Definition of glebe house in English:

glebe house

noun

historical
  • A church house provided for a member of the clergy.

    • ‘Sheridan Le Fanu was educated privately in Abington glebe house during the disturbances, before entering Trinity College, Dublin, in 1832.’
    • ‘The glebe house is situated near the northern boundary.’
    • ‘He memorialized the archbishop for permission to erect a glebe house in 1784, and received a grant of £100 for this purpose from the Board of First Fruits.’
    • ‘On it he built a glebe house and offices, the only one then in this county, and expended therein more than a thousand pounds.’
    • ‘As soon as he could fit up the glebe house for his reception he resided in it, and has continued religiously and conscientiously to do so, ever since.’
    • ‘The glebe-house was built in 1822, by aid of a gift of 450 and a loan of 50 from the former Board.’
    • ‘While there he built a glebe house, restored the fabric of the church, and with Thomas Boyce of Bannow House founded Bannow agricultural school on a farm of 40 acres.’
    • ‘Hayward died a wealthy man on 27 June 1627 in the parish of St Bartholomew-the-Great, Smithfield, where he had lived for many years in the grandest of the glebe houses in Bartholomew Close.’
    • ‘Many of his architectural designs were for glebe houses to accommodate the clergy, others for churches.’
    • ‘The tithes should be sold at a moderate valuation, and a fund established, which would not only provide amply for the clergy, but enable them to build glebe houses.’
    • ‘The living is a rectory, yearly value 800, with a glebe house, in the a gift of the Earl of Abergavenny, and held by the Rev. Sir Henry Thompson, Bart.’
    • ‘The church of the union is at Six-mile-bridge, and the glebe-house is in the parish of Bunratty.’
    minister's house
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