Definition of give someone a mouthful in English:

give someone a mouthful

phrase

British
informal
  • Talk to or shout at someone in an angry or critical way:

    ‘she gave him a mouthful—I'd never heard her speak like this before’
    • ‘She said: ‘Some of them apologise and move on, but others just give you a mouthful.’’
    • ‘If you read my story and didn't see your name on my ‘thank you’ list, email me and give me a mouthful!’
    • ‘I managed at one time to get to the telephone and ring the Philippine consul in Nicosia, who rang the owners of the taverna and gave them a mouthful.’
    • ‘If anyone in her neighbourhood dared to question what I was doing there, or why I took photographs, she gave them a mouthful.’
    • ‘Eventually, even he couldn't stop me from standing up and giving Megson a mouthful back.’
    • ‘On objecting to this I was given a mouthful of verbal abuse by youths who presumably had nothing better to do in the school holidays than make a nuisance of themselves.’
    • ‘‘But I did have one woman recently give me a mouthful of abuse telling me I was being cruel to the dog,’ Mrs Bloomfield said.’
    • ‘The driver then proceeded to give me a mouthful about how cyclists should be more careful.’
    • ‘Your average traffic cop must pull over hundreds of motorists a month, many of whom are going to give him a mouthful.’
    • ‘Bejaysus but if Libby didn't blow up again and gave her a mouthful of abuse for bein' such an interferin' busybody.’
    • ‘I finally get so tired of hearing my name yelled that I stop… fully intending to give him a mouthful.’
    • ‘They'd pass their phone to me and Strawhorn would give me a mouthful.’