your understanding was that the driveway went down to the gatepost?’
      extend, continue, carry on, stretch, reach
      View synonyms
    5. 1.5 Change in level, amount, or rank:
      ‘prices went up by 15 per cent’
      • ‘The wholesale cost of electricity has gone up by 23 per cent since November.’
      • ‘Remember, of course, that equity values can go down as well as up.’
      • ‘It was also one of the very few countries whose defence budget began to go up, rather than down, in the 1990s.’
      • ‘The reason the price went down is because the Saudis are now talking about increasing production.’
      • ‘The bank's share price also went up by 3.6 per cent to 1223 pence.’
      • ‘It went down to minus 20 degrees celsius last night.’
      • ‘With today's base rates at historic lows, the chances of rates going down much further are pretty slim.’
      • ‘Prices have gone up because of an increase in demand for oil, particularly from China.’
      • ‘Funding for prisons has continued to increase in the past two decades, while the percentage of the state budget spent on higher education is going down, the study said.’
      • ‘Those subsidies cause the global market to be flooded with farm products, driving down prices and making it harder for Third World farmers to make a living.’
      • ‘If the Footsie fell by the same amount it would have gone below 3,000.’
      • ‘In 1922, voter turnout in Australia went down to fifty-eight percent.’
      • ‘The chances of infection go down by about 90 per cent when the animal is dead.’
      • ‘In case you did not notice, postage rates went up for a second time this year on June 30.’
      • ‘They now face the prospect of having to clear up their home for a second time when the floods eventually go down.’
      • ‘Investors should be aware of the risks involved and remember that the value of securities held may go down as well as up.’
      • ‘Schools' costs have gone up because of the increase in national insurance and higher contributions to teachers' pension schemes.’
      • ‘We checked his temperature again which had now gone down to 38 celsius.’
      • ‘I only bring the subject up because of the news on the front page of last week's Daily Record that the price of a pint is to go up by 10p.’
      • ‘In addition, the life expectancy for women in 16 of the 27 countries studied has gone down.’
    6. 1.6[in imperative] Begin motion (used in a starter's order to begin a race):
      ‘ready, steady, go!’
      • ‘All right: ready, steady, go!’
      • ‘When I say go, run as fast as you can to that rock on your right and hide behind it.’
      • ‘‘On your marks, get set, go!’ Coach Henderson blew the whistle.’
    7. 1.7informal Said in various expressions when angrily or contemptuously dismissing someone:
      ‘go and get stuffed’
      • ‘My husband and I still disagree, but I just tell him to go and get stuffed.’
      • ‘‘Go to hell,’ Isabelle muttered, but even she wasn't brave enough to say that loud enough for him to hear.’
      • ‘I told her to go to hell, and she screamed several things back at me, but I really didn't care.’
      come to an end, cease to exist, disappear, vanish, be no more, be over, run its course, fade away, melt away, evaporate
      View synonyms
  • 2[no object] Leave; depart:

    ‘I really must go’
    • ‘Unfortunately, when we turned round to go back to our horse and carriage, we discovered he had already gone.’
    • ‘She had only been gone about fifteen minutes when the first raindrops began.’
    • ‘They asked him a few questions, he went out of the room prepare some tea and when he returned, they were gone.’
    • ‘As soon as they had gone, the woman went out into the street and frantically flagged down a motorist before alerting police to the robbery.’
    • ‘They would send out a squad car to check things out and by then the kid would be gone.’
    • ‘I think it would have been much better for him and the Trust if he had gone at the same time as the chairman.’
    • ‘Dr. Farley left, saying that he must be going and quickly shut the door behind him.’
    • ‘You're not going yet, are you? I was just about to tell you my plan.’
    • ‘The next day Phil phoned me asking what had happened as he'd blanked out in the pub and when he came round everyone had gone.’
    • ‘There's a lone car in the courtyard - everyone else must have already gone.’
    • ‘The lady went to her own room to make a cup of tea and when she returned found Smith had gone, along with £12 from her handbag.’
    • ‘And then the other housemates must choose who goes.’
    • ‘I went out for a enjoyable evening and returned to find that Holmes had gone.’
    • ‘She carried on walking and went up the stairs to her bedroom, they obviously hadn't even noticed she'd gone.’
    • ‘‘Oh do you have to go so soon?’ said Diane, looking at her watch.’
    • ‘I really must be going, but before I do there are some things you need to know.’
    • ‘After some time, he came over to me and said that we must be going now - we had to meet someone.’
    • ‘I have no time for this! I've got to go!’
    • ‘The last bus goes at 7pm, which leaves youngsters stranded in the village and older residents with little chance to enjoy the city nightlife.’
    • ‘I don't think he stuck around to smoke it cause I went out about 10 minutes later and he was gone.’
    leave, go, depart, get going, get out, be off with you, shoo
    scram, be on your way, run along, beat it, skedaddle, split, vamoose, scat, get lost, push off, buzz off, shove off, clear off, go jump in the lake, go and jump in the lake
    hop it, bog off, naff off, on your bike, get along, sling your hook
    bug off, light out, haul off, haul ass, take a powder, hit the trail, take a hike
    nick off
    rack off
    voetsak, hamba
    bugger off, piss off, fuck off
    sod off
    begone, avaunt
    leave, depart, take one's leave, take oneself off, go away, go off, withdraw, absent oneself, say one's goodbyes, quit, make an exit, exit
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 (of time) pass or elapse:
      ‘the hours went by’
      ‘three years went past’
      • ‘With just over four minutes gone it was again level at 24 apiece.’
      • ‘Several months went by and she had done her best to forget that unsettling question.’
      • ‘The court ordered they pay us by a certain date, and whaddya know, the day came and went without payment.’
      • ‘Will was alarming me more and more with every second that went past.’
      • ‘Gradually, as the years went by, Abercrombie and Gibson slipped into virtual oblivion.’
      • ‘Another three years went by before her name appeared on the score sheet.’
      • ‘The daily press conferences became increasingly sombre as the days went past.’
      • ‘As the days went by, the sense of national outrage and shock grew and grew.’
      • ‘But another six weeks went by and there was still no sign of your direct debit being increased.’
      • ‘Ten days went by and it looked as if this would become another Australian mystery.’
      • ‘Physically I had a sort of knot in my stomach, and as each hour went by that she was missing, it got worse and worse.’
      • ‘The days that followed went by so slowly that it seemed mid-Summer instead of May.’
      • ‘Anyway, this week went by fairly smoothly.’
      • ‘The weeks leading up the Christmas break went slowly, filled to the brim with last minute assignments and tests.’
      • ‘Another eight months went by, and response times did improve - by a mere five per cent.’
      • ‘The sun didn't last all that long, and it got quite cold as time went by.’
      • ‘The morning went by pretty busily until about lunchtime when I got a call from the people publishing my book.’
      • ‘But as the weeks went by, and no phone call came, Amy's mum Tracy admits she had lost hope.’
      • ‘As the months went by the two men would meet briefly at secret locations.’
      • ‘The promised decision date of August 31 came and went without any announcement.’
      pass, pass by, elapse, slip by, slip past, roll by, roll past, tick away
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 Pass a specified amount of time in a particular way:
      ‘they went for two weeks without talking’
      • ‘I sometimes went for weeks without a drink, and didn't miss it at all.’
      • ‘I went for two weeks without TV voluntarily last summer.’
      • ‘The most I've gone without sleep is somewhere around the 55-60 hour mark.’
      • ‘Last year, statisticians counted how long United went without a win.’
      • ‘This was coming from the guy who had once gone an entire weekend without sleep before his first external examination.’
      • ‘Ireland went 18 years without winning in Scotland but they have not lost here now since 2001.’
      • ‘Every game we went without losing seemed to make us stronger.’
      • ‘If Liverpool fail to win against Fulham it will be the first time since October 2000 that they have gone four matches without a win.’
      • ‘You know, anybody who's gone without sleep, even for just one night, knows that it can really sort of, you know, mess with your head.’
      • ‘That's the longest I've gone without one for many years.’
      • ‘Teenagers went without food for a whole day to raise money for orphans in Africa.’
      • ‘The longer Celtic went without scoring, the more it seemed likely that the visitors would snatch a goal.’
    3. 2.3 Come to an end; cease to exist:
      ‘a golden age that has now gone for good’
      ‘11,500 jobs are due to go by next year’
      • ‘The summer weather that the weekend gave us has gone, and been replaced by thick grey clouds, heavy with rain.’
      • ‘When she woke 40 minutes later the pain had gone.’
      • ‘The days of a manager commanding respect from his players simply because of who he is are long gone if they ever existed at all.’
      • ‘If the ferry goes, I think I would just close down.’
      • ‘Once the stone is gone it's very difficult to replace and we have to hope the thieves are found and brought to justice.’
      • ‘Campaigns to introduce daylight saving have come and gone regularly over the years and there is another on the go.’
      • ‘Many older people remember the days when people left their front door open - sadly those days are gone and we all need to be more careful.’
      • ‘Thousands of jobs went at aerospace company Rolls Royce as airlines cancelled orders for new planes.’
      • ‘The previous weariness was now completely gone from her features and instead was replaced by obvious excitement.’
      • ‘In a statement yesterday they announced that 14,000 jobs are due to due to go next year.’
      • ‘It must have existed at some point, but now it's vanished, gone, disappeared, forever.’
      • ‘The glory days for this product are long, long gone, and no amount of wishing will bring them back.’
      • ‘Her bruise wasn't completely gone, but with the help of make-up, she was able to conceal it.’
      • ‘The a la carte menu's gone and she now serves traditional, home-cooked grub.’
      • ‘Goalkeeper Neil Alexander, however, managed to parry his forceful drive wide and the chance of stealing a point was gone.’
      • ‘The bruising is almost completely gone and she's putting more weight on it every day.’
      • ‘Those golden days, if they ever existed, are long gone in most professional sports.’
      • ‘Instead of getting rid of the effect of lack of sleep I ended up with an eye infection, which still hasn't gone completely.’
      • ‘We have been told the trees will camouflage the mast but when the leaves have gone it will be clearly visible.’
      • ‘The challenge of studying extinctions is that it can be hard to know when a species is finally gone for good.’
      come to an end, cease to exist, disappear, vanish, be no more, be over, run its course, fade away, melt away, evaporate
      View synonyms
    4. 2.4 Cease operating or functioning:
      ‘the power went in our road last week’
      • ‘The electricity is gone, and food and water are running out.’
      • ‘The house did not suffer any structural damage but when the lightning hit the house there was an enormous bang, the fuses blew and the power went.’
      • ‘I was riding my scooter down a steep hill, with a pillion passenger on the back, when the brake cable went.’
      be used up, be spent, be finished, be at an end, be exhausted, be consumed, be drained, be depleted
      View synonyms
    5. 2.5 Die (used euphemistically):
      ‘I'd like to see my grandchildren before I go’
      • ‘Long after I'm gone, some kid can walk into a place and see an image of me and read what I did in the NFL.’
      • ‘I think possibly his death might have been a little easier to handle because I was young and I didn't quite understand but when my grandfather went it hit me like a ton of bricks just because I was that bit older and I know he wasn't coming back.’
      • ‘But when I'm gone it will be taken from my estate.’
      • ‘After a healthy life, this vigorous, energetic, dynamic man was gone at age 59.’
      • ‘We have kept hoping for as long as we could, but we have to accept Margaret has probably gone and at last her suffering has ended.’
      • ‘Jack Daniels lovers will be happy to know that their favourite drink goes for R10 a shot and an extra R5,50 with a dash of soda water.’
      • ‘He lived life to the full and even though he has gone at a young age he fitted a lifetime of achievements into his life. No matter what, he always had a smile on his face.’
      die, pass away, pass on, expire, depart this life, be no more, breathe one's last, draw one's last breath, meet one's end, meet one's death, meet one's maker, give up the ghost, go to the great beyond, cross the great divide, shuffle off this mortal coil, perish, go the way of all flesh, go the way of the flesh, go to one's last resting place
      View synonyms
    6. 2.6 Be lost or stolen:
      ‘when he returned minutes later his equipment had gone’
      • ‘I think I was just worried that we'd come back and all the equipment would have gone.’
      • ‘I went up to my locker, only to discover that the lock was missing and half my books were gone.’
      • ‘When Wood returned to the truck parked on Panorama Drive, her bike was gone along with two others belonging to friends visiting from Washing-ton state.’
      be stolen, be taken
      View synonyms
    7. 2.7go to Be sold or awarded to:
      ‘the top prize went to a twenty-four-year-old sculptor’
      • ‘On your spouse's death, this half goes to your children.’
      • ‘The best newcomer award went to the double act Noble and Silver.’
      • ‘Last year the award went to N.H. Dini, one of Indonesia's most famous female writers.’
      • ‘Vet of the Year award went to Paul Harris, of Thirsk, who was nominated by Dalmatian breeder Chris Pickup.’
      • ‘One of the awards went to an army corporal who saved a colleague's life.’
      • ‘The first award went to Manchester's Christie Hospital for its pioneering work in cancer treatment and research.’
      • ‘The best international group award went to the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Pink took home best international female title.’
      • ‘Of course the real credit goes to the books themselves.’
      • ‘The $10,000 prize goes to emerging artists in the field of creative photography.’
      • ‘The Young Player of the Year Award went to local-born defender Nicky Hunt.’
      • ‘My thanks go to Richard Holt for providing invaluable information for my work.’
      • ‘This annual fun event is attracting bigger crowds each year and, of course, all proceeds go to a very worthy cause.’
      • ‘The money will, of course, go to the Yorkshire Dales and Harrogate Appeal at Airedale General Hospital.’
      • ‘The gold medal went to defending champions Romania, who pulled away after only 500m and soared to victory in a time of 7:06.56.’
      • ‘Indeed the main award of the night went to the young and talented Alan Betson of The Irish Times.’
      • ‘The remaining property went to the oldest son.’
      • ‘The award for best costume went to Hubert Keaney who was a werewolf for the night.’
      • ‘The Country Pub Of The Season award went to the fabulous New Inn in Cropton, making it a hat-trick for them too.’
      • ‘The man of the match award went to Tony Ruddy on left midfield who won every tackle and never gave the ball away.’
      • ‘That award went to Ruud van Nistelrooy, who scored both of United's other goals.’
      • ‘The physics prize went to three Americans who've explained something of what goes on within the nucleus of atoms.’
      be given, be donated, be assigned, be allotted, be granted, be presented, be awarded
      View synonyms
    8. 2.8 (of money) be spent, especially in a specified way:
      ‘the rest of his money went on medical expenses’
      • ‘Wouldn't it be better to work out where your money is going and cut your expenses to fit your income?’
      • ‘The way he lives, you can understand where £100m goes, but I have no idea where the other £400m goes.’
      • ‘Cleopatra, directed by J Gordon Edwards, cost $500,000 to make, with $50,000 going on soft furnishings alone.’
      • ‘Fixed payments allow you to plan where your money goes, preventing unpleasant surprises from interest rate rise - and probably help you to sleep better at night.’
      • ‘All we have had is £60 to live on this month and that is supposed to be going on my daughter.’
      • ‘Most of the money goes in salaries and allowances for teachers, or educators as they are now officially known.’
      • ‘It's easy to spend money and it went quickly on drinking and festivals.’
      • ‘Far too many British buyers make no effort to find out how much of their cash is going on commissions.’
      • ‘Seven other areas of the UK will share more than £7m to tackle congestion, with much of the money going on schemes looking at road charging.’
      • ‘When I go to the cash machine I generally get out about £100, but it goes quickly when you have seven children.’
      • ‘The Department for Transport said £73m was being spent on the railways a week, while a huge amount was going on new trains and upgrading stations on the region's TransPennine Express network.’
      • ‘Perhaps that is the reason why no one knows where the billion dollars in aid money went.’
      • ‘A third of the investment will go on the country's rail system, with another third going on improvements to the road network.’
      • ‘The money had gone in excessive compensation and unapproved bonuses, fees and loans.’
      • ‘A budget checks frivolous spending, helps you see where your money goes and frees up cash for retirement savings.’
      • ‘Most people say they don't mind paying a reasonable rate of tax provided they can see where their money is going.’
      • ‘But what if you don't have a say about where your tax money goes?’
      be used up, be spent, be finished, be at an end, be exhausted, be consumed, be drained, be depleted
      View synonyms
  • 3be going to be/do somethingIntend or be likely or intended to be or do something (used to express a future tense):

    ‘I'm going to be late for work’
    ‘she's going to have a baby’
    • ‘I thought we were going to be trapped at the top of the tower block and that my children and me were going to die.’
    • ‘On Friday we had friends down from London and so we knew we were going to abandon the diet.’
    • ‘We knew there were going to be a lot of people, but they're still streaming in now.’
    • ‘I had no real idea just how much money it was going to cost and how much we were going to make.’
    • ‘She's requested a detailed medical report and then she's going to show that to her lawyers.’
    • ‘They've come out of a tough division and all the players knew they were going to get a hard game today.’
    • ‘We were told at a meeting two weeks ago that we were going to be made redundant.’
    • ‘We both stood there looking at it in horror, wondering how we were going to explain this.’
    • ‘She's going to have a baby.’
    • ‘Two other friends from school are going to visit him at the start of March for 10 days.’
    • ‘I took a seat at the front, and picked up my piece of paper that listed all the wines we were going to taste.’
    • ‘He evidently knew by now that I wasn't going to show up and he still hadn't phoned.’
    • ‘They were going to keep him in overnight and we could collect him on Wednesday afternoon.’
    • ‘He told me that he saw no future at all for the club and that he was going to close us down in two weeks' time.’
    • ‘Older and wiser, and with slightly more money in my purse, we were going to do Paris in style.’
    • ‘I had never seen her really cry before but she thought they were going to kill her.’
    • ‘They told us we were going to lose him and we tried to prepare ourselves for that.’
    • ‘She was going to be late, and she knew her client didn't like to be kept waiting.’
    • ‘They were very confident that they were going to succeed.’
    • ‘I think I'm going to sell my car.’
  • 4[no object, with complement] Pass into or be in a specified state, especially an undesirable one:

    ‘the food is going bad’
    ‘no one went hungry in our house’
    ‘he's gone crazy’
    • ‘Food was plentiful and only the poorest starved or went hungry.’
    • ‘Police have appealed for information about two teenage girls who went missing last weekend.’
    • ‘Have they gone completely mad, have they lost all sense of perspective?’
    • ‘She fell down and went completely limp with pain and exhaustion.’
    • ‘Unfortunately I have heard from many people that letters containing money go missing.’
    • ‘I hate umbrellas, won't normally use them, but I must have gone soft over the last few months.’
    • ‘One horrified witness later told police the defendant looked as if he had gone crazy.’
    • ‘I was sure that she must have gone deaf because she didn't answer until I was merely a few feet away from her.’
    • ‘Seek medical attention if your child seems very unwell or goes blue in the face.’
    • ‘I thought I'd better go on holiday and take a break before I finally went completely bananas.’
    • ‘She said without the support of her friends and family she would have gone completely off the rails.’
    • ‘I couldn't cope with anything and felt I was going completely mad at times.’
    • ‘Cataracts that cloud the whole lens can seriously affect your sight and you may need an operation to prevent you going blind.’
    • ‘I was in the supermarket and I got this cellphone call and I just went completely to pieces.’
    • ‘If someone loses a wallet or a cat goes missing we can get the information out straight away,’
    • ‘‘They were all shouting at me and saying that marriage should be for life,’ Ron goes quiet for a moment.’
    • ‘Finally, I was forced to take a sleeping tablet in an attempt to stop myself from going completely insane.’
    • ‘I put an arm around him and try to think of something comforting to say but my mind's gone blank.’
    • ‘YORKSHIRE went bargain-crazy at the weekend, as hundreds of thousands of shoppers flocked to the sales.’
    • ‘The parade organisers would have gone bankrupt on account of the crippling public liability insurance.’
    become, get, turn, grow, come to be
    View synonyms
    1. 4.1go to/into Enter into a specified state or course of action:
      ‘she went back to sleep’
      ‘the car went into a spin’
      • ‘We watched the movies David's mum had rented for us before we finally decided to go to sleep.’
      • ‘By the time the movie was over it was well past midnight, so they both decided to go to sleep.’
      • ‘Of course, nobody goes into business intending to flop.’
      • ‘Matthew is considering going into the car registration business when he leaves school and dad Dave has no doubts that he has what it takes to succeed.’
      • ‘His father was an Oxford man who was called to the bar, but instead of becoming a barrister went into business.’
      • ‘The 68-year-old complained of breathing difficulties on arrival in Australia and was taken to hospital, where he went into a coma.’
      • ‘She left corporate America in 1992 to take a real-estate appraising course and soon went into business for herself.’
      • ‘Eddie knew that in a couple of years time he could pack it all in, and maybe go into partnership with Brian.’
      • ‘Only problem was, he wore himself out so effectively that he fell asleep in the car all the way home and now won't go to sleep in his own bed.’
      • ‘The speeding Corvette swerved to avoid intersection traffic and went into a spin.’
      • ‘Last year just 350 newly graduated mathematicians went into teaching.’
      • ‘Professor Smith had a glittering academic career in maths before going into university management.’
      • ‘I curled up and went to sleep, and I slept soundly for the first time since I've been here.’
    2. 4.2 Make a sound of a specified kind:
      ‘the engine went bang’
      • ‘They used a flash grenade, it went bang and the whole place lit up.’
      • ‘This is due to an unfortunate event affecting our home computer - basically, it went bang.’
      • ‘The elevator went ping and the doors opened.’
    3. 4.3 (of a bell or similar device) make a sound in functioning:
      ‘I heard the buzzer go four times’
      • ‘I manage half a day of final tweaking then the phone goes.’
      • ‘Finally the bell went for lunch and the two friends rushed into the hall with their lunch boxes and gulped their lunches down so they could get outside as soon as possible.’
      • ‘Keenan tried one last run but was hauled down, Morrison and company held Couper up, and when the whistle went it was pandemonium as the Hawks celebrated.’
      • ‘Scotland's fate was made official with the events in Oslo but, really, they were done as soon as the final whistle went at Hampden hours earlier.’
      • ‘‘I still expect to see her standing there every time the door goes,’ she said.’
  • 5[no object] Proceed or turn out in a specified way:

    ‘how did the weekend go?’
    ‘at first all went well’
    • ‘Carlo's dinner a deux goes horribly wrong.’
    • ‘Anyway, I have to go back tomorrow so we'll see how that goes!’
    • ‘He clearly wasn't best thrilled with his job last week and it went from bad to worse for him today.’
    • ‘It depends how Monday's disciplinary hearing goes.’
    • ‘We have been going out for two and a half years and, if all goes well, we plan to go to Cyprus in two years' time to get married.’
    • ‘Things are going smoothly at the moment.’
    • ‘But everything went off without a hitch and it was quite a festive occasion.’
    • ‘We went out for a quick drive a couple of days after my last lesson and that went all right.’
    • ‘All was going well until we went to the Crescent Hotel where I was refused entry for wearing a sports shirt, even after pointing out what day it was.’
    • ‘After months of careful planning and training the programme of events went without a hitch.’
    • ‘His meeting must have gone well because he looked a whole lot happier now then when he left.’
    • ‘This is a big year for the Queen and like all professionals, she wants it to go well.’
    • ‘‘Because of the way farming is going it is more important than ever to have something to fall back on if things go wrong,’ he said.’
    • ‘Then I went off to do my gig in Bristol, which went pretty well.’
    • ‘I've been here since half eight this morning and, the way things are going it looks like I could be here another half hour.’
    • ‘But not much goes right for the Greenock club these days.’
    • ‘We were disappointed the way things went at the end of last season, but this makes up for it.’
    • ‘The excellent weather meant the event went without a hitch and the streets were lined with supporters waving on the colourful procession of floats.’
    • ‘However, It's a commonly known fact that as soon as one area of your life improves, another goes terribly wrong.’
    • ‘All proceeds will go to the Trust, with ticket sales said to be going extremely well.’
    turn out, work out, fare, progress, develop, come out
    View synonyms
    1. 5.1 Be acceptable or permitted:
      ‘underground events where anything goes’
      • ‘Bush seems to favor a competitive environment, and once he's satisfied that's the case, almost anything goes.’
      • ‘From there anything goes and it's perfectly possible - although in no way necessary - to spend as much on a barbecue as it is a second hand car.’
      • ‘This does not mean, however, that interpreting the Constitution is a free-form activity in which anything goes.’
      • ‘And viewers accepted every single frame because none of it was real - anything goes in The Matrix.’
      • ‘Casual dress does not mean anything goes, and an RNFA should not make the mistake of assuming there are no rules.’
      • ‘In terms of what to wear when running - it's a case of anything goes (well almost!).’
      • ‘It's the abolition of all standards that has caused the permissive society that we live in, where anything goes and laws can be broken.’
      • ‘In a city where anything goes and everything is possible, six strangers are about to be given the chance of a lifetime!’
      • ‘Just about anything goes, probably because anything went in the family home on Belfast's Ormeau Road.’
  • 6[no object] Be harmonious, complementary, or matching:

    ‘rosemary goes with roast lamb’
    ‘the earrings and the scarf don't really go’
    • ‘This is very summery, and goes perfectly with a tall glass of lemonade.’
    • ‘The girls could not resist spending money. They each got skirts in different colours to go with their bathing suits.’
    • ‘There was a bracelet that went with it too but adding it would have made the outfit too overdone.’
    • ‘Winter favorites are white and all shades of blue. And, of course, black is still a classic which goes with any outfit.’
    • ‘This would go well with a light chicken salad or maybe some simple pork chops.’
    • ‘This is just the sort of comfort food that goes well with low self-esteem, a weepy video like Beaches and being single.’
    • ‘The red also goes perfectly with her white cotton jacket and loose pants.’
    • ‘It is also shifting plenty of feminine, lacy lingerie, in the kind of bright colours that go well with a sun tan.’
    • ‘Acidic foods and acidic wines often go well together; like a salad and Beaujolais.’
    • ‘Though she is not crazy about diamonds, she feels they go well with platinum.’
    • ‘The stir fry didn't go well with the powerful redcurrant and juniper sauce.’
    • ‘Salmon and pasta really go well together - once again, it's a texture thing.’
    • ‘Its aroma is very full-bodied and complex, and it went deliciously well in this soup.’
    • ‘‘Mum,’ I tell her, ‘your top doesn't go with your skirt.’’
    • ‘I know that cabbage traditionally goes with pork, but I've never been able to stomach the stuff.’
    • ‘The sauce would go well with pork tenderloin too, but so far I've tried it with sirloin.’
    • ‘Pink grapefruit, being acidic, goes perfectly with crab which tends to be quite rich.’
    • ‘I also returned the bathmats that I had bought, since purple doesn't really go with my peach/brown/red bathroom colour scheme.’
    match, go together, be harmonious, harmonize, blend, suit each other, be suited, complement each other, be complementary, coordinate with each other, be compatible
    View synonyms
    1. 6.1 Be found in the same place or situation; be associated:
      ‘cooking and eating go together’
      • ‘She will gain a child, a pram, responsibility for another human being and all that goes with motherhood.’
      • ‘Drum, who holds a journalism degree from California State University, admits to ‘some doubt about whether blogging and professional journalism can go together’.’
      • ‘They want the family, to spend lots of time with their babies, but they also want the money and excitement that goes with a career.’
      • ‘For adults the back to school date signals an end to summer and all that goes with it - normality has returned.’
      • ‘Who says that art and commerce don't go together?’
  • 7[no object] (of a machine or device) function:

    ‘my car won't go’
    • ‘Ok Bobby, keep the engine going and I'll be back in a few minutes.’
    • ‘I needed two things: to put the tent up and to get the cooker going to provide heat for my hand and body.’
    • ‘But for the past week I have struggled to get this clock to go.’
    • ‘If you plan to keep the car until it won't go anymore, it doesn't matter if you get a 2003 or a 2004. Just buy something you like enough to drive for 10 years or more.’
    • ‘It was muggy in the car so I took my keys and turned on the engine so that I could get the air conditioning going.’
    • ‘There was another guy in my cell and none of us realised the tape machine was still going.’
    function, work, be in working order, run, operate, be operative, perform
    View synonyms
    1. 7.1 Continue in operation or existence:
      ‘the committee was kept going even when its existence could no longer be justified’
      • ‘The organisation promotes physical activity and health through country walking, and the money will keep it going for the next year.’
      • ‘But something other than money, even vast piles of it, keeps Bond going.’
      • ‘Today, the co-op is still going, but it's now down to two members.’
      • ‘The project has been going for more than 20 years and the series of exhibitions have brought the results to a wider audience.’
      • ‘All cooking was done over an open fire, which also their source of heat and which was kept going all the year round.’
  • 8go into/to/towards[no object] Contribute to or be put into (a whole):

    ‘considerable effort went into making the operation successful’
    • ‘The income goes towards maintaining the buildings and the estate.’
    • ‘An exceptional amount of time and effort went into this year's parade.’
    • ‘The proceeds go towards the upkeep of the Homework Club.’
    • ‘This money went towards various projects in the village and also in the community centre.’
    • ‘It had raised a lot of cash that went towards improving the Christmas lights display.’
    • ‘With this debt write off, significant resources which could otherwise have gone towards servicing the obligations to Japan can now be freed and channelled towards other needy areas.’
    • ‘The money went towards paying for her husband's care and legal bills.’
    • ‘All proceeds from the venture are going towards the new Community Centre in Loughglynn.’
    • ‘They knew I was only working in a factory and all my money went towards a flight ticket to the Philippines.’
    • ‘The ingredients that go into ice cream are simple and easy to obtain.’
    • ‘Proceeds of that activity went towards the Kiwanis' schoolbooks project.’
    • ‘Medical spending costs are increasing while the total effort going into government-funded medical research is decreasing.’
    • ‘T & G north west spokesman Dave McCall said: ‘The money could have gone towards paying people better wages and giving them better terms and conditions.’’
    • ‘It is no accident that they are quality staff, because huge investment has gone into training.’
    • ‘The proceeds go towards the completion of phase two of the indoor equestrian centre.’
    • ‘One million dollars went towards the construction and funding of equipment for the labs.’
    • ‘Much of Murray's efforts have gone towards trying to raise money from the private sector.’
    • ‘Royalties for A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius have gone towards the establishment of 826, Valencia, an academy in San Francisco that encourages and teaches creative writing for those between the ages of eight and 18.’
    • ‘The money went towards school fees, uniform, books and travel.’
    • ‘The effort that has gone into the research and compilation of this publication is remarkable.’
    1. 8.1 Used to indicate how many people a supply of a resource is sufficient for or how much can be achieved using it:
      ‘the sale will go a long way towards easing the huge debt burden’
      ‘a little luck can go a long way’
      • ‘These three steps will go a long way towards lowering the risk of virus infection on the internet.’
      • ‘I can't promise any miracles, but a small amount of regular practice can go a long way, over time.’
      • ‘Their meager paychecks didn't go very far, but the stores didn't have many products to sell anyway.’
  • 9[no object] (of an article) be regularly kept or put in a particular place:

    ‘remember which card goes in which slot’
    • ‘I was sure that socks went in the top drawer down and pants in the second drawer.’
    • ‘We've sent them E-mails explaining what goes where.’
    • ‘My cases go in the cupboard under the stairs.’
    • ‘Glasses go right side up in the cupboard.’
    be kept, belong, have a place, be found, be located
    View synonyms
    1. 9.1 Fit into a particular place or space:
      ‘you're trying to squeeze a quart into a pint pot, and it just won't go’
      • ‘Call me a fusspot, but I don't see why the fire-fighting equipment couldn't have gone in the dressing table.’
      • ‘On the corner Agnes, Will, and Casper were waiting by a large mailbox and Agnes was trying to fit her head through the tiny slot where the mail goes.’
      • ‘‘It's like a key to a door,’ he says. ‘You're sure you've got the right key. But it just won't go in the damned lock.’’
      • ‘Slowly pour the liquid until the reservoir is close to full (basically to the point where no more liquid goes in).’
  • 10[no object] (of a song or account) have a specified content or wording:

    ‘if you haven't heard it, the story goes like this’
    • ‘Where there's muck, there's brass, the saying goes.’
    • ‘On top of this, so the theory goes, our modern society has successfully eliminated physical activity from our daily lives.’
    • ‘As the old saying goes, as one door closes, so another one opens.’
    • ‘‘Ever heard that song?’ ‘No, how does it go?’ she asked.’
    • ‘If Flynn's personal magnetism was enough to bring the company to Glasgow, the argument goes, another leader could take the company elsewhere.’
    • ‘Education, so the argument goes, is about empowerment - about increasing students' confidence by making them feel good about themselves.’
    • ‘There's an old Jefferson Airplane song that goes something like ‘Don't you want somebody to love’.’
    • ‘He could hardly make a living with his print designs and the story goes that he had to repair and sell straw mats to survive.’
    • ‘As the saying goes, time flies when you're having fun.’
    • ‘As the saying goes, politics makes strange bed-fellows.’
    • ‘As the saying goes, truth is stranger than fiction.’
    • ‘As the saying goes: there's no smoke without fire.’
    • ‘When the Dutch handed control over Aceh to Indonesia in 1949, so this version of history goes, this was yet another illegal act.’
    • ‘Eat, drink and be merry is the way the saying goes.’
    • ‘Stop the funding, the theory goes, and the projects won't happen.’
    • ‘Like the old saying goes, if it ain't broke, don't fix it.’
    • ‘As the saying goes, a fool and his £10 are soon parted.’
    • ‘As the traditional sales maxim goes, if you have a good experience of a company you'll tell two or three others, but if you have a bad experience you'll tell 10.’
    • ‘As the joke goes: ‘How many psychiatrists does it take to change a light bulb?’’
    • ‘It's a slowish record, but the only thing I know is the chorus which goes ‘Oh, look what you've done, you've made a fool of everyone’.’
    1. 10.1go by/under Be known or called by (a specified name):
      ‘he now goes under the name Charles Perez’
      • ‘For many, this aspect of sociolinguistics is synonymous with the whole field which goes by that name.’
      • ‘As the route climbs out of Glen Nochty it passes an old house that goes by the curious name of Duffdefiance.’
      • ‘It goes by the name of perspectivism or situatedness or social constructionism.’
      • ‘Long ago, when he was just a schoolboy, his closest friend had gone by the name St. James.’
      • ‘I received several of these messages from another scammer going by the name Brian Mercy.’
      • ‘I have recently taken the advice of a charlatan going by the name of Dr. Spinola.’
      • ‘But taking the train is still the most fitting way to reach the old Railway Hotel, which these days goes under the name of Hotel Sofitel Central Hua Hin.’
      • ‘In Africa and parts of Indonesia, the game goes by the name Milo and points are scored differently.’
      • ‘Keiji was so tired of going by false names and, a lot of the times, no name at all.’
      • ‘I remember when Pearl was at high school, there was this one guy who went by the name Jim Silk.’
      • ‘Nancy may be going by the name ‘Flora’ and may have altered her appearance to look like an older woman.’
      • ‘The second generation of sociobiologists, who are much more circumspect in avoiding some of the brash pronouncements of the 1970s, go under the name of ‘evolutionary psychologists’.’
      • ‘It turns out that fibromyalgia went by a different name two centuries ago.’
      • ‘As far as the actual game goes, I have acquired a new personal hero who goes by the name of Roque Santa Cruz.’
      • ‘The reason I was going by my middle name was for that very reason, because he hated it.’
      • ‘This is the primary difficulty with some of what goes by the name of Catholic social teaching.’
      • ‘They were both Czech, and I have no idea what their stories were but they were definitely going by fake names.’
      • ‘While he is known to News of the World readers by one name, he admits to going by several others.’
      • ‘The name given in the book was Victorine Le Normand but the famous fortune teller went under the name of Marie-Anne Adelaide Le Normand.’
      • ‘There is a hairdresser in the programme who goes by the name of Roisin.’
    2. 10.2informal [with direct speech] Say:
      ‘the kids go, ‘Yeah, sure.’’
      • ‘So now I look back at a lot of that stuff and I go, ‘What was I thinking?’’
      • ‘So I kind of went ‘yeah, good to meet you’, and he turned around and I never said another word to him; he couldn't have cared less!’
      • ‘John didn't really want to be that involved. I mean, I had a drink with him at Russo and Franks, and he goes, ‘It's your movie now!’’
      • ‘I was still sat there when this cop comes up and goes, ‘You best be clearing off and getting home son.’’
      • ‘Then this punk is like talking to his teacher, and the teacher goes, ‘You've got no grip on reality do you boy?’’
  • 11informal [no object] Use a toilet; urinate or defecate:

    ‘he had to go but couldn't, because she was still in the bathroom’
    • ‘‘Why can't you control yourself?’ ‘How can you, when you want to go? I'm sorry.’’
    • ‘You may notice that you need to pass water more often; have very little warning before you need to go, and sometimes do not reach the lavatory in time.’
    • ‘She has also developed a device for older children that reminds them to wash their hands after going to the loo.’
  • 12informal [no object] Used to emphasize the speaker's annoyance at someone's action:

    ‘then he goes and spoils it all’
    [with present participle] ‘don't go poking your nose where you shouldn't’
    • ‘I know he's madly in love with her and she goes and shatters his heart in tiny little pieces by using that age old excuse of hers that she doesn't have the time.’
    • ‘After predicting that Clark would be the eventual nominee he goes and ruins my career as a political prognosticator by dropping out of the race.’
    • ‘It's only a matter of time before she goes and spoils it all with an act of self-destructive petulance or a complete misreading of a perfectly innocent situation.’
    • ‘I was mentioning the dangerously addictive nature of blogs yesterday and now the New York Times goes and does a feature on it.’
    • ‘You've got no goddamned right to go poking around in that computer.’
    • ‘It is important to note that James won't see this until this Saturday at his birthday, unless one of you rotten bastards reading this goes and tells him.’
    • ‘And then she goes and spoils it all by doing something stupid like releasing an album.’
    • ‘What a surprise - just when you thought Weller would never do it again, he goes and does it.’
    • ‘Why the hell do you have to go and spoil it for the rest of us?’
    • ‘Honestly, the one decent Christmas-related idea I've ever had, and somebody's only gone and stolen it.’
    • ‘You tell her one thing but out of spite, she goes and does the exact opposite.’
    • ‘Just when he thinks things can't get any worse, he goes and does exactly what he does best - make an eejit of himself.’
    • ‘So don't go trying to tell me what to do.’
    • ‘Just as I've got used to living without her she goes and does that to me.’

noun

informal
  • 1British An attempt or trial at something:

    ‘have a go at answering the questions yourself’
    • ‘It is something I have always wanted to have a go at and the noise it makes is fantastic.’
    • ‘The machine is supposed to take up to eight attempts to hit the spot, so I'll give it another couple of goes before writing it off.’
    • ‘I worked for a while as a deputy manager of a leisure centre, but then I decided to have a go at what I always wanted to do, becoming a police officer.’
    • ‘Coming from a swimming background and with a keen interest in running, she decided to take the advice of friends late last year and give triathlon a go.’
    • ‘It would be devastation for me if we were relegated because it's taken us umpteen goes to get in in the Premiership.’
    • ‘What with it being a double roll-over on Saturday I had had a couple of goes and when I checked my numbers on Sunday I realised my lucky dip line had won me ten pounds.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, it's the only theorem I remember from school. That may be why it took me two goes to get my maths O level.’
    • ‘We hope to see all our regulars and maybe some people who have always wanted to have a go at playing snooker but never tried.’
    • ‘I was reluctant at first as the staff were nearly all youngsters in their teens and early twenties, but I decided to give it a go.’
    • ‘I will be having a go at doing one of the flower arrangements myself.’
    attempt, try, effort, bid, endeavour
    View synonyms
  • 2British A person's turn to use or do something:

    ‘I had a go on Nigel's racing bike’
    ‘come on Tony, it's your go’
    • ‘Do you want to have a go on my guitar?’
    • ‘He played around with my stereo and I even let him have a go on my computer.’
    • ‘If the next person cannot play then the person whose go it is must pick up.’
    • ‘I listened… for a while… then kinda got tired so I zoned out a bit until it was my go.’
    • ‘You can have a go on the swings in the village.’
    1. 2.1 Used in reference to a single item, action, or spell of activity:
      ‘he drank a pint in one go’
      ‘they now cost about fifty quid a go’
      ‘Chris often covers 400–500 miles at a go’
      • ‘50p a go is not to be sneezed at, although I won't get a cheque until I am due £50.’
      • ‘He poured himself a glass of milk and downed it in one go.’
      • ‘At thirty quid a go, there was no way I'd try it.’
      • ‘In summary, if you receive a demand for the return of overpaid tax credits, don't feel obliged to pay it all in one go.’
      • ‘There was only one main road that crossed east to west across the island - and this could only take one line of traffic at a go.’
  • 3British [mass noun] Spirit, animation, or energy:

    ‘there's no go in me at all these days’
    • ‘Over the 30 years I have been at Altrincham, I've done nearly every job and at 47 there's still plenty of go left in me yet.’
    • ‘I'm looking for people with a bit of go about them, who enjoy an adventure, are fit and motivated to work and who are prepared to use their initiative.’
    • ‘The Yaris is a young driver's car and one that will please both the boy-racers and the ladies who expect their city car to have a bit of go and a bit of show.’
    • ‘With 280 bhp and 363 Nm torque, the Nissan has lots of go under any circumstances.’
    • ‘My wife has a lot of go in her. She's definitely going to be one of the last ones at a party like that.’
    • ‘Physically, he is a wonderful man…very wiry, and full of energy and go.’
    energy, vigour, vitality, life, liveliness, animation, vivacity, spirit, spiritedness, verve, enthusiasm, zest, vibrancy, spark, sparkle, effervescence, exuberance, brio, buoyancy, perkiness, sprightliness
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1 Vigorous activity:
      ‘it's all go around here’
      • ‘Alexa had started work at 6 am and it had been all go ever since.’
      • ‘What a busy week. It is just go go go and no rest for the wicked.’
      • ‘All in all, his life seems to be all go, as he has some other projects in hand as well, but he is enjoying it.’
  • 4dated A state of affairs:

    ‘this seems a rum sort of go’
    • ‘It's a very rum go, and in the end, despite the occasional hoots of sardonic delight which it all provokes, it just makes you feel a bit depressed.’
    • ‘That husband of hers, still doing the cooking? Saw him on telly the other day. He had an apron on. Seems a rum sort of go. In my day we left cooking to the women.’
    1. 4.1 An attack of illness:
      ‘he's had this nasty go of dysentery’
      • ‘He's had this nasty go of dysentery, it's left him really rather weak.’
  • 5North American An enterprise which has been approved:

    ‘tell them the project is a go’
    • ‘We should know if the sale is a go for sure by late September or early October.’
    • ‘For anybody who doesn't know, it seems that our move to London is a go, details and timeline to be determined.’
    • ‘I received another e-mail from JoAnn. She said the project is a go.’

adjective

informal
  • [predicative] Functioning properly:

    ‘all systems go’
    • ‘It is all systems go here in Dublin. We have moved into new premises and are commencing our advertising and marketing campaign.’
    • ‘Eat less than 1,200 calories a day - the minimum amount most women need to keep all systems go - and you will likely burn lean muscle mass instead of fat.’

Usage

The use of go followed by and, as in I must go and change (rather than I must go to change), is extremely common but is regarded by some grammarians as an oddity. For more details, see and

Phrases

  • all the go

    • informal, dated In fashion.

      • ‘Expansive, grand effects are all the go for the present mo - nobody wants to know about nuts and bolts.’
      • ‘Designer labels and power dressing were all the go.’
      • ‘Not only does its very concept paint a picture of happier days gone by, where a slower, simpler way of rural life was all the go.’
      • ‘Feather boas, by the way, and full length evening gloves will be all the go on the social scene this season.’
      • ‘In the 1970s, as many will recall, sociobiology was all the go.’
  • as (or so) far as it goes

    • Bearing in mind its limitations (said when qualifying praise of something):

      ‘the book is a useful catalogue as far as it goes’
      • ‘All of this is true so far as it goes, but it ignores the one big question: Who is going to pay for all of this?’
      • ‘This is true in so far as it goes, but it ignores the personal nature of the duty an employer has to each of his individual employees.’
      • ‘I follow the results of Bolton Wanderers and Manchester City but that's about as far as it goes.’
      • ‘Vaca's argument is true as far as it goes - which isn't far at all.’
      • ‘Perlstein's diagnosis is clever and persuasive, as far as it goes.’
      • ‘His reasoning is sound so far as it goes, and he's produced an enjoyable and thought-provoking read that I highly recommend.’
      • ‘Now, I'm not sure the underlying change of policy here is wrong-headed, at least as far as it goes, or even that it represents a change.’
      • ‘I'm a big Joni Mitchell and Fairport Convention fan, but that's about as far as it goes.’
      • ‘‘Plan ahead’ is excellent advice, so far as it goes.’
      • ‘In so far as it goes, it is based on fact, experience and experiment.’
  • as —— go

    • Compared to the average or typical one of the specified kind:

      ‘as castles go it is small and old’
      • ‘The company's founders chose it for their search engine because, as numbers go, it is a very, very big one.’
      • ‘I've traveled this highway hundreds of times, and for about three months on a near daily basis, and as far as freeways go it's still by far my favorite.’
      • ‘And as bargains go, surely £6.75 for a three-course lunch qualifies!’
      • ‘Sure, as lies go, this one is pretty inconsequential - almost pro-forma.’
      • ‘After sticking our heads into various hostels to inquire about prices, we picked one a few blocks from the square which was very clean, as hostels go.’
      • ‘The Inn is fine, as inns go, but there's something about Sea Isle City that feels depressingly generic.’
      • ‘He's pretty undemanding, as far as boyfriends go.’
      • ‘And I guess, as lawyers go, he's a pretty good lawyer.’
      • ‘Well, as blogs go, this is a very professional one.’
      • ‘People rail against my paper, and I freely admit its faults, but as papers go I think it's one of the best.’
  • (from) go to whoa

    • informal From start to finish:

      ‘it was a tense meeting from go to whoa’
      • ‘He went right through the state system from go to whoa.’
      • ‘She was pleased to have been able to maintain her intensity from go to whoa.’
      • ‘She followed the process from go to whoa in this three-part series.’
      • ‘From go to whoa, the compilation has something to prove, and isn't about to waste a track as it makes its case.’
      • ‘We see that the process from go to whoa to set up an aquaculture management area can take many years indeed.’
      • ‘From go to whoa, the crowd just cheered continuously.’
      • ‘The director has you on the edge of your seat from go to whoa with this slick, totally cool adaptation of the thriller.’
      • ‘I had to fill him in on the whole story, from go to whoa.’
      • ‘Cameras would be everywhere, filming the whole process from go to whoa.’
      • ‘If you want us to do the whole job from go to whoa, you simply supply the art and tell us how you want it framed.’
  • from the word go

    • informal From the very beginning.

      • ‘It really is best to get the facts straight from the word go.’
      • ‘Suddenly he found himself watching almost as many games from the subs' bench as he was playing in - an imbalance he is anxious to put right this time round, right from the word go.’
      • ‘Michael dictated the pace of the game from the word go.’
      • ‘The season ticket which I purchased will not be renewed next season, I feel cheated by the playing staff who have been given every encouragement from the word go.’
      • ‘The winners were in total control from the word go in a totally one-sided contest.’
      • ‘The New Zealander was apparently in uncommunicative form from the word go, and quickly passed to the angry stage before clamming up completely.’
      • ‘There was drama from the word go as the downpour made the heavy ground at Aintree even more demanding.’
      • ‘The boxing match was a fiasco right from the word go.’
      • ‘It's been a difficult project from the word go and I've already spent two years on it.’
      • ‘We have not been happy with the investigation from the word go.’
  • get going

    • 1Leave a place in order to go somewhere else:

      ‘it's been wonderful seeing you again, but I think it's time we got going’
      • ‘I think we should probably get going.’
      • ‘Well, I really have to get going if I want to catch that flight.’
      • ‘That's the bell, then lets get going!’
      • ‘You have to get going to school.’
      • ‘I guess I'd better get going in order to make that appointment.’
      • ‘He looked at the alarm clock, "Oh boy, I better get going."’
      • ‘All sorts of stuff to do, I probably should get going.’
      • ‘John looked at his watch and said that we'd better get going.’
      • ‘Keegan lowered her head mumble for them to get going.’
      • ‘I'd better get going soon.’
    • 2Start happening or taking place:

      ‘the campaign got going in 1983’
      • ‘The overall 2004/5 programme of 56 projects has been slow to get going.’
      • ‘Nice in depth coverage you've got going on there.’
      • ‘Some days, you never really get going at all.’
      • ‘Once we got going in the second half, won cleaner possession, then we began to play our own game.’
      • ‘Once I get going I'm sure it will turn into a selling obsession.’
      • ‘We've got unemployment high, consumer confidence low, stock market can't get going.’
      • ‘Certainly, we need something to spark to life a season in which we just haven't got going.’
      • ‘Weather conditions are still too bleak to get going with the rod comfortably.’
      • ‘British pop history doesn't start with them, but they are its 1066-the point at which the traditional curriculum really gets going.’
      • ‘When he gets going he is very formidable and takes some stopping.’
      start, begin, get under way, go ahead
      View synonyms
  • get someone going

    • informal Make someone angry or sexually aroused:

      ‘I want a girl who's sexy, but in a subtle way—that's what gets me going’
      • ‘I suppose everyone has certain triggers that get them going, I've never really liked phones, I can go for months without using my mobile and so the idea of an extended phone sex call doesn't do much for me.’
      • ‘This got Chig going, leading him to compose the following reply.’
      • ‘This got me going - as you can see from the comment I left.’
      • ‘It got me going because he's from York and I used to train him.’
      • ‘It was when they started talking about Vieri that it really got me going.’
      • ‘It was the trousers that really got her going though, in particular the ample rear area that carried the word ‘Heartbreaker’.’
      • ‘This got us going and we both said that we'd rather they voted Tory than not at all, people had died to get the vote etc.’
      • ‘The fact that her sister might not be fully sleeping and know what we were doing and possibly be aroused herself got me going even more.’
      • ‘Imagine how difficult it would be to ever fulfil your dream of having sex with a woman with a ship on her head, if that was all that could get you going.’
      • ‘I don't get really mad these days, even when people lie about my finances, but he gets me going like no one else can.’
      stir up, rouse, arouse, excite, galvanize, electrify, stimulate, inspire, move, fire up, fire the enthusiasm of, fire the imagination of, whip up, inflame, agitate, goad, provoke, spur on, urge, encourage, animate, incite
      View synonyms
  • get something going

    • Succeed in starting a machine, vehicle, process, etc.:

      ‘we got the car going again after much trying’
      • ‘That means the road, installation of the turbine and getting it going.’
      • ‘Well, Bryan got his crusade going a few years before the 1925 Scopes Trial.’
      • ‘Bob Cardoza, the arts center's first chairman, died of cancer in 2002, and Dick Lang, who got the project going, died in 2004.’
      operate, switch on, turn on, start, start off, start up, set going, trigger off, trigger, trip, set in motion, activate, actuate, initiate, initialize, energize, animate
      View synonyms
  • go figure!

    • informal Said to express the belief that something is amazing or incredible:

      ‘there'll even (go figure) be an Elvis impersonator’
      • ‘This is a reality series watched by 40 million Americans every week - go figure.’
      • ‘Turns out, he was going to break it off with the other woman anyway. (Seems that he doesn't actually have enough time for two girlfriends - go figure.)’
      • ‘We six kids are very close together in age, with my next sister being 10 and a half months younger than me - go figure! - which has always led me to believe that mum and dad kind of liked each other.’
      • ‘When I've invited them to parties and explained they were ‘for adults only’, they never can find a baby sitter (go figure).’
      • ‘Well, all the good looking women were sitting with the physicists' table (go figure!) so I had to settle for sitting next to Steve Case.’
  • go halves (or shares)

    • Share something equally:

      ‘she'd promised to go halves with him if he got anywhere in the negotiations’
      • ‘Three blokes are going shares in building this new house.’
      • ‘Incredibly, he won the £20,000 jackpot but with humbling generosity he is keeping his word to go halves and now wants Marge to get in touch because he has lost her phone number.’
      • ‘My brother is 24 years old and was the only one in the family offered to go halves with my parents in a property near Noosa, a stunning part of Queensland.’
      • ‘‘I'll go halves with you either way,’ I replied.’
      • ‘In that case, I know you can afford to go halves.’
      • ‘I ordered it last week but didn't say anything as it was a surprise for Mum and Dad, who had previously agreed to go halves with me.’
      • ‘She does know that in Dunedin, Jack met up with Jimmy Wai, a cousin from his village, and was persuaded to go shares in starting up the business.’
      • ‘The asking price was IR £40,000, but we were strapped and couldn't afford it and neither could the other couple, so we decided to go halves, taking an acre apiece.’
      • ‘I didn't tell him that during the summer we had come to an arrangement with the neighbours on the other side of our house - the ones who owned the falling-down fence on that side - to go halves on the costs of replacing it.’
      • ‘So i chimed in and said that i'd go halves with him.’
  • going!, gone!

    • An auctioneer's announcement that bidding is closing or closed.

      • ‘Joan Livesey's semi will soon be going, going, gone - on TV.’
      • ‘By then, his reputation and standing in New York's high society will be going, going, gone.’
      • ‘It will be a case of going, going, gone next Tuesday when buy4now.com launches a real time lunchtime auction site.’
      • ‘Going, going, gone will be heard all tomorrow as the hammer comes down at Debenham's on Manningham Lane, Bradford.’
      • ‘But their early free fall practically ensures that Beltran will be going, going, gone before the July 31 non-waiver trade deadline.’
      • ‘Councillors will be going, going, gone next month when they are put under the hammer as lots in a charity slave auction.’
  • go off on one

    • informal Become very angry or excited:

      ‘Jim just went off on one, ranting and raving like a madman, telling me he could do what he wanted’
      • ‘To make things worse, as we were leaving, Malcolm suggested we go for a drink, and JPK went off on one again.’
      • ‘Sophie tuned out as Darren went off on one again, shouting and swearing about what she had said like he always did.’
      • ‘At this point, he went off on one, and we were scribbling furiously, but his PR geezer stopped us from telling the whole story.’
      • ‘Anyway, it was really funny because George totally went off on one, getting really emotional and carried away with defending his right to speak despite the fact that he is a bit of a washed-up pop star.’
      • ‘Greeny goes off on one if he has trouble parking his car of a morning!’
      • ‘When she was informed in apologetic terms, that due to unexpected large volumes coming in at the same time her film was going to be late, she went off on one!’
      • ‘The only problem I'm having at the moment is that everyone is English and before you go off on one, its not that I don't like the English, it's just that having a few Paddies around is always good for a laugh.’
      • ‘I sit there sometimes in the stand when Les is going off on one, belting 15 blokes and running all over the place, wondering ‘just how do you stop him?’.’
      • ‘I didn't want you all to think that I was going off on one again about a guy who'd never contact me.’
      • ‘It's not often that I go off on one: I try to live my life in a relaxed way, not allowing the inconsequential details in life to rile me.’
  • going on —— (british also going on for ——)

    • Approaching a specified time, age, or amount:

      ‘I was going on fourteen when I went to my first gig’
      • ‘It wasn't hard for Pearson and Kelly to find summer jobs since Pearson was seventeen and Kelly was going on it.’
      • ‘He did have a job but never really bothered to do anything productive. There aren't many things you can do when you're sixteen going on seventeen.’
      • ‘Dorfman plays the neurotic child like he's eight going on 38.’
      • ‘Aren't you a little old for this? You're going on forty-five, Elena.’
  • go (to) it

    • informal Act in an energetic or dissipated way:

      ‘Go it, Dad! Give him what for!’
      • ‘You've got your missions. Go to it.’
      • ‘And, as if two books in a matter of months wasn't going it just a bit, her new novella, Beasts, is being published by Orion in March.’
  • go to show (or prove)

    • (of an occurrence) serve as evidence or proof of something:

      ‘the whole mess goes to show that faith in the chairman is no substitute for studying the balance sheet’
      • ‘It just goes to show that the whole protest culture is fundamentally flawed.’
      • ‘The craft-work too was beautiful and went to show how beauty can be created by skilful hands and patience.’
      • ‘The past few weeks have been full of near-misses, near-disasters and have just gone to show what we knew all along - that the new pilots don't know what they're doing.’
      • ‘The projects launched that evening went to show what could be achieved if one could mobilise community support, he said.’
      • ‘Evidently none of the guys who ended up there are terribly happy with their new positions either, so it just goes to prove that it's not just me, but the whole situation…’
      • ‘His silence at last week's press conference - and the chaos which filled it - only went to show again how much the party will suffer from his absence.’
      • ‘Most of this just goes to show that you can fool some of the people, some of the time.’
      • ‘It went to prove that if the classical art forms were losing out to modern times, the fault was with the audience and not with the art.’
      • ‘It just goes to show how thin the line is between success and failure.’
      • ‘This was Kevin's third win in four years and it just goes to show how much talent this fine young man has.’
  • go well

    • Used to express good wishes to someone leaving.

      • ‘‘They are going aboard already. So long, people.’ ‘Go well, Thandi.’’
  • have a go at

    • Attack or criticize (someone):

      ‘she's always having a go at me’
      • ‘I feel that I'm always having a go at Lori in her comments, which I'm not, because I like Lori, and certainly wish she would post more.’
      • ‘The problem is my aunt and uncle are always having a go at me.’
      • ‘Personally, I suspected that Jaden and Lisa liked each other, even though it always seemed they were having a go at each other, they just didn't want to admit it.’
      • ‘This was with a guy I'd had problems with over the years; he was having a go at a friend of mine so I beat him up, then robbed him.’
      • ‘I have always stuck up for the players and not publicly had a go at them when they've not played particularly well.’
      • ‘Not everyone has the presence of mind or courage of Mrs Beauchamp, although we would never recommend having a go at an intruder.’
      • ‘At election times, they were always having a go at him and ribbing him about his unwavering support for me.’
      • ‘I think there's more understanding now, but let's face it, the fans need someone at the top to have a go at when the club isn't giving them the happiness they want.’
      • ‘It's normal that the two big rivals in any league will always have a go at each other.’
      • ‘Even when he was having a go at the critics, he remained incredibly dignified.’
      attack, censure, criticize, denounce, condemn, arraign, find fault with, lambaste, pillory, disapprove of, carp at, cavil at, rail against, inveigh against, cast aspersions on, pour scorn on, disparage, denigrate, deprecate, malign, vilify, besmirch, run down, give a bad press to
      slur
      knock, pan, slam, hammer, blast, bad-mouth, nitpick about, throw brickbats at, give flak to, lay into, lace into, pull to pieces, pull apart, pick holes in, hit out at, maul, savage, roast, skewer, crucify
      slag off, give some stick to, slate, monster, rubbish
      pummel, cut up, trash
      bag
      rate
      slash, vituperate against, reprobate
      animadvert on, objurgate, excoriate, asperse, derogate, reprehend
      View synonyms
  • have —— going for one

    • informal Used to indicate how much someone has in their favour or to their advantage:

      ‘Why did she do it? She had so much going for her’
      • ‘We may be a small island, but we do have something going for us - a sense of humour.’
      • ‘Melissa was a bright, attractive, popular teenager with everything going for her.’
      • ‘As comedies, they have many things going for them: when good, they're fast, funny entertainment and they have license to be vulgar in the most endearing way.’
      • ‘You have a lot going for you, but most people will only remember you for one thing, and a lot of them will try to copy it.’
      • ‘She had so much going for her. Every teacher I spoke to at parents' evenings always said Carly could be anything she wanted to be.’
      • ‘I am attractive, have a good job and have a lot going for me.’
      • ‘Small businesses have several things going for them.’
      • ‘We have a few things going for us today that we didn't in 1991.’
      • ‘We have a great thing going for us at the club and we want to keep on the winning track.’
      • ‘So, for a city with no urban radio station, no artists signed to major labels, and no videos in heavy rotation, we seem to have a lot going for us.’
      • ‘Swindon is trying to attract people and we have a lot going for us, we are right between London and Bristol, with easy access to all sorts of great places and Wiltshire is a lovely place to live in.’
  • make a go of

    • informal Be successful in (something):

      ‘he's determined to make a go of his marriage’
      • ‘But Ben is determined to make a go of his stage career.’
      • ‘I owe that job a lot: it was the first time I was being paid to do drama and it got me thinking I could actually make a go of being a professional actor.’
      • ‘The worst, though, was to come in the summer of 2002 when he resolved, despite everything, to make a go of it in his last season at the club.’
      • ‘Six months ago her sentence was deferred to see if she could stay out of trouble and make a go of her life.’
      • ‘Just getting cracking and making a go of bringing up kids on your own isn't news!’
      • ‘And now that Chris is here, making a go of his business, he has no intentions of heading home.’
      • ‘Even after picking up that guitar and making a go of it as a musician, he still revels in the reputation of being a bad man, a womanizer, a hard drinker; that's at least part of the appeal for people who buy his records.’
      • ‘As for the town centre, the businesses cannot make a go of it because there is simply not enough trade.’
      • ‘He said that last year he had found work at BMW and was making a go of his life.’
      • ‘The Portuguese couple are making a go of the plantations again as well as growing chillies and pineapples.’
  • on the go

    • informal Very active or busy:

      ‘he's dead beat, he's been on the go all evening’
      • ‘On Sunday he hosted his Captain's Prize and again was on the go from dawn to dusk - or should that be dawn to dawn?’
      • ‘I need to find something of interest that involves me being on the go, as I'm aware I'm not actually that active.’
      • ‘It is a big change from the years when he started in September and would be on the go constantly until the following April.’
      • ‘Morag has an enormous amount of energy, she's constantly on the go.’
      • ‘As summer merges into autumn the grey squirrels are on the go again.’
      • ‘I was one of those people who had always been on the go, and then suddenly everything was brought to a full stop.’
      • ‘The lads are continuously on the go and travel to all parts of the country.’
      • ‘The defence was excellent, in midfield they played a stormer, and the forwards were constantly on the go.’
      • ‘By that point I'd been on the go for about 13 hours, so I said my goodbyes and we nabbed our night bus back.’
      • ‘It is the right model if you want to download and play back music files, browse the Internet and do some office work while on the go.’
      busy, occupied, employed, hard at work, wrapped up
      hard-pressed
      on the job, absorbed in, engrossed in, immersed in, preoccupied with
      active, lively, industrious, bustling, energetic, tireless
      busy as a bee, hard at it
      on the hop
      View synonyms
  • to be going on with

    • To start with; for the time being:

      ‘this is not a full critical appraisal but it will do to be going on with’
      • ‘Still, I've had enough to be going on with while I've been waiting to hear.’
      • ‘She blanches and explains that we have probably got enough pictures to be going on with and perhaps it's time to move on without testing the patience of this nice man any longer.’
      • ‘Merely racking up appearances at club level is enough to be going on with for a youngster who will turn 21 in April, though.’
      • ‘While the former manager can claim to have won seven championships in a row, seven derby wins on the bounce is enough for the incumbent to be going on with.’
      • ‘That's enough information to be going on with, isn't it boys?’
      • ‘Whether or not that's true, there's still plenty to be going on with.’
      • ‘Snooker fans are destined to hear much more about the 22-year-old in the future but here are a few facts to be going on with.’
      • ‘But what we have is quite enough to be going on with: a bracingly intelligent documentary that treats its audience like grown-ups and has the force and sinew of real history and real politics.’
      • ‘So I had a tidy little sum to be going on with, and I live with my Auntie Doll, my mum's youngster sister, in Beckenham, Kent.’
      • ‘At least, that's what… but no, I think I've said enough to be going on with.’
  • to go

    • (of food or drink from a restaurant or cafe) to be eaten or drunk off the premises:

      ‘one large cheese-and-peppers pizza, to go’
      ‘if possible, grab a to-go coffee and hit the road early’
      • ‘I had a revelation recently, when I stopped into Pendelis to get a pizza to go.’
      • ‘Having watched too many US films where successful, busy, career people scream for ‘a latte and a Danish to go’, we don't feel we are truly glamorous unless we come bowling into the office juggling Styrofoam cups, pastries and a newspaper.’
  • what goes around comes around

    • proverb The consequences of one's actions will have to be dealt with eventually.

      • ‘It's nice to know what goes around comes around.’
      • ‘But although I strive daily to do the right thing - believing firmly in the karmic law that what goes around comes around - I've never, ever aspired to returning to earth as the Dalai Lama.’
      • ‘I really feel that there is a responsibility and what goes around comes around.’
      • ‘I only hope what goes around comes around in your case, and one day you get caught.’
      • ‘Watford were on the receiving end of some decisions tonight as we were on Saturday, so what goes around comes around.’
      • ‘I'm a big believer in what goes around comes around and we have always been well treated by the older generation and I'm just trying to put a bit back.’
      • ‘I have no idea what makes someone go to those lengths, but I believe what goes around comes around and she has got what she deserved.’
      • ‘And it's a powerful belief, offering both hope to the oppressed - suffering cannot last forever - and a warning to the oppressor - take care, what goes around comes around.’
      • ‘For the real, harsh truth about life is mostly that what goes around comes around.’
      • ‘We're having to fund it too, because as in all things, what goes around comes around - although we were paying for legal aid anyway, but I don't suppose the Government's given that money back.’
  • who goes there?

    • Said by a sentry as a challenge.

      • ‘Three hundred metres further on Police Superintendent John Trott halted the marchers by standing in the roadway and calling ‘who goes there?’’
      • ‘‘Halt, who goes there?’ yelled the larger of the men at arms that stood atop the large wall.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • go about

    • 1Begin or carry on with (an activity):

      ‘you are going about this in the wrong way’
      • ‘They went about their task with commendable commitment, skill and enthusiasm.’
      • ‘As she goes about her mundane activities, she recalls episodes decades before that might have changed her life.’
      • ‘Publicity of this kind must be very harrowing for a normal, everyday woman going about her business.’
      • ‘Only hours earlier, he had been going about his business as normal.’
      • ‘The birds were singing and the townsfolk were going about their normal business.’
      • ‘Westin spoke to me from his New York office, and began by explaining how he went about his research.’
      • ‘The king and queen went about their daily activities as calmly as possible, trying to mask their uneasiness.’
      • ‘By the time he was finished, the sun was up and the villagers were going about their daily activities.’
      • ‘I went about my normal day in the shop, maybe a little busier than normal as it was leading up to Mother's Day weekend.’
      • ‘He stood in the door as she went about making her breakfast.’
      • ‘The documentary follows Mandela as he goes about his day-to-day activities in Europe, Asia, Africa and America, to uncover this truly extraordinary man.’
      set about, begin, embark on, make a start on, start, address oneself to, get down to, get to work on, get going on, undertake
      approach, tackle, attack
      get cracking on, get cracking with
      commence
      View synonyms
    • 2Sailing
      Change to an opposite tack.

  • go against

    • 1Oppose or resist:

      ‘he refused to go against the unions’
      • ‘Her parents went against the hospital's advice and refused to have her admitted into a psychiatric facility.’
      • ‘Let me state, right away, that I do not think the Spanish Prime Minister has gone against anybody's decision.’
      • ‘He was known for his art-world contrariness and for going against mainstream trends.’
      • ‘These women went against the wishes of their husbands to come to this meeting.’
      • ‘When he went against the king's orders and refused to slay a band of barbarian captives, he was promptly put under arrest.’
      • ‘The government is seeking to go against the wishes of the public.’
      • ‘I won't go against my family, if they refuse to give their consent.’
      • ‘With the union leaders going one way, he is unlikely to go against them.’
      • ‘The palace guard, still loyal to Chavez, went against army orders and retook the palace.’
      • ‘Councillors went against a decision made last November by members of a council urgency committee, who voted that the footpath should be closed to protect staff and pupils from violence and harassment.’
      1. 1.1Be contrary to (a feeling or principle):
        ‘these tactics go against many of our instincts’
        • ‘His congregation believes same-sex unions go against basic Anglican beliefs.’
        • ‘However, the act also included a ‘conscience clause’ which allowed people the right to refuse to join up if it went against their beliefs.’
        • ‘I reserve the right to refuse readings that go against my ethics as a reader and my morals as a human being.’
        • ‘The government first opposed the policy, ruling that it goes against the constitution, which guarantees equal education to all.’
        • ‘If we have democratically agreed to go on strike, whatever unjust law they want to bring in to stop us will be going against our human rights as workers.’
        • ‘That is a problem for science, however, because religion is grounded in faith ‘without a need for supporting evidence’, which goes against the principles of scientific inquiry.’
        • ‘If the government goes against our Christian beliefs or ethical obligations we must oppose the demands of the government.’
        • ‘Thankfully, I had foreseen there might be a bit of a problem and, going against my natural aversion for planning ahead, I had checked out the menu in the window to see if they had anything for vegetarians.’
        • ‘He opposed the treaty, arguing that it went against the UN charter and would accelerate the arms race.’
        • ‘Surely it is going against accepted moral principles to recommend such a substitute for the usual methods of contraception?’
      2. 1.2(of a decision or result) be unfavourable for:
        ‘the tribunal's decision went against them’
        • ‘A number of decisions went against us - a couple of hand-balls as well as the penalty which should never have been given.’
        • ‘For the emerging nation he seemed an ideal captain and he won many friends in the series lost in England largely because of some atrocious umpiring decisions which went against South Africa in the final Test.’
        • ‘She realized then that the administration really had been convinced the vote would go against the union.’
        • ‘‘It would be easy for me to look for decisions which went against us, which probably cost us in the end, but I am not in the business of blaming anyone other than myself,’ he said.’
        • ‘We are disappointed in two main decisions which went against us but in the end Middlesbrough probably deserved their win more than we did.’
        • ‘We've been unlucky before, but every team at the bottom end of the league has hard luck stories: decisions that went against them or not getting the breaks they deserved.’
        • ‘Although the United manager admitted Dunn was wrong to disallow Malcolm Christie's stoppage-time effort for Derby, he was more upset by the decisions that went against the champions.’
        • ‘Residents, not just developers, should be allowed to appeal to the Deputy Prime Minister if decisions went against them, an Ilkley district councillor said this week.’
        • ‘Swindon councillor Lisa Hawkes (Con, Highworth) said the town would be in danger of being damaged if the decision went against the council.’
        • ‘The Amicus union's three votes went against Livingstone.’
  • go ahead

    • Proceed or be carried out:

      ‘the project will go ahead’
      • ‘Residents on the street were angered by the scheme and launched a campaign to stop it going ahead.’
      • ‘If the deal went ahead, the combined group would employ more than 135,000 people.’
      • ‘If it goes ahead, the project would be the first of its type in Britain.’
      • ‘If the plan goes ahead environmental improvements will also be carried out.’
      • ‘The performance went ahead, but she was advised to cancel her trip and allow herself time to recuperate.’
      • ‘The trial was postponed time after time, but eventually went ahead in early 2000.’
      • ‘He can't see the project going ahead without more investment in existing companies.’
      • ‘The panel refused to grant the adjournment and went ahead with the hearing.’
      • ‘The transplant went ahead in early 2000, since when Nicola has made a great recovery.’
      • ‘The church warden was able to carry out a quick repair job and the service went ahead as planned.’
  • go along with

    • Consent or agree to (a person or proposal):

      ‘he will probably go along with the idea’
      • ‘She now realises that she is not making any headway and seems to decide to go along with what I have to say.’
      • ‘I have never said I didn't want to pay taxes, I just do not go along with all the methods used to raise them.’
      • ‘She suggested I do a test anyway which I went along with just for her sake.’
      • ‘I've never gone along with all the talk about Michael and me being too much alike to work as a partnership.’
      • ‘They would probably just go along with it in the hope of getting some sexual satisfaction.’
      • ‘The administration has finally gone along with what we in Congress have been proposing, which was an increase of about 25,000 in the Army.’
      • ‘It's easy to go along with what friends are saying about a person and believe every word.’
      • ‘Would people or parliament have gone along with that?’
      • ‘I humour them by pretending to go along with all this, but I keep my own counsel on the matter.’
      • ‘My wife wanted a church wedding for the right reasons, and I was more than happy to go along with that.’
      agree to, agree with, fall in with, comply with, concur with, cooperate with, acquiesce in, assent to, follow
      submit to, bow to, yield to, defer to
      View synonyms
  • go around

  • go around with

    • Be regularly in the company of:

      ‘he goes around with some of the local lads’
      • ‘It's said that it's unfair that men can go around with younger women and not cause a murmur, and yet older women can't be seen with younger men without being thought, well, rather disgusting.’
      • ‘And I talked it over with my wife and we decided it was a very tough thing to do to go out and talk about it and I knew very little about it but I learned a lot, went around with some very good people and I began to lecture here and there on drug abuse.’
      • ‘‘Someone needs to talk some sense into that boy,’ she said, quietly, ‘he goes around with that Andrews girl all the time, but she doesn't care about him at all.’
      • ‘Sandra Keen said he had changed his lifestyle, stopped going around with the gang and started a work placement.’
      • ‘So, um, where are the people you're going around with?’
      • ‘At one point in all these shenanigans, Reynolds was asked what he thought of his ex-wife going around with a man who had been accused of murder.’
  • go at

    • Energetically attack or tackle:

      ‘he went at things with a daunting eagerness’
      • ‘The Scottish pack went at their opponents in the loose play and it was clear that they were the equals of England in that division.’
      • ‘The final was a fine advertisement for basketball at this age group as both teams went at each other from the tip off.’
      • ‘We went at it right from the start but then we had to dig in and make sure we didn't lose.’
      • ‘When we went at them we showed that their defence can be exposed.’
      • ‘If we had gone at them I think the points would have been there for the taking.’
      • ‘They went at each other like prize-fighters in a ring.’
      • ‘That both sides found the net within the first 10 minutes was a bona fide reflection of how these teams went at each other from the outset.’
      • ‘The remaining plinths which held the monument have large indentions in them as if someone went at them with a hatchet.’
      • ‘Mother held equally strong opinions and one Saturday morning the two of them went at it on the telephone.’
      • ‘I have gone at it pretty hard this year, even in my off weeks, because I've been preparing for other events, so I'm not sure what my energy level will be after the Ryder Cup.’
  • go back

    • 1(of a clock) be set to an earlier standard time, especially at the end of summertime.

      • ‘The clocks have gone back, summer is over and many of us are dusting off our electric blankets ready for the long cold nights.’
      • ‘The clocks go back tomorrow night and we all get an extra hour in bed on Sunday morning.’
      • ‘The clocks have gone back, the nights are drawing in - don't get miserable, get a tan.’
      • ‘By now even the most unobservant should have realised that British Summer Time is dead and that clocks have gone back one hour.’
      • ‘It sometimes feels like the clocks have gone back to a time before women protested at being seen as just sex objects.’
      • ‘The clocks have gone back, it's getting colder and driving conditions are about to get a great deal tougher.’
      • ‘So the clocks have gone back and it was dark, it seemed by mid afternoon, yesterday, halloween is over and for me it is now winter.’
    • 2(of two people) have known each other for a length of time:

      ‘Victor and I go back a long way’
      • ‘‘Your mother and I go back a long way,’ Finn said.’
  • go back on

    • Fail to keep (a promise):

      ‘he wouldn't go back on his word’
      • ‘Once in office, they famously went back on that promise and said they would not extend the cut-off date beyond 1995.’
      • ‘In his five years as Treasurer he broke solemn promises, went back on guarantees and cooked the books whenever necessary.’
      • ‘But by then I had already made a promise to Dundee, and I wasn't going to go back on my word.’
      • ‘He has promised me he will do it and he has never gone back on a promise.’
      • ‘‘The main reason for my decision is that the Lib-Dem Party has gone back on a key election promise to cut council taxes,’ he said.’
      • ‘But critics claim the decision is premature and that the PCT has gone back on a promise made last spring to find an alternative site.’
      • ‘His motive was that his employer, having promised him the tenancy of the Dolaucothi Arms, had gone back on his word.’
      • ‘Every time they've made a promise, they have gone back on their word.’
      • ‘Auditors are to investigate a claim that councillors have gone back on a promise to spend £1million in the Bank Top area of Blackburn.’
      • ‘The proposal comes several years after the former Tory council went back on promises to create a new youth centre in the area.’
      renege on, break, fail to honour, default on, backtrack on, back out of, repudiate, retract
      go back on one's word, break one's word, break one's promise, do an about-face
      rat on
      View synonyms
  • go down

    • 1(of a ship or aircraft) sink or crash:

      ‘he saw eleven B-17s go down’
      • ‘One Squadron aircraft was seen to go down in flames, exploding in woods.’
      • ‘This feature not only made communication between the crew members difficult, but also proved hazardous if the aircraft went down.’
      • ‘It is thought that the aircraft went down in the vicinity of Camden Ray which is west of Kaktovik, Alaska.’
      • ‘In the past 30 years, hundreds of ships have gone down in mysterious circumstances, taking all hands with them.’
      • ‘Mr Lightoller, second officer on board the stricken liner, was one of the last people to be rescued after the ship went down.’
      • ‘The aircraft, described in the Nevada press as a ‘Flying Fortress,’ had gone down on 21 July 1948 during an atmospheric sampling test.’
      • ‘The crew abandoned ship and she went down, her back broken.’
      • ‘Two Britons were forced to take to a liferaft after their helicopter went down in the sea between Chile and north-west Antarctica.’
      • ‘Ever since Oceanic Air flight 815 went down on a remote Pacific island, I have been agonising over some very important questions.’
      • ‘As the task force once again pounded Truk, more Navy aircraft went down.’
      sink, be submerged, founder, go under
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Be defeated in a contest:
        ‘they went down 2–1’
        • ‘Then, Enfield hosted Nelson as leaders, but went down to a defeat which allowed the Seedhill side to take over at the top, where they've resided since.’
        • ‘Woodstown FC were beaten by Bolton on Saturday last but the locals put up a fine show, eventually going down 3-2.’
        • ‘It was bitter disappointment for the New York lads as the team went down to their heaviest defeat in history.’
        • ‘Farnworth finally went down to their first defeat of the season on Saturday - beaten by the side that looks set to provide them with the strongest title challenge.’
        • ‘York Groves restored some pride against local rivals Wetherby Bulldogs albeit in defeat as they went down 20-12.’
        • ‘His team went down to a depressing defeat, but Celtic manager Martin O'Neill should be congratulated for his behaviour in the aftermath of the event.’
        • ‘They eventually went down 30-24 but could well have snatched it if the game had gone on for a couple more minutes.’
        • ‘Walter Mondale had a similar idea, and he went down in a landslide defeat at the hands of the last Republican president to be re-elected.’
        • ‘Martin Van Buren went down to defeat in 1840 when he ran for re-election.’
        • ‘His best effort yet came at Roland Garros in June, but he went down to a surprise defeat to outsider Martin Verkerk in the semi-finals.’
        lose, be beaten, be defeated, suffer defeat, be vanquished, collapse, come to grief
        View synonyms
    • 2Be recorded or remembered in a particular way:

      ‘his name will go down in history’
      • ‘I would say that he will go down as one of the most significant political diplomatic figures of the past 50 years, as well as being a great spiritual leader.’
      • ‘For extremes of temperature and conditions the summer drought of 1976 and the winter freeze of 1978 will go down as two of the worst on record.’
      • ‘This year's hurricane season will go down as one of the worst on record.’
      • ‘He is a chancellor of genius: he may go down as the greatest.’
      • ‘I suspect it will be the only reason why this novel might go down in literary history.’
      • ‘The seven wins, six losses record won't go down as a great tour and there is no doubt Sir Clive will expect a much better return.’
      • ‘It will go down in history and our children's children will remember these departed colleagues of ours.’
      • ‘The recent Bangalore Test will certainly go down as one of the matches remembered for the poor decisions handed out by the neutral umpires.’
      • ‘If he can do what the Japanese economy needs, he will go down as a great prime minister.’
      • ‘Politicians moaned that 2005 could go down as the most boring election on record.’
      • ‘This year will go down as the worst on record for forest fires in Portugal.’
      be remembered, be recorded, be commemorated, be immortalized
      View synonyms
    • 3Be swallowed:

      ‘solids can sometimes go down much easier than liquids’
      • ‘She swallowed her protests, but they burned as they went down, making her want to gag.’
      • ‘The next few sips went down easier, and then she was drinking it as fast as she could.’
      • ‘He nodded and took more bread. This time, it went down easily.’
      • ‘Sour Patch Kids are a tasty treat and even those idiotic Warhead sour candies go down with barely a pucker, but this candy made me gag.’
      • ‘This was one of the hardest lessons in life Matt had ever swallowed, and it wasn't going down easily, it made him sick.’
      • ‘I squeezed my eyes shut, attempting to swallow the pain, but if it was going to go down, it seemed it was going to just burn my taste buds on the way.’
      • ‘They were made with tequila and vodka, served with whipped cream and went down oh, so easy.’
      • ‘She didn't want to swallow at first but it went down soon enough along with the third and final pill, this time without a hitch.’
      • ‘It takes several swallows of his dry throat for them go down.’
      • ‘He quickly chewed and swallowed hard, thumping his chest to make sure it went down the right way.’
    • 4Elicit a specified reaction:

      ‘my slide shows went down reasonably well’
      • ‘It went down reasonably well and people laughed at the appropriate moments thank God.’
      • ‘Anna Maria Tydings had the honour of getting the entertainment programme up and running and her unique version of The Village of Asdee went down a treat with everyone.’
      • ‘However, his social conservatism went down well.’
      • ‘This year's incoming movies went down well, of course, but the best reaction was reserved for his sequels.’
      • ‘Reactions filter through - the show has gone down seriously well, better than we anticipated.’
      • ‘For some inexplicable reason, my improvised soundtracks don't go down well.’
      • ‘The reason is an unshakeable confidence that it will go down well with large numbers of voters.’
      • ‘It is a varied and interesting display of images, which judging by reaction from visitors to date is going down well with them.’
      • ‘This went down well with the school and with the teacher associations generally.’
      • ‘Right now, I could just go straight back to bed, but that would not go down too well with the boss (as reasonable as she is).’
      be successful, be a success, achieve success, triumph, make an impression, have an impact, get an enthusiastic reception
      be a hit, be a winner, be a sell-out, go down a storm, score
      View synonyms
    • 5Happen:

      ‘you really don't know what's going down?’
      • ‘You saw what went down in the courtroom today, her statement to the judge as well as her statement on the courthouse steps, apparently a vast difference.’
      • ‘That all went down just a few weeks ago - if we're lucky, Montreal audiences should get a taste of the posthumous collaboration at their upcoming show.’
      • ‘I worry about him everyday since I heard that something went down over at the Prison.’
      • ‘And that was essentially how it went down for forty-five minutes.’
      • ‘Why is it that every time something goes down the Americans immediately send people over to try to work things out?’
      • ‘If, on the other hand, you simply want to know what went down with a load of noisy gays over the weekend, you'll find the Mardi Gras coverage archived here.’
    • 6Leave a university, especially Oxford or Cambridge, after finishing one's studies.

      • ‘After he went down from Cambridge, RVW retained friendly links with this group.’
    • 7Be sent to prison.

  • go down on

    • Perform oral sex on.

  • go down with

    • Begin to suffer from (an illness):

      ‘I went down with an attack of bronchitis’
      • ‘Many other victims in southeast Asia went down with the virus after visiting markets where infected birds, live and freshly slaughtered, are for sale.’
      • ‘TB was also rife and I knew some nurses who went down with it.’
      • ‘Throughout most of my twenties I tended to go down with three or four colds every winter.’
      • ‘‘It was into the second week of the holiday when Chloe went down with a tummy upset,’ said Mrs Hampson.’
      • ‘Initially it was only a few who went down with the mysterious illness.’
      • ‘The Turners' nightmare began in May 1998 when Henry went down with what his parents initially believed was a tummy bug.’
      • ‘At some point, Pete's boat was finished, and K came to Cowes to launch her, but I went down with flu and couldn't be at the ceremony.’
      • ‘A dream wedding turned into a disaster after 24 guests went down with food poisoning, including the groom.’
      • ‘After finally recovering from that, he went down with glandular fever which kept him sidelined until the beginning of last season.’
      • ‘A week into the trip, however, Rob went down with stomach pains.’
      fall ill with, get, develop, contract, pick up, succumb to, fall victim to, be struck down with, become infected with
      take ill with
      take sick with
      View synonyms
  • go for

    • 1Decide on; choose:

      ‘I went for grilled halibut’
      • ‘I ordered my favourite flavour, mint chocolate chip while Adam went for chocolate fudge.’
      • ‘Downloads to mobile phones show a sharp division between the sexes with men going for games and women preferring ringtones.’
      • ‘My husband went for that old favourite, roast chicken with gravy and roast potatoes.’
      • ‘At the dairy case, choose lower-fat products while at the meat counter, go for lean or extra-lean beef and pork.’
      • ‘Today, for example, I've gone for my current favourite - oxtail ravioli.’
      • ‘Three to choose from - I went for the Zandra Rhodes creation.’
      • ‘When choosing margarine, go for the soft rather than the hard.’
      • ‘I decided to splurge and go for the whole shampoo, cut, blow dry, and permanent colour.’
      • ‘I felt much better, so I decided to go for a skirt, instead of my everyday jeans.’
      • ‘The younger generation prefers to buy coloured umbrellas while the older generation goes for black.’
      choose, pick, opt for, select, plump for, take, settle on, decide on
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Tend to find (a particular type of person) attractive:
        ‘Dionne went for the outlaw type’
        • ‘She's gone for rough boys in the past but maybe she's trying to change her image.’
        • ‘The only boys that ever went for her loved themselves and got another girl every week, just to kill the other girls' feelings.’
        • ‘I'm starting to realize why Cinderella went for the Prince.’
        • ‘She never really went for the sparkling golden boys, preferring the calmer, more measured, determined types.’
        be attracted to, find attractive, like, fancy
        View synonyms
    • 2Attempt to gain or attain:

      ‘he went for a job as a delivery driver’
      • ‘Tonight's final will see American favourite Brooke Bennett going for gold after clocking a heat time of 4.07.57, her fastest time in two years.’
      • ‘He said not to say I was separated if I went for a job.’
      • ‘‘Some landowners have decided to go for planning permission themselves,’ he said.’
      • ‘She went for gold with an attempt on 142.5kg but failed.’
      • ‘‘As a teacher, I was always a bit short of money so I went for a rep's job selling lighting because it came with a free car,’ explained David.’
      • ‘That would help the company raise revenues while complying with its market-share ceiling and going for more attractive high-margin corporate customers.’
      • ‘Suddenly, there were no more grades to be earned unless I did something insane like decide to go for another degree.’
      • ‘He never went for material gains nor sold his name for cheap publicity.’
      • ‘Don't laugh, I almost went for a job as a fireman once.’
      • ‘I was still going for customer service jobs, but they didn't seem to pay as much as I needed.’
      1. 2.1Strive to the utmost to gain or achieve something (frequently said as an exhortation):
        ‘sounds like a good idea—go for it!’
        • ‘Alderley Edge went for it in the final 15 minutes, but James Riley, City's keeper, had an outstanding game.’
        • ‘You shouldn't have to put up with bullying from your classmates. Go for it; don't let them stop you doing what you like.’
        • ‘And, you know, I just tackled it and went for it, and I've really never looked back.’
        • ‘She has really gone for it and it must have been so difficult for her at first in a place where no one spoke her language.’
        • ‘You like the girl! She's single! Go for it!’
        • ‘They wanted to score a try or two more and they went for it.’
        • ‘We knew that three points would put us into the quarter-finals and we went for it.’
        • ‘‘Had she been born in another era,’ Somerville told the Times, ‘she could have really gone for it and lived up to her potential.’’
        • ‘Well, we saw a niche in the market that wasn't filled and we went for it.’
        • ‘‘When we were sitting third, I think we should have taken the bull by the horns and gone for it,’ he said.’
    • 3Launch oneself at (someone); attack:

      ‘she went for him with clawed hands’
      • ‘Defenders Phil McGuire and Jamie McAllister had to be pulled apart when they went for one another after conceding the third goal.’
      • ‘Sheldon went for the fourth man and swung her leg at his stomach.’
      • ‘Realising his punches are having no effect he opts for an alternative form of attack… he goes for the legs.’
      • ‘It then bit her shoulder before going for her face, tearing the back of her left ear.’
      • ‘Clive only had time to put one foot on the road before his attacker went for his jugular.’
      • ‘He latched onto every part of my anatomy, finally going for my throat.’
      • ‘Bart cried out as Jack went for him, swinging his cutlass furiously.’
      • ‘I got a bit worried when two bulls and a cow came running towards me. I headed for the fence, ready to jump if they went for me, but they just stood there staring at me.’
      • ‘They also claimed the family's Rottweiler dog had attacked another dog, killed one woman's cat and gone for another woman in the street leaving her shaken up.’
      • ‘He went for her but she pulled out her silver cross and held it in front of herself.’
      attack, assault, hit, strike, give someone a beating, beat up, assail, launch oneself at, set upon, spring at, spring on, rush at, let fly at, tear into, lash out at
      View synonyms
    • 4Finally have a specified negative result:

      ‘my good intentions went for nothing’
      • ‘Civil service integrity and ministerial piety went for nothing.’
      • ‘I thought I could crack the top three, but when I heard that I placed fifth, I had tears in my eyes; it was as if all my hard work went for nothing.’
      • ‘Is all her eight or ten years of hard work to go for nothing?’
    • 5Apply to; have relevance for:

      ‘the same goes for money-grabbing lawyers’
      • ‘After such an event, you never see a pupil in quite the same light; the same goes for the pupils, for a common experience like this seems to break barriers in a remarkable way.’
      • ‘The same goes for my favourite dessert type pie, which would be the pecan pie my sister sent me the Christmas before last.’
      • ‘The same goes for light switches, plug sockets, razor points and extractor fans.’
      • ‘Of course plenty of gay men are inclined to be reliably pro-war, and the same goes for lots of ‘feminists.’’
      • ‘What goes for one does not necessarily apply to all.’
      • ‘The same goes for her attempts to get them to help her with fundraising ideas.’
      • ‘And it doesn't just apply to those on the Council - that same goes for the guards, the servants, the lesser nobility, the townsfolk, everyone.’
      • ‘Kids raised in a kibbutz, for example, very rarely marry each other, and that goes for the people who bring them up as well.’
      • ‘Concentrate the stuff near the roots, not the ends (this goes for ANY product you choose though).’
      • ‘The same goes for idiots who decide to chat through the film.’
  • go forward

    • (of a clock) be set to a later standard time, especially summertime.

      • ‘Now the clocks have gone forward, we must move forward with them.’
      • ‘The clocks have gone forward, the evenings have got lighter and finally summer is on its way.’
      • ‘As you should have noticed the clocks went forward an hour over the weekend and here is a theory to find out if you are getting on in years.’
      • ‘I must have been walking around with my head buried in the sand because I had no idea that the clocks went forward an hour last night.’
      • ‘Last time we were in London we travelled down on the day the clocks went forward, losing an hour's sleep then travelling down on a scorching hot day.’
      • ‘Operation Enforce was devised after increased numbers of teenagers were seen drinking on the streets at night since the clocks went forward.’
      • ‘He added there could be a discrepancy in the time the attack was reported because the clocks went forward an hour that night.’
      • ‘The clocks had gone forward that week, which meant she had to cover a very short distance in the dark to catch the bus to San Miguel, a few miles away.’
      • ‘Well, we're two hours ahead, now that the clocks have gone forward.’
      • ‘You lost sixty minutes from your life this morning when the clocks went forward.’
  • go in for

    • 1Enter (a competition) or sit (an examination):

      ‘he went in for the exam’
      • ‘Well if you recall he was going in for a competition at Donnington for the loudest sound system.’
      • ‘Fred and J.R. went in for the Knobbly Knees competition but neither of them won.’
      • ‘It's funny - when I went in for what I term ‘the swimsuit competition,’ he said I was the first to be scheduled.’
      • ‘I did a bit of diving but I never went in for any major competitions.’
      • ‘He's solid, he's reliable and you know he's going to give it everything in every single challenge he goes in for.’
      • ‘He went in for the competition last year and he was hoping to win it this time.’
      go in for, put one's name down for, register for, enrol for, sign on for, sign up for, become a competitor in, become a contestant in, gain entrance to, obtain entrance to
      View synonyms
    • 2Like or habitually take part in (an activity):

      ‘I don't go in for the social whirl’
      • ‘They don't romanticize the instrument's folk origins or go in for New Age contrivances.’
      • ‘Even when I was single, I never went in for that playing-with-fire kind of dallying - not that I was a prude.’
      • ‘I think modern young couples are still looking for the old fashioned stability and public commitment my generation went in for.’
      • ‘Apparently this show is a departure from the stronger stuff Taki Rua usually goes in for but stick with it I say.’
      • ‘At 17, Olga had the world standing up and applauding, daring and innovative, she at times went in for near suicidal routines.’
      • ‘I'm not one to go in for a lot of political correctness, so if the depiction of the Spanish-Californian peasants bothered me even a little bit, it is bound to offend others to a far greater degree.’
      • ‘And at least the singer didn't try to do all that guttural bellowing into the mic stuff that the other bands went in for.’
      • ‘He doesn't go in for the trappings of stardom, preferring a quiet family life.’
      • ‘Although they very much enjoy sex with the right partner, they are quite undemanding and don't go in for party tricks.’
      • ‘And maybe the assertiveness training and confidence-building exercises we women have been going in for down the years is just as much of a waste of time.’
      take part in, participate in, be a participant in, engage in, get involved in, join in, enter into, occupy oneself with, play a part in, be a party to, undertake
      practise, pursue
      take up, espouse, adopt, embrace
      View synonyms
  • go into

    • 1Investigate or enquire into (something):

      ‘there's no need to go into it now’
      • ‘But the judge was well aware of this point and these issues, as is demonstrated by the lengthy investigation that she went into with Mr Wallis and Mr Jarrold.’
      • ‘To understand why India enjoys such impunity, we need to go into the history of the commission set up in 1946.’
      investigate, examine, enquire into, look into, research, study, probe, explore, delve into, try to get to the bottom of
      discuss, consider, review, analyse, weigh up
      View synonyms
    • 2(of a whole number) be capable of dividing another, typically without a remainder:

      ‘six into five won't go’
  • go off

    • 1(of a gun, bomb, or similar device) explode or fire:

      ‘the pistol suddenly went off’
      • ‘Once the first bomb goes off, forces must always look for the potential secondary or tertiary attack.’
      • ‘The gun went off and there was a bright flash of light, but it seemed like I was the only one who had seen it.’
      • ‘Since the officers opened the windows a few minutes after the smoke bomb went off, I don't expect to find much residue upstairs.’
      • ‘When the first atomic bomb went off as some scientists had predicted it would, another bit of truth about the empirical world was revealed.’
      • ‘It was believed that on three of the devices the detonators went off but the bomb failed to explode.’
      • ‘As more American forces came to the scene, another bomb went off, setting fire to a second vehicle, he said.’
      • ‘Time seemed to stand still, but suddenly the bomb went off.’
      • ‘A car bomb exploded outside a police academy yesterday, and when police set up a checkpoint to close the area, a second car bomb went off, authorities said.’
      • ‘Neighbours say they were convinced a bomb had gone off when the firework exploded with a massive bang earlier this week in Harington Avenue, off Melrosegate.’
      • ‘An improvised explosive device, a pipe bomb, went off and yes, it has, I suppose, marred the reputation of the 1996 Olympics.’
      explode, detonate, blow up, burst, erupt
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1(of an alarm) begin to sound.
        • ‘A high-pitched smoke alarm went off, and water sprinklers began showering the entire kitchen.’
        • ‘From the time my alarm clock goes off, I am beginning my workout.’
        • ‘The alarm clock went off and Nicole slammed her hand on top of it.’
        • ‘Already the air was filled with the blaring sounds of alarms going off, and a few armed guards ran off towards us as we broke out of the door.’
        • ‘Why doesn't a little mental alarm go off and make you think: that doesn't sound right, could that be true?’
        • ‘He remembers how as a 12-year-old boy, he would run to the bunkers every time the siren went off and bombs exploded next to his house.’
        • ‘The postman always rings twice, always rings too loud, always rings ten minutes before your alarm's due to go off, and always rings and runs away before you get to the door.’
        • ‘Well, I woke up well before the alarm went off at 6am this morning.’
        • ‘I hadn't even smelled the smoke when the alarm went off.’
        • ‘On six occasions in the past year he has woken to the sound of breaking glass and the alarm going off.’
    • 2(of food or drink) begin to decompose and become inedible:

      ‘milk went off so quickly in hot weather’
      • ‘All this to stop milk going off for a while longer?’
      • ‘Your fridge is no longer a place to pop the milk to stop it going off - it's an expression of who you are and where you want to be in life.’
      • ‘An upcoming prospect is that soon your household appliances will be linked up to the internet and can share information so that your fridge will tell you when the milk has gone off.’
      • ‘Anti-cancer broccoli was proposed, as was packaging containing a microchip which alerts you when food is going off.’
      • ‘It's like sniffing sour milk to see if it's gone off: you just have to keep going back to make sure.’
      • ‘Furthermore, a recent research report suggested that Briton needlessly waste money on food that goes off before it can be consumed.’
      • ‘This allows us to buy what we need, meaning there is likely to be little waste, and fresh food does not go off before it's used.’
      • ‘Milk goes off more rapidly and can harbour pathogenic (food poisoning) bacteria.’
      • ‘Tesco delivers to the house each week, though sometimes the food goes off before we have a night in to eat it.’
      • ‘The food goes off and Italian temperaments get extremely frazzled turning hotel rooms into makeshift kitchens.’
      go bad, go stale, go sour, turn, spoil, go rancid
      View synonyms
    • 3Begin to dislike:

      ‘I went off men after my husband left me’
      • ‘And do not fret if Stonewall goes off his food, off to the farthest reaches of the house to sulk, or off to neighbor's back door for a day or two.’
      • ‘Any change of routine may cause your cat to go off its food.’
      • ‘I may have a small steak tartare, but I've gone off food terribly.’
      • ‘After a while, if you listen to your body, you will find that you are not able to drink as much alcohol, you are losing your appetite and going off your food and you get tired easily.’
      • ‘Some develop a measles-like rash and go off their food.’
      • ‘I used to be a major Izzard fan, but in the last couple of years I've gone off him big time.’
      • ‘Even if he had a hard race and he was beaten, where other horses would fade away and maybe go off their grub, he would actually thrive on it.’
      • ‘At 10 am he felt a bit more shivery and was going off his food.’
      • ‘Statistics show we've gone off our British food.’
      • ‘I've gone off hot chocolate; maybe it's the advent of spring that has dulled my obsession.’
    • 4Go to sleep.

      • ‘But we will soon be together again and knowing that I just went off to sleep…’
      • ‘But we went off to sleep again as the American warships moved away.’
      • ‘Madi created a fire, which nobody had yet done, and everyone went off to sleep except for the ‘watchers’.’
      • ‘Once the toddler went off to sleep, the TV and the lights went off too, so it was an early bed for all of us.’
      • ‘I was standing next to the patient during induction, held his hand, and he went off to sleep.’
      • ‘Be aware he may cry for a few minutes before going off to sleep.’
      • ‘Taylor silently made the sign of the cross and went off to sleep.’
      • ‘He decides to put the jukebox away and go off to sleep.’
      • ‘He let Rich go off to an uneasy sleep and hung up the phone.’
      • ‘She felt the girl's grip loosen as she went off to sleep.’
    • 5Gradually cease to be felt:

      ‘I had a bad headache but it's going off now’
  • go on

    • 1[often with present participle]Continue or persevere:

      ‘I can't go on protecting you’
      • ‘She will do so as she goes on with her work protecting Americans' private security.’
      • ‘Later that night, the Anglers Rest Hotel in Headford was the venue for the gala dinner and music and dancing went on late into the night.’
      • ‘The tune went on and on, and the frenzied dancing continued.’
      • ‘A great night was had by all with excellent food an good music from Double L and the dancing went on till late.’
      • ‘I can't go on deceiving myself anymore.’
      • ‘After the prize-giving, the festivities begin again and the dancing goes on well into the next morning until hangovers, prudence and normal life kick in.’
      • ‘During his extended stay he was invited to join a magical ceremony, where the music and dancing went on all night.’
      • ‘The celebrations with music and dancing went on into the late hours.’
      • ‘But the debate goes on, appeals continue and the outcome remains in doubt.’
      • ‘Dancing went on till the early hours in the lower ground floor of the store, which had been turned into a night club-type space especially for the evening.’
      1. 1.1Talk at great length, especially tediously or angrily:
        ‘the twins were always going on about him’
        • ‘So, for those people who don't really know what the hell I'm going on about - my family has just moved from Cornwall to London, the city of my birth.’
        • ‘Anyhow, most of you probably have no idea who or what I'm going on about.’
        • ‘All of a sudden, he started going on about the past.’
        • ‘Mum started going on about retiring in 3 years.’
        • ‘And George went on about losing his family member and losing this precious addition to his life.’
        • ‘They went on about benefits, making ends meet and why New Labour is so out of touch with the plight of those on the dole as I nodded surreptitiously into my pint, earwigging all the while.’
        • ‘A few years back I found myself at a press launch where the man himself went on about how he was a proper journalist, yet the others were all pretenders, and not worthy to lick his boots.’
        • ‘I could go on at length about the other prizes on offer, but I won't.’
        • ‘Brian is still going on about how two male MPs were photographed kissing in parliament, and this was published in the newspaper.’
        • ‘She went on about all her old records and how she should sell them.’
        last, continue, carry on, run on, proceed
        talk at length, ramble, rattle on, talk on and on, carry on talking, chatter, prattle, prate, gabble, maunder, blether, blather, twitter
        View synonyms
      2. 1.2Continue speaking or doing something after a short pause:
        [with direct speech] ‘‘I don't understand,’ she went on’
        • ‘‘Potential members now have a choice, so we all have to compete to stay in front,’ he went on to say.’
        • ‘She said each word deliberately and paused slightly before going on to the next word.’
        • ‘She then went on to outline the activities carried out over the past year.’
        • ‘After a pause, Marlow goes on to tell his shipmates about his experience as a freshwater sailor.’
        • ‘There was another pause, and she went on just before he would have answered.’
        • ‘‘But now that you mention it,’ she went on, ‘I really feel that you should think about changing your mind.’’
        • ‘After a section with tips and techniques, which is kept nice and short, Christine goes on to share over seventy of her recipes.’
        • ‘He bent to adjust the stirrups and went on speaking.’
        • ‘But they went on to admit most of their research was carried out on people who were fit enough to work and were working at the time.’
        • ‘The priest went on to say none of these villagers could read or write and everything told to them had to be very simple and straighforward so they got the message.’
      3. 1.3informal Said when encouraging someone or expressing disbelief:
        ‘go on, tell him!’
        • ‘Go on! Tell me! What's wrong?’
        • ‘Buy it. Go on. I'm telling you, buy it.’
        • ‘So please keep your comments coming, and if you've never said anything before, why not take the opportunity now? Go on, I dare you!’
    • 2Happen:

      ‘we still don't know what went on there’
      • ‘You know, who cares about whatever else went on behind the scenes?’
      • ‘There wasn't any wild dancing going on or anything.’
      • ‘Hence the Golden Jubilee Web site that will tell you what's going on where and gently encourage you to celebrate as well.’
      • ‘While the building work was going on my wife and I lived in a flat in No 10 Lower Mount Street.’
      • ‘A security guard eventually noticed what was going on and called the police.’
      • ‘We are not going to make any progress on this until we get some truth and transparency about what's going on.’
      • ‘The majority of people here genuinely care about what goes on in their community as well as the people in it.’
      • ‘I just didn't care what was going on around me - I was in my own little world.’
      • ‘‘While all this was going on my workers fled,’ said Pascall.’
      • ‘Children's librarian Lucy Kitchener said: ‘We wanted to let the children know what is going on in their area.’’
      happen, take place, occur, transpire
      View synonyms
    • 3[often with infinitive]Proceed to do:

      ‘she went on to do postgraduate work’
      • ‘If the town council takes the market over there is a good chance it will go on to be a success.’
      • ‘When I eventually did go on to have a family of my own, I realised that the sickness was, in fact, the sign of a stable pregnancy.’
      • ‘It used to be that rectors or anyone associated with a seminary would have a good chance of going on to be a bishop.’
      • ‘If you can cope with that then you've got a good chance of going on to win the game.’
      • ‘The second half saw the away team increase their supremacy and they went on to win by six points.’
      • ‘Those that persevere and succeed can go on to command six figure salaries.’
      • ‘He encourages them to study and hopes that they will go on to higher education.’
      • ‘They eventually go on to have the baby, and two more children, but years later, deep in the throes of her addiction, Isa does the unthinkable.’
      • ‘In the program, the students spend the first four semesters at UI and go on to continue their remaining four semesters at a university abroad.’
      • ‘And to be honest what were the chances of Mary going on to be a movie star?’
    • 4[usually with negative]Have a specified amount of care or liking for (something):

      ‘I heard this album last month and didn't go much on it’
      • ‘Like the biblical inhabitants of Eden, he and Jim do not ‘go much on clothes.’’
      • ‘I was approached by the Cowboys in 2002 and was keen to get out of Sydney at the time. I don't go much on the lifestyle down there.’
  • go out

    • 1(of a fire or light) be extinguished:

      ‘a few minutes later the lights went out’
      • ‘Suddenly, all of the lights went out, it was pitch dark, and I couldn't even see anything.’
      • ‘He had been in a meeting when the building shook, there was an explosion, half the lights went out and the air conditioning stopped working.’
      • ‘Then at 5.10 pm, and just as the valiant efforts of the groundstaff had started to make the pitch look playable, the lights went out.’
      • ‘Then all the lights went out and the building was blacked out.’
      • ‘Tal saw the light from the fire go out, and decided that it would be wise to return to his own hut.’
      • ‘The outage caused a minor accident on Main Street late on Tuesday morning after two vehicles collided at Lumber Avenue when the traffic lights went out.’
      • ‘When the audience had settled, the auditorium lights went out.’
      • ‘‘There was a loud thump, then the lights went out and everybody started screaming,’ she said.’
      • ‘The lights went out on about a thousand customers this morning, including City Hall.’
      • ‘I think the street lights went out too - it was pitch black.’
      be turned off, be extinguished
      View synonyms
    • 2(of the tide) ebb.

      • ‘Within an hour and a half the tide had gone out again and the clean-up operation began in earnest.’
      • ‘The thing is, we didn't realise that the tide went out so far.’
      • ‘We try going along south along Shore Road, having decided the tide was going out, but it appears to be coming back in, and is blocking the road ahead.’
      • ‘Water subsided in some areas as the tide went out but the diversion signs were back up again at high tide on Thursday morning and Thursday evening.’
      • ‘Six hours after they were stranded, the tide went out and the couple walked to safety.’
      • ‘Hundreds bathed, and the tide went out so far that the harbour at low water was empty.’
      • ‘Sharon, who has been teaching English in Thailand for three years, was on the beach near her hotel when she noticed the tide had suddenly gone out.’
      • ‘As the tide went out yesterday, cavalcades of cars and transit vans poured into the area, with a Spanish lorry parked at Bardsea and a ship on standby in the bay waiting to be loaded.’
      • ‘Otherwise they would have suffered another two and a half hour wait before the tide went out again, by which time it would have been dark.’
      • ‘He says he and a friend were just about to go snorkeling when they noticed the tide had gone out much farther than usual.’
      recede, go out, retreat, flow back, draw back, fall back, fall away, abate, subside
      View synonyms
    • 3Leave one's home to go to a social event:

      ‘I'm going out for dinner’
      • ‘Milen Muskov is an engineer who graduated in journalism and describes himself as a modern young man interested in films, football and going out with friends.’
      • ‘Poor levels of lighting had been making elderly residents reluctant to go out at night to events in the Butler Community Centre or even to the local shops.’
      • ‘Justin and I went out to dinner last night, to our favorite restaurant.’
      • ‘Stuffing her cell phone into her purse she darted down the stairs and out the door before her mother could ask her why she was going out at nine on a school night.’
      • ‘This afternoon we did something we've never done before: we went out for Thanksgiving dinner, with my parents.’
      • ‘I wasn't a very social person, nor did I enjoy social events or going out on the town.’
      • ‘My job is quite social, and everybody goes out after work.’
      • ‘We don't wear our uniforms (they're only for ceremonial events) when we go out incognito.’
      • ‘We went out to dinner one night, but the cuisine didn't agree with me.’
      • ‘The 18 year-old said he didn't know as yet what he wanted to do after school, but there was one thing for certain he was going out with his friends to celebrate his results.’
    • 4Carry on a regular romantic or sexual relationship:

      ‘he was going out with her best friend’
      • ‘I'm going out with this guy, but he rarely calls.’
      • ‘I had had a bad relationship a year prior to going out with him and things were good between us, we seemed to click (well, at least I thought we did).’
      • ‘The girl I'm going out with now I've known for a little over three years but I never really talked to her until this summer during a backpacking trip in Lake Tahoe.’
      • ‘They had been going out for about eighteen months and were about to move in together.’
      • ‘Arran, who works in the building trade has been going out with Laura for the past 11 years, and the happy couple will honeymoon in St. Lucia, Barbados.’
      • ‘Actually, he's going out with someone else now.’
      • ‘I was going out with this guy for two years and all that time he had been seeing another girl.’
      • ‘My boyfriend and I have been going out for nine months.’
      • ‘He was going out with this girl who was an artist.’
      • ‘I have been going out with him since September 26th 2000.’
      see, take out, be someone's boyfriend, be someone's girlfriend, be romantically involved with, go around with, keep company
      View synonyms
    • 5Used to convey someone's deep sympathy or similar feeling:

      ‘her heart went out to the pitiful figure’
      • ‘‘We have expressed our sympathies to the family involved and our heart goes out to them at this very sad time,’ he said.’
      • ‘And I often meet with the parents of soldiers who were killed in action, and my heartfelt sympathy goes out to all of them.’
      • ‘As Sam drove, he listened to Jimmy, and his heart went out to the boy.’
      • ‘Our thoughts and deepest sympathies go out to his family and fiends.’
      • ‘Our sympathy and prayers go out to them all on this anniversary of Kieran's death.’
      • ‘Rolf's heart went out to the little boy and he reached out and touched his cheek.’
      • ‘My heartfelt sympathies go out to the family, but also to the driver of the vehicle.’
      • ‘He will be missed dearly, and our thoughts, prayers and deepest condolences go out to his wonderful family.’
      • ‘My heartfelt sympathy goes out to all the families who have lost sons and husbands, fathers, brothers.’
      • ‘Our deepest sympathies go out to the victims and the families of all those involved.’
    • 6Golf
      Play the first nine holes in a round of eighteen holes:

      ‘McAllister went out in 43’
      Compare with come home (see home)
      • ‘Faldo, playing with Ian Poulter, one of the next generation of English young guns, got off to a great start with birdies at the second and fourth holes to go out in 34.’
      • ‘When I bogeyed those three holes going out, I was a bit concerned but I held it together after that.’
    • 7(in some card games) be the first to dispose of all the cards in one's hand.

      • ‘As a further development of the above ideas, some players do not allow a player to go out by discarding a card that could have been melded.’
      • ‘When a player goes out, by disposing of all their cards, the other players score penalty points for all the cards remaining in their hands.’
      • ‘To go out you meld all of your cards, or all except one, which you discard.’
      • ‘Getting rid of your last card is called going out.’
      • ‘The play ends when a player goes out, i.e. disposes of all the cards in hand.’
      • ‘In these games, you do not necessarily have to form all your cards into sets to go out.’
      • ‘You go out by melding all your cards except one, and discarding the last card.’
      • ‘If a player is going out (no cards left), discard is not necessary.’
      • ‘Players score for cards melded according to the point values printed on the cards, and are penalised for unmelded cards when another player goes out.’
      • ‘When only a few cards are left in the stock and it is your turn to go perhaps overdraw from it to get the cards you need to go out if you may manage it.’
  • go over

    • 1Consider, examine, or check (something):

      ‘I want to go over these plans with you again’
      • ‘I haven't gone over the speech and checked the accuracy of all of the statements, but it is simply untrue that he appeared crazy in some way.’
      • ‘Mr. Parker, who was going over the game plan with some of the players, looked up and shook his head.’
      • ‘I go over the figures, checking and double-checking, just in case I may have got them wrong.’
      • ‘Check for spellings, go over your analysis in your own minds just to ensure that you have not made a monumentally large mistake.’
      • ‘It was then that he began considering his options, going over possible emergency landing sites in his mind.’
      • ‘Trent took a moment to ponder this question and, from where Ally was sitting, it looked like he was going over a check list in his mind.’
      • ‘I've gone over your file and checked the test results.’
      • ‘As I have analysed this and gone over the incidents a few times in my mind, right now I am having a few doubts to say the least about my reading of the situation.’
      • ‘Kirby opened a large black logbook and together they began to go over her budget plans and problems.’
      • ‘Don and I spent a lot of time talking about this and going over the plans leading up to surgery as well as the week after surgery.’
      examine, study, scrutinize, inspect, read over, look at, look over, scan, run over, check
      rehearse, practise, read through, run through
      View synonyms
    • 2Change one's allegiance or religion:

      ‘he went over to the pro-English party’
      • ‘You have a whole pack of these guys, who left the Dixiecrat Party, a part of the Democratic Party, went over to the Republican Party.’
      • ‘Several prominent members broke with the organisation as a result, and went over to join the Socialist Party.’
      • ‘I went over to Gmail this summer and love the ability to search all my messages.’
    • 3Be received in a specified way:

      ‘his earnestness would go over well in a courtroom’
      • ‘Although I had nothing to do with the planning or execution of this event, I thought it went over pretty well, considering.’
      • ‘They did not go over well, receiving polite applause at best.’
      • ‘Of course, this sort of talk doesn't go over well with the members of the opposite sex.’
  • go round (chiefly us also go around)

    • 1Spin; revolve:

      ‘the wheels were going round’
      • ‘The hybrid combines a V6 petrol engine with front and rear electric motors to help the wheels go round.’
      • ‘The wheel went round and round and suddenly Stella was thrown out and landed in a heap at her Syd's feet.’
      • ‘It's quite tiring just watching all of his different wheels go round.’
      • ‘Because in the silence I could hear the mind's wheels going round and I could see that my friend was a little shocked at the implication of what he'd said.’
      • ‘We know the Earth is spinning because we see the stars go round.’
      • ‘Lucky for me, the wheels on the bus stopped going round and round and kids started pouring out.’
      • ‘And in the evenings, in the mango trees, the Kuyils sang songs like squeaky wheels going round and round out of sync.’
      spin, revolve, turn, rotate, whirl
      View synonyms
    • 2(especially of food) be sufficient to supply everybody present:

      ‘there was barely enough food to go round’
      • ‘One of the problems in Edinburgh is that, with so many burlesque shows, there are simply not enough good artists to go round.’
      • ‘As long as the good times had lasted this did not matter too much; there was work and money enough to go round.’
      • ‘The majority, here, now depend on food from outside, but there isn't enough to go round.’
      • ‘Without a substantial increase in the country's output, there just won't be enough jobs to go round.’
      • ‘The reason simply being that there is not enough cash to go round.’
      • ‘The vicar had to ask that we share the hymn books, because as they were not used to such large numbers attending, there were not enough to go round.’
      • ‘All these new spas popping up everywhere make me wonder how there can possibly be enough trained therapists to go round.’
      • ‘The trouble with this new level of competition is that there wasn't really enough talent to go round.’
      • ‘They have to share running spikes because there aren't enough pairs to go round.’
      • ‘The problem is that there are not enough resources to go round.’
  • go through

    • 1Undergo (a difficult period or experience):

      ‘the country is going through a period of economic instability’
      • ‘Harry spent Monday to Thursday going through a series of rigorous assessments alongside 31 other candidates.’
      • ‘Pubs that miss the deadline, which is less than six weeks away, will be forced to spend months going through an even longer application process.’
      • ‘After World War II Berlin was divided into separate parts and Shanghai, although restored to China, went through a period of stagnation.’
      • ‘Like most AIDS victims, he went through periods of depression, anger and self-pity.’
      • ‘One of my former West Brom team-mates, Andy Hunt, went through something similar to Matt shortly after he moved to Charlton.’
      • ‘We don't want anybody to go through what Matthew has to go through and this money could be used to find a cure or a treatment.’
      • ‘She never even went through a sullen teenage period.’
      • ‘Instead of having to go through medical examinations and being seen by a confusing variety of different people, they get their own one-to-one nurse.’
      • ‘They are going through a transitional period but the kids are gaining invaluable experience.’
      • ‘The firms exhibiting at the Money Show must go through a vetting process and one withdrew last year when questioned on his business practices by the organisers.’
      undergo, experience, face, suffer, be subjected to, live through, endure, brave, bear, tolerate, stand, withstand, put up with, brook, cope with, weather, come in for, receive, sustain
      View synonyms
    • 2Search through or examine methodically:

      ‘she started to go through the bundle of letters’
      • ‘He then went through James's pockets for his phone and the keys of the car and started running up the field trying to dial 999.’
      • ‘Newsweek notes that before the controversy erupted over the program two teams of lawyers had gone through and approved its script.’
      • ‘During major inquiries many police hours can be spent going through CCTV tapes and its hoped the system with save a great deal of time.’
      • ‘As he started the car and headed along the service road back to the main highway, she was going through each CD, examining the covers.’
      • ‘Lily went through her purse in search of the keys to her apartment.’
      • ‘Out the window he could see unemployed men going through garbage cans to search for food.’
      • ‘In a 747, the pilot spends a half-hour going through a checklist, before even pulling the plane onto the runway.’
      • ‘Mark walked into the bedroom and started going through their things, searching for a shirt he could put on.’
      • ‘I spent some time today going through some boxes in the junk room and picking out things to haul to the dump.’
      • ‘He was then knocked to the floor where he was held down while the gang went through his pockets.’
      search, look through, hunt through, rummage in, rummage through, rifle through, dig into, ferret, ferret about in, ferret around in, root about in, root around in, turn inside out
      examine, study, scrutinize, inspect, read over, look at, look over, scan, run over, check
      View synonyms
    • 3(of a proposal or contract) be officially approved or completed:

      ‘the sale of the building is set to go through’
      • ‘If the proposed boundary changes go through, Parteen and several other Clare suburbs of Limerick City will be drawn inside the city boundaries.’
      • ‘Although the proposal is expected to go through, some branch secretaries are known to be strongly opposed.’
      • ‘The transfer of Scarborough striker Chris Tate to York City's Division Three rivals Leyton Orient finally went through after a contractual hitch was overcome.’
      • ‘If AOL's techies have their way, the contract will go through without further delay.’
      • ‘One potential side-effect is that many, many, many people will be disenfranchised if this proposal goes through.’
      • ‘If this proposal goes through, clubs will be able to fine players four weeks' wages, double the current maximum.’
      • ‘If objections are not raised there is every chance that these proposals will go through.’
      • ‘If the deal proposed by the employers goes through, Lorimer, a part-time employee, said she'll have her benefits significantly cut.’
      • ‘Council tax payers in York can add nearly six per cent to their monthly payments from today after City of York Council's proposed rise went through unchallenged.’
      • ‘Mrs Cooper was concerned about the effect in terms of staff and morale if these proposals went through.’
      be completed, be concluded, be brought to a conclusion, be carried through, be brought off, be pulled off
      View synonyms
    • 4Use up or spend (available money or other resources).

      • ‘But if people are willing to vote for politicians who go through their money like there's no tomorrow, they should take the consequences of that decision and vote more sensibly next time.’
      • ‘Charlie had spent the entire morning shopping, and had already gone through the money Adam had given her.’
      • ‘We could probably go through that money in a couple months so that's why we are being really careful about how it's being used.’
      • ‘Tara was amazed by the amount of money she was going through.’
      • ‘Many children these days go through enough money to support a family 20 years ago, but still have little fun compared with our childhood.’
      spend, use up, run through, get through, expend, consume, exhaust, deplete
      View synonyms
    • 5(of a book) be successively published in (a specified number of editions):

      ‘within two years it went through thirty-one editions’
      • ‘The first two books went through over ten editions and were clearly the dominant texts in the field for much of the first half of the century.’
      • ‘The book went through four editions in seven months, and was into its tenth edition by 1853.’
      • ‘First published in 1852, it had gone through nine editions by 1906.’
      • ‘Nevertheless Nathan's book went through many editions and in many languages.’
      • ‘His book quickly became popular in the United States and went through several editions.’
      • ‘The precursor of books to follow for the next 200 years, he published it in four volumes in 1694 and it later went through at least ten editions.’
      • ‘His book on ecological genetics went through several editions and his monographs on moths and butterflies are still used.’
      • ‘The work was extremely successful, and went through many editions.’
      • ‘The book went through seven editions, the last in 1913, and was enormously popular.’
      • ‘The book was first published in 1883 but went through many editions.’
    • 6Leave hastily to avoid an obligation; abscond.

      • ‘The first few times she went through on him nearly broke his heart.’
  • go through with

    • Perform (an action) to completion despite difficulty or unwillingness:

      ‘he bravely went through with the ceremony’
      • ‘The company is also going through with previously announced production cuts at Saturn plants in Wilmington, Delaware and Spring Hill, Tennessee.’
      • ‘She was still unable to believe that they were actually going through with what they had threatened.’
      • ‘The cops threatened to bust everyone for indecent exposure if they went through with the performance, but failed to show up when the ‘exhibit’ actually took place.’
      • ‘I was going to marry him so I'm glad I found out about it before I went through with it.’
      • ‘I can't believe I actually went through with that.’
      • ‘Friends were genuinely surprised when he went through with the challenge, and now those who sponsored him are having to pay up.’
      • ‘By sheer bloody-mindedness we went through with the law suits, despite threats from the investor, and were recently told we had won our case in the supreme court.’
      • ‘Contrary to some of the advice we were given, we went through with our wedding anyway.’
      • ‘After much consideration and in a complete daze, I went through with the termination feeling all at once ashamed, relieved and scared that I would have ruined my chances of ever having kids.’
      • ‘He realised that it was the wrong decision, but he went through with it anyway.’
  • go to!

    • Said to express disbelief, impatience, or admonition.

      • ‘‘Go to, son,’ rejoined the friar, ‘what is this thou sayest?’’
  • go under

    • 1(of a business) become bankrupt.

      • ‘His dad couldn't get any money out of the country and the business went under.’
      • ‘Some of these businesses might even go under as a result of failing to cope with a sudden downturn in revenues.’
      • ‘A lot of businesses go under in the first year and we want to help them stay in business.’
      • ‘Mrs Cooper admits that, if she had not got her own source of funding, she could have gone under three times in the early years of the business.’
      • ‘A worried businessman fears his three York companies could go under if a residential parking permit scheme goes ahead.’
      • ‘In the past year, nearly 14,000 family-owned small businesses have gone under.’
      • ‘If, however, they are willing to admit that the new charges were a ghastly mistake, they should take action quickly before businesses start to go under and some community groups are lost for good.’
      • ‘If the bank had gone under, it would have been the biggest financial-sector bankruptcy in Germany's history, according to Business Week magazine.’
      • ‘The only problem is as these corporations get bigger then even more smaller businesses go under, unable to compete with lower prices and special offers.’
      • ‘Businesses have gone under, and there has also been an impact on jobs.’
      go bankrupt, cease trading, go into receivership, go into liquidation, become insolvent, be liquidated, be wound up
      fail
      go broke, go to the wall, go belly up, fold, flatline
      View synonyms
    • 2(of a person) die or suffer an emotional collapse.

      • ‘I would think it was a very tearful and desperate time for him and I think this has probably been the closest he has come to going under.’
  • go up

    • 1(of a building or other structure) be built:

      ‘housing developments went up’
      • ‘Blockades have gone up around the World Bank and IMF buildings.’
      • ‘Aside from the Norwich Union building, almost every high post-war building that has gone up in York has been a disaster, he points out.’
      • ‘If the new building goes up by September 2004, as the college wishes, it will increase the number of pupils from 700 to 765.’
      • ‘The squatters were evicted a week later but a tent city that went up around the building persists.’
      • ‘New apartments are going to be built on the north campus as well as two townhouse structures now currently going up next to the gym.’
      • ‘Everything is new and the buildings are still going up.’
      • ‘With new buildings going up all the time, and old ones coming tumbling down, the town is never the same one year to the next.’
      • ‘The college's plan would see three new buildings go up as part of its expansion in York, as it prepares to shut its Ripon campus in the summer.’
      • ‘In contrast, say, to the Museum of Scotland, the new parliament building is going up as fast as a block of jerry-built flats.’
      • ‘Scaffolding is set to go up later this month to enable experts to examine the structure and detail the work needed.’
    • 2Explode or suddenly burst into flames:

      ‘two factories went up in flames’
      • ‘Then all of a sudden I just saw all of the downstairs go up in flames, and all the windows smashed.’
      • ‘If, heaven forbid, his home and studio were to go up in flames, after his beloved wife what would he save?’
      • ‘Two quick-thinking councillors saved an elderly people's home from going up in flames after yobs set it alight.’
      • ‘It went up in a burst of flame, and only a smoking shell remained when the flames faded.’
      • ‘Arson attacks continued after sunset, with a nursery school going up in flames in Toulouse.’
      • ‘A fire wall just beyond the clock tower in the centre of the building saved the east wing from going up in flames.’
      • ‘Any who were slow to gather their goods could find the roof going up in flames; nothing was to be left that might permit continued human habitation.’
      • ‘‘Everything I owned in the world was going up in flames and I was crying,’ she said.’
      • ‘In Edinburgh, the council is already preparing for the worst and has contacted Lothian and Borders police in order to prevent the city going up in flames.’
      • ‘Luckily the fuel tank was almost empty, saving their home from going up in flames.’
    • 3Begin one's studies at a university, especially Oxford or Cambridge.

      • ‘The charity Family Matters York is offering a two-hour budgeting course free for students going up to university this autumn.’
      • ‘From the time he went up to Cambridge to the end of his life his system of order was strictly maintained.’
      • ‘Lightfoot preached his sermon on women in the same summer Maggie Benson went up to Oxford.’
      • ‘Born in Oxford she was privately educated before going up to Newnham College, Cambridge, and later Oxford University.’
      • ‘But then young Master Thomas had gone up to Cambridge, and Elsie's black mood had descended.’
      • ‘They continued to correspond on plant matters after going up to university - Fox Talbot to Cambridge and Trevelyan to Oxford.’
      • ‘In the 1980s, Coutts was the bank with whom Sloane Rangers opened an account before going up to Oxford or Cambridge.’
      • ‘Big Mike was a clever lad, and went up to Cambridge at the age of 17.’
      • ‘Well I think really it began to falter when I went up to Oxford University to study chemistry.’
      • ‘I obtained my first cards when I went up to university, then proceeded to spend on them recklessly.’
  • go with

    • 1Give one's consent or agreement to (a person or proposal).

      • ‘Of course, the likelihood of success is vastly amplified if a partner goes with it.’
      • ‘I've had two weeks to decide whether or not to go with the mastectomy, but in the end the decision was easy’
      • ‘If it is allowed to go to the public, and if they decide to go with it, well and good.’
      • ‘The choice to go with the proposal seemed risky, so the NSNU board approved the first ad.’
      • ‘Even when I went on the program and I told him the truth he still decided to go with it.’
    • 2Have a romantic or sexual relationship with:

      ‘he goes with other women’
      • ‘I don't agree with one-night stands but would rather do that then go with a prostitute.’
      • ‘I have been going with a guy for about a year and we moved in together two months ago.’
      • ‘I had been engaged to this girl for eight months and I had been going with her for a couple of years.’
      • ‘Can you at least let word get out that in fact you are not going with The Junior?’
      • ‘She said a lesbian is an English word that means someone who goes with other women.’
  • go without

    • Suffer lack or deprivation:

      ‘I like to give my children what they want, even if I have to go without’
      • ‘The kind of car I could afford wouldn't have been reliable enough to go any distance, so I went without.’
      • ‘Mrs Croft, who went without her salary to keep the charity afloat, will receive nearly £11,000 in back pay.’
      • ‘It was always the last day, the Saturday, or the Thursday, that I went without.’
      • ‘We were not well off but never went without a meal.’
      • ‘People who worry about wealth usually have never gone without.’
      • ‘My mother was economical and a good manager, so we never went without any necessities.’
      • ‘Yep, those were hard times. We had a lot of fun, too. I never remember us ever going without.’
      abstain from, forgo, refrain from, do without, deny oneself
      lack for something, go short, go hungry, be in need, be deprived, be in want, suffer deprivation
      View synonyms

Origin

Old English gān, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch gaan and German gehen; the form went was originally the past tense of wend.

Pronunciation

go

/ɡəʊ/

Main definitions of go in English

: go1go2

go2

noun

  • [mass noun] A Japanese board game of territorial possession and capture.

    • ‘The game that does seem to me to be superior to chess, in that it has both depth and simplicity, is the Japanese game of Go.’
    • ‘Yet both superpowers thought of it as another territory to compete over in a global game of go.’

Origin

Late 19th century: Japanese, literally small stone, also the name of the game.

Pronunciation

go

/ɡəʊ/