Definition of give in English:

give

verb

  • 1with two objects Freely transfer the possession of (something) to (someone)

    ‘she gave him presents and clothes’
    ‘the cheque given to the jeweller proved worthless’
    with object ‘he gave the papers back’
    • ‘The proceeds of the raffle were given to charity.’
    • ‘The Maypole was traditionally given to the community by the local gentry.’
    • ‘Prizes are given to the best dancing couple and the couple who stays at the floor for the longest time.’
    • ‘This cash is given to farmers across the EU to help prop up their businesses through massive subsidies.’
    • ‘All the money from sales is given to charity, the artist will accept no remuneration for his work.’
    • ‘The 505-acre site was given to the trust by a mystery donor who bought it early in 2002.’
    • ‘The awards are given to children who achieved something against the odds.’
    • ‘Trey goes to the cupboard and comes back with two bags of chips, giving one to Bailey and keeping one for himself.’
    • ‘The tokens are given to customers after they pay for their goods at checkout.’
    • ‘It was given to me by his mom, Arlene, as a proud memorial to her son.’
    • ‘She seemed unable to say ‘no’ to her son and is believed to have given him large amounts of money.’
    • ‘No spare cash was given to Brown to finance his trip back to Glasgow.’
    • ‘The property was given to the church to be used, not to be sold on.’
    • ‘He said the mens' weekly wages were given to them by the side of a roadway or in the woods where they may be working.’
    • ‘Your doctor tells you about the benefits of quitting and gives you some leaflets with useful advice and helpline phone numbers in them’
    • ‘Most people who come to the tills are perfectly happy to give the suggested donation and many give more than is suggested.’
    • ‘These awards were given to them for their kindness and generosity to their neighbours.’
    • ‘If his first encounter of the day was with a sweeper, superstition dictated that he stop to give her five rupees.’
    • ‘Offerings are given to the Gods as an act of giving something that one loves to the loved ones, he says.’
    • ‘He has since been on bail and always denied any impropriety, maintaining the items were given to him by his employer.’
    present with, provide with, supply with, furnish with, gift with
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Administer (medicine)
      ‘she was given antibiotics’
      • ‘People unable to swallow safely after a stroke can be given aspirin as a suppository.’
      • ‘On your return visit your dentist may give you another local anaesthetic to make the area numb.’
      • ‘Small children often cannot manage to lie still for a long time, and may need to be given a general anaesthetic.’
      • ‘Once they have been given antibiotics they will only be infectious for five days.’
      • ‘If any lead is found, more tests will be taken and your child may be given medication.’
    2. 1.2with object Hand over (an amount) in payment; pay.
      ‘how much did you give for that?’
      • ‘‘What would you give for it?’ he continued. ‘Gee, I don't know. I don't have any Brazilian money anyway.’’
      • ‘I had an email from a guy who was a dealer asking me to cancel the auction and let him give me £800 cash for the pair of them.’
      • ‘In this system, money could be given as a present, but it could not be given as direct payment.’
      • ‘‘At last,’ he exclaimed, in an excitable way, ‘a bid of £25,000 from Mr Clarkson. Now. Who'll give me £26,000?’’
      • ‘Now it was down to the bartering. ‘What'll you give for the apricots?’’
      pay, pay up, hand over, part with, give, put in, contribute, donate
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    3. 1.3with object Used hyperbolically to express how greatly one wants to have or do something.
      ‘I'd give anything for a cup of tea’
      • ‘What wouldn't you give for six weeks off work?’
      • ‘As well as missing his company, he often mentioned what he would give for the same opportunity.’
      • ‘What I would give for a quiet train carriage running from Kilkenny to Dublin on Fridays.’
      • ‘Yet what would the English give for France's record now of three Grand Slams in the last six years?’
      • ‘What would the Lawn Tennis Association would give for a player of here calibre?’
      sacrifice, give up, relinquish
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    4. 1.4with object Commit or entrust.
      ‘a baby given into their care by the accident of her birth’
      • ‘Each group is then given into the care of a group leader who will then stay with that group for the whole of their stay.’
      • ‘The child was given into the custody of the mother.’
      • ‘Any investment property can be given into the care of a property management company.’
      • ‘Maybe she was afraid of committing and giving herself and her heart to someone.’
      entrust, commit, put into someone's hands, consign, assign, render
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    5. 1.5with object Freely set aside or devote for a purpose.
      ‘all who have given thought to the matter agree’
      no object ‘committees who give so generously of their time and effort’
      • ‘I have been giving some thought as to how the annoying buzzing sound of model aircraft can be, to other listeners, a mere gentle drone?’
      • ‘His energy is used only for composing and for music - as well as the ludicrously generous amount of time he gives to his students.’
      • ‘I want to thank the many people who gave generously of their time on the legal support team.’
      • ‘A great many people gave very generously of their time, money and energy to make it a reality.’
      • ‘Well, for starters, they should receive a decent income for giving their time to public service.’
      • ‘This did not prevent him from giving considerable time to public activities.’
      • ‘I pretty much give my time to whoever needs it, and for me that's maybe how it should be.’
      • ‘You must have given a great deal of thought to this.’
      • ‘If you're like many college students, you've probably given some thought to attending graduate or professional school.’
      • ‘Many people have already given freely of their time and efforts to help so many unfortunate people.’
      present with, provide with, supply with, furnish with, gift with
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    6. 1.6dated with object (of a man) sanction the marriage of (his daughter) to someone.
      ‘he gave her in marriage to a noble’
      • ‘In those days, the father of the bride held a great feast, then gave his daughter to the bridegroom.’
      • ‘Then, finally, he gave her in marriage to a son of the Duke of Capua, who a short time later left her a widow.’
      • ‘He gave his daughter to Krishna in marriage after a stately religious ceremony.’
    7. 1.7give oneself todated (of a woman) consent to have sexual intercourse with (a man)
      ‘she gave herself to the king in order to obtain the pardon of her father’
      • ‘I'm not giving myself to some guy just so he can brag about it to his buddies.’
      • ‘I would like to give myself to him, but I have reasons not to.’
      • ‘I know a newlywed couple who have sex less than once a month because of this - he doesn't respect her, she knows it, and she doesn't trust him, so she doesn't want to give herself to him.’
      • ‘I think on all the times he touched me, on all the times I came so close to giving myself to him, held back only by deeply ingrained ideas of right and wrong.’
      • ‘It still scares me to think of giving myself to him.’
    8. 1.8 Used to present a speaker or entertainer or when making a toast.
      ‘for your entertainment this evening I give you … Mister Albert DeNero!’
      • ‘Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the first superhero movie for grownups.’
      • ‘Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the Queen!’
      • ‘Ladies and gentlemen, I give you… The Royal Family.’
      • ‘It is a great pleasure to give to you a tireless advocate for our Nation’s intellectual property system - and a distinguished public servant - the Secretary of Commerce, William M. Daley.’
      • ‘Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the 13 th greatest Canadian of all time.’
      • ‘Ladies and gentleman, all the way from San Ramon, California, I give you… Mark Busby!’
      • ‘Ladies and Gentlemen I give you my pub of the year - The Bull's Head in Chislehurst.’
  • 2with two objects Cause or allow (someone or something) to have or experience (something); provide with.

    ‘you gave me such a fright’
    with object ‘this leaflet gives our opening times’
    • ‘Her experiences gave her a sense of empathy and responsibility, she says.’
    • ‘Cassidy read the note over a few more times before the telephone rang and gave her a start.’
    • ‘On the second day there I was given the opportunity to speak to children in the afternoon at the local junior school.’
    • ‘He said the experience gave him a new appreciation for small business owners.’
    • ‘The experience gives him a newfound confidence that might be mistaken for sentimentality.’
    • ‘The experience gave her a huge lift, as she has suffered from several personal tragedies in recent years.’
    • ‘Every single politician we spoke to gave us their wholehearted support.’
    • ‘Various resources in the community would contribute to giving the family a new start.’
    • ‘Children and families come to the centre for support, and are given opportunities they might not get at home.’
    • ‘She advised Zoe to apply for work experience to give her a taste of the job.’
    • ‘Lorraine was not given the opportunity to speak during the service, something she regrets.’
    • ‘Playing last year in the USA was a great experience and it has given me a real taste for travel.’
    • ‘This new experience had given her a sense of peace which she was loathe to let go of.’
    • ‘I think all the experience had given me a feeling for what individual audiences want.’
    • ‘You do these things because you hope that they will give you pleasure.’
    • ‘As a relationship develops, each shared experience gives us the chance to check out if we're compatible.’
    • ‘Charity work can be very satisfying, as well as giving you work experience.’
    • ‘That gave us experience of booking a hall, doing the publicity and selling tickets.’
    • ‘Composed, but upbeat and twinkly, Fran says the experience has given her a balanced perspective on life.’
    • ‘All federal members of parliament will be given the right to speak and move motions.’
    allow, permit, let have, grant, accord
    show, display, set out, set forth, indicate, detail, give details of, list
    cause, be a source of, make, create, occasion
    administer, deliver, deal
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 Provide (love or other emotional support) to.
      ‘his parents gave him the encouragement he needed’
      ‘he was very giving and supportive’
      • ‘He needs just the same love and support that any parent would give at a time like this.’
      • ‘We would like to hear from people who feel able to give emotional support to the bereaved.’
      • ‘You are generous and giving to friends, loved ones and family but impatient of opposition.’
      • ‘The staff gave all their love, care and support, thus enabling me to overcome my fears.’
      • ‘I have been giving my support and providing inspiration to all of these new bodies, because I see that they add to the total momentum of what we are able to do.’
      • ‘Throughout the emotional ordeal the doctors and nurses were on hand to give her support and advice.’
      • ‘Mom gave her unconditional love and devotion to each and every one of her children.’
      • ‘All the medical staff have given me the highest level of dedication, care and support they could have given.’
      • ‘And the support Sure Start gives to parents is helping families not just to cope, but to prosper.’
      • ‘But just as much as he loved giving affection, he also liked being on the receiving end of it.’
      • ‘Maybe they have given them emotional support during a difficult period in their life.’
      • ‘Since his death, family, friends and neighbours have given their support to Tracey.’
      • ‘The club are happy to see more parents attending games and giving their support to the players.’
      • ‘All of us in the house try to give as much love and guidance and support as we possibly can.’
      • ‘Mr Peters said he wanted to thank the Bolton public for the support he had been given.’
      • ‘She has enjoyed being able to give love and support to the elderly and motivate her staff to do the same.’
      • ‘We try to give them emotional support and an idea of what is right and wrong.’
      • ‘The women's network has given them emotional support to try to talk to their parents.’
      • ‘Call a friend or family member who can help you and give you emotional support.’
      • ‘We are prepared to give as much support or advice as is needed to help.’
      present with, provide with, supply with, furnish with, gift with
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    2. 2.2 Sentence (someone) to (a specified penalty)
      ‘for the first offence I was given a fine’
      • ‘The court was told he was given his first sentence in a young offenders' institution when he was only 15.’
      • ‘The painting was returned unharmed a week later and the thief was given only a brief sentence.’
      • ‘She was convicted of manslaughter, but they gave her a suspended sentence.’
      • ‘What kind of court gives such an easy sentence to a repeat offender?’
      • ‘He was given an additional four-month sentence for skipping court, after going on the run for a year.’
      • ‘If he breaks the order he could be charged with a criminal offence and be given a jail sentence.’
      • ‘It is a waste of time giving him a six-month sentence unless it is in addition to the sentence he is already serving.’
      • ‘He was given a four-month prison sentence in February for having a fake passport.’
      • ‘That conviction was downgraded to manslaughter on appeal and he was given a five-year sentence.’
      • ‘He was given a six-month sentence suspended at Leeds Crown Court on Monday.’
      • ‘The judge in the case said he could serve the sentences concurrently, and gave him 11 years.’
      • ‘He was given an automatic life sentence because of previous offences.’
      • ‘A charge of treason was dropped, but he was given a prison sentence of ten years for abandoning his post.’
      • ‘He was given a one-year prison sentence suspended on the grounds that he posed no further danger to society.’
      • ‘Again, contrary to popular belief, we give people longer sentences now than we have ever done.’
      • ‘As well as his prison sentence he was also given another three year driving ban.’
      • ‘He was given a suspended sentence on condition he obtained counselling.’
      • ‘Three other men were also given custodial sentences yesterday after admitting affray at the same game.’
      • ‘The four gang members were given sentences totalling ten years for the attacks.’
      • ‘He was given a five-year jail sentence earlier this year for causing death by dangerous driving.’
      administer, deliver, deal
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    3. 2.3 Allot (a score) to.
      ‘I gave it five out of ten’
      • ‘Some light hiss in one episode prevents me from giving this a perfect score, however.’
      • ‘Some light crackling noises and loud pops are disorienting and prevent me from giving a higher score.’
      • ‘It is clearly implicit in the Tribunal's findings that Mr Rihal was given a lower score as a result of his race.’
      • ‘She was a good dancer in her art school and was given a high score in the dancing test.’
      • ‘The rest of the film was brilliant. I would give it nine out of 10.’
    4. 2.4 Allow (someone) to have (a specified amount of time) for an activity or undertaking.
      ‘give me a second to bring the car around’
      with object ‘I'll give you until tomorrow morning’
      • ‘Since each speaker was given only three minutes, many questions could not be brought up.’
      • ‘You imagine being given five minutes to escape before men on horses set out to lasso you in.’
      • ‘Luca glanced at his watch, and decided to give Eve another five minutes, just in case.’
      • ‘She was a little late coming out, so he suggested we leave it and go home, but I held firm and said we'd give her five minutes.’
      • ‘It gave him a small amount of time to think as he began his way up the flights of stairs, skipping steps.’
      • ‘We're given a certain amount of time to prove that we are worthy of going to heaven.’
      • ‘Mills was given five weeks off and his own studio in order to make his first serious sculpture.’
      • ‘A Colchester nightclub has been given six months to carry out work to reduce noise and disturbance.’
      • ‘That gives us until Tuesday afternoon and if we have second thoughts, we'll get our money back.’
      • ‘Of course, they were always said to be playing a long game and were given 15 years to produce results.’
      • ‘Credit card providers give consumers up to 59 days to pay their bill and if you pay your balance in full by this date you won't be charged any interest.’
      • ‘To start the evening each candidate was given four minutes to introduce themselves and their party to the audience.’
      • ‘Wilson Railways has been given 12 months to produce the first stage of its feasibility study.’
      • ‘This time he requested, and was granted, the first slot in the Arthur Ashe Stadium, giving him the maximum amount of time to recover.’
      • ‘As I gave myself five minutes for the job, reading the book was out of the question.’
      • ‘The participating countries have been given five years to complete phasing-out.’
      • ‘The presiding judge has given both parties a year to settle their differences before a trial.’
      • ‘I told her I would give her until the end of the week for her to get back to me about this case.’
      • ‘There would also be people who had lived in the area for years who simply did not want to sell - in which case they would be given up to three months after the neighbourhood has been levelled to change their minds.’
      • ‘The contract has been on the table since last week and Henderson was originally given until tomorrow to make up his mind.’
    5. 2.5 Pass on (an illness or infection) to (someone)
      ‘I hope I don't give you my cold’
      • ‘You potentially gave him a disease that could shatter him emotionally and ruin his future relationships while knowing that you were infected.’
      • ‘Neither was she going to risk giving the cold to Richard or Matthew.’
      • ‘My wife was involved with someone about a year before we met who apparently gave her a bad case of chlamydia.’
      • ‘I hope I don't give you my cold.’
    6. 2.6 Pass (a message) to (someone)
      ‘give my love to all the girls’
      • ‘In effect, by doing nothing the Minister is giving a Government message that we do not care if people abuse trusts.’
      • ‘The message would have to be given in a subtle not a patronising way.’
      • ‘It gives a clear social message and has a clear social benefit.’
      • ‘Should we be giving young people the message that drugs are the answer?’
      • ‘That seems to typify the message the Government gives to New Zealanders.’
      • ‘This approach gives a very mixed message, as was all too clear from the press coverage of the latest report published in January.’
      • ‘In his own way, the bishop was repeating the message that Jesus gave the rich young man.’
      • ‘The most important message we have to give is that his death was not a random act.’
      • ‘He looked almost bored with repeating the message he had given on countless other occasions.’
      • ‘Canon John Young gives his Christmas message, seeking hope and happiness at the end of a long and sometimes troubling year.’
      • ‘She wanted to give a very clear message that bullying was not acceptable in schools.’
      • ‘It just really gives a very important message to parents to watch out for their kids.’
      • ‘I wonder whether the senior Government whip is giving that message to his Ministers and to his caucus.’
      • ‘A leaflet has been compiled giving drivers the strong message that speed kills.’
      • ‘I have a very simple message to give those who are listening to the debate in the House today.’
      • ‘Fed-up rail commuters have been given a message of hope from fellow travellers on Merseyside.’
      • ‘And by and large the message that they gave very clearly was that they are interested in politics.’
      • ‘I had a go at the commercial manager for not having given me a telephone message.’
      • ‘Get big or get out was the message our government policies gave to the farmers.’
      • ‘My concern is that the message given by our Government is that alcohol is OK.’
      convey, pass on, impart, communicate, transmit, transfer
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    7. 2.7usually in imperative Make a connection to allow (someone) to speak to (someone else) on the telephone.
      ‘give me the police’
      • ‘I'm done talking to you - now give me the manager.’
      • ‘Yes, give me the police. Hurry, please.’
      • ‘If you can't give me your manager then transfer me to someone else and I will speak to their manager.’
      • ‘‘Can you give me the police station, please?’ I say, very quietly.’
  • 3with object Carry out or perform (a specified action)

    ‘I gave a bow’
    with two objects ‘he gave the counter a polish’
    • ‘Louisa squeals and gives Georgie a big hug and a kiss on the cheek, then does the same to her father.’
    • ‘If all this sounds familiar, give yourself a pat on the back for paying attention.’
    • ‘She knew she sounded crazy and the look her sister gave her confirmed it that she sounded crazy.’
    • ‘I looked up at her, to see her give me a gentle smile.’
    • ‘She gave Bond a ringing slap across the eyes and burst into tears.’
    • ‘The man gave a tight lipped smile, nodding as he downed half the drink and lost his breath.’
    • ‘Allie drummed slender fingers on the table's shiny surface, giving her head a shake.’
    • ‘He gives one of his rumbling belly laughs, then replies that he is certainly not Superman.’
    • ‘He tried and failed to sound reassuring, giving his most trustworthy smile.’
    • ‘He raised one eyebrow, stared steadily at her and then gave a short nod.’
    • ‘She slammed her locker shut and clicked the lock, giving Jacob a funny smile with the eyebrow raised again.’
    • ‘She didn't bother answering that, giving him a scathing look instead.’
    • ‘Bang on time, she walked past my window, this time giving me a little smile.’
    • ‘She scanned his face for a full minute, then gave a slow nod.’
    perform, execute, carry out
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    1. 3.1 Produce (a sound)
      ‘he gave a gasp’
      • ‘It gave a low, thrilling sound; and Toki began to sing, and his voice had in song a sweetness it never had in speech.’
      • ‘His wrist gave an ugly grinding sound and searing pain tore through him like knives.’
      • ‘The bear reappeared briefly, gave a few more roars, then disappeared into the woods.’
      • ‘The others quickly ran up the stairs, each one giving a loud squeaking noise.’
      • ‘After giving a somewhat amused snort at my audacity, he asked me what it was I wanted to know.’
      • ‘The audience gives a great collective gasp, their snacks forgotten.’
      • ‘He puts his hand over hers and she squeezes it, he gives this sad little sound.’
      • ‘"No, " he said, making her give an exasperated grunt.’
      • ‘They seemed to enjoy themselves as I heard her give an annoyingly sweet laugh.’
      • ‘I heard the girl give a very animal-like growl and jump from the ferry in pursuit.’
      • ‘She started, giving a little gasp herself and turned back to look at him.’
      • ‘I heard her give an audible sigh before giving me a weak smile.’
      • ‘Her companion widened her eyes in amazement and gave a little indulgent gasp.’
      • ‘The principle gave a very unladylike snort and tried to cover it up with a cough.’
      • ‘He just leaned forward himself and gave a tiny, bubbly laugh.’
      • ‘It quickly backed away giving a noise that sounded a bit like a whimper.’
      • ‘Nat gave a louder gasp that drew some more shuffles from the other side of the room.’
      • ‘At the middle, he froze too as the pillar gave a huge groaning noise and crumbled.’
      utter, let out, emit
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    2. 3.2 Present (an appearance or impression)
      ‘he gave no sign of life’
      • ‘Now the impression is being given that the system is splitting apart at the seams.’
      • ‘It's decor gives the appearance of a provincial diner, but the menu is far more fusion than a specific cuisine.’
      • ‘Neither constitution gave the impression of a governmental system built to last.’
      • ‘It may be that the reporting of these suggestions gave the impression that they were already council policy.’
      • ‘Those selling on unauthorised pitches gives the public the impression there are hundreds of vendors.’
      • ‘The area by the riverside and the housing behind give a very tidy appearance.’
      • ‘There are already some fishing industries closed in Walvis Bay on various grounds which gives a very bad impression of the economy.’
      • ‘Reading through some of this stuff gives a really bad impression of me, I'm sure.’
      • ‘Many other gowns were ornamented with a lot of beads without giving an Art Deco impression.’
      • ‘The net curtains in the front window droop in the middle, Gill points out, which gives a bad first impression from outside.’
      • ‘It is not arguable that his presence gives a reasonable appearance of bias.’
      • ‘This is an honest editorial and gives a very good impression to the outside world of the Korean press.’
      • ‘The aim is to portray a more dynamic, up-to-date image and give a better impression of what the council is about.’
      • ‘If you look at a top class rider on a well schooled horse that immediately gives an impression of beauty, take a closer look at them.’
      • ‘The report did not give a grossly unfair impression of the hospital and his letter only serves to mislead the public again.’
      • ‘But how about hiring some people who at least give the indication of being able to do something worth watching.’
      • ‘Worse, it gives the appearance of conversation when actually there is none.’
      • ‘Councillor Margaret Howes said she believed the signs gave the impression that the town was violent.’
      • ‘They certainly do not give a great first impression to tourists whom York traders rely on.’
      • ‘Morrison gives a very good impression of being totally serious.’
      show, display, set out, set forth, indicate, detail, give details of, list
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    3. 3.3 Provide (a party or social meal) as host or hostess.
      ‘a dinner given in honour of an American diplomat’
      with two objects ‘Kate gave him a leaving party’
      • ‘The subject was raised at a dinner party he gave for staff attending the literary festival.’
      • ‘She gives lavish dinner parties when entertaining her husband's business friends.’
      • ‘Hell, if I replaced the kitchen, I'd have to justify it by giving regular dinner parties.’
      • ‘You just shouldn't spend that much money on giving your thirteen-year-old a party.’
      • ‘Recently I gave a very elegant dinner party and invited everyone I want to impress at my new job.’
      • ‘We were guests of honour and given a slap up feast, then my friends went on stage to play their set.’
      • ‘This way you won't keep the neighbors up at night just because you are giving a back yard party.’
      • ‘The only time I met him was at a dinner party given by one of his sons, who was an Oxford friend of mine.’
      • ‘The General and Lady Spears came out and stayed quite a long time during the dry season, giving a very grand party to which nearly everyone was invited.’
      • ‘The gorgeous house where you could give those dinner parties is the same kind of house Lynette wishes she could escape.’
      • ‘There will always be time to go to work, clean the house, give a dinner party and fix the waste disposal unit.’
      • ‘He gives the dullest parties in town and is stingy with the drinks.’
      • ‘But basically people give dinner parties at home because they want to be liked.’
      • ‘A great reception was given to the winners when they were presented with their prizes.’
      organize, arrange, lay on, provide, be responsible for
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  • 4with object Yield as a product or result.

    ‘milk is sometimes added to give a richer cheese’
    • ‘He believes that bead blasting with aluminum oxide gives a finer finished product than glass bead.’
    • ‘Microwave irradiation can also allow the use of less or no solvent and can produce fewer byproducts, giving a purer product.’
    • ‘The first gives a neater result, while the second, which I think the more interesting, is not for the fainthearted.’
    • ‘The finest recipes omit the semolina, giving an extra spongy result.’
    • ‘The main dining area is circular, with high windows giving a very light and airy feel to the place.’
    • ‘The lights look wonderful giving a very festive air to the village and are a credit to those responsible for putting them up.’
    • ‘I've used leaf gelatine, which is well worth tracking down as it gives a much finer result.’
    • ‘Treating the material when it is flat gives much better results.’
    • ‘However, the kind of technology that we have developed gives a very high yield indeed.’
    • ‘The colour combination gives an exotic appearance, setting this daffodil apart from others.’
    • ‘By the way, I do not recommend using hedge trimmers as it gives a too sheared appearance.’
    • ‘A single pesticidal product rarely gives the most effective and economical control.’
    • ‘Russ always wanted to have a Saxophone in the band as it gives a ‘party’ feeling to the music.’
    produce, yield, afford, result in
    View synonyms
    1. 4.1give something off/out/forth Emit odour, vapour, or similar substances.
      ‘some solvents give off toxic fumes’
      • ‘These granules absorb water and give it off as the plants need it.’
      • ‘When an electron falls from a higher energy level to a lower energy level, a photon is given off.’
      • ‘The practical result of this is that the anions are given off at the anode, generally in the form of a gas and the cations are often deposited at the cathode as a metal layer.’
      • ‘Mr. Carter testified that certain chemicals were used in the plant, and fumes were given off when materials were processed.’
      • ‘Soil that falls apart and gives off few air bubbles has poor aggregate stability.’
      • ‘Commercial-grade phosphorus holds energy for hours, though a majority is given off in the first 10 minutes.’
      • ‘Massive concrete floor slabs provide thermal storage, collecting heat and giving it off again later on.’
      • ‘Some of the carbon is given off as carbon dioxide gas, but much of it remains locked up in organic molecules that help sustain the rest of the food web.’
      • ‘It turned out that the oils are given off by vegetation during dry spells and are adsorbed on to the surface of rocks and soil particles, to be released into the air again by the next rains.’
      • ‘Therefore this energy is given off, cooling the gas.’
      • ‘As the air cools, it contracts and loses some of its capacity, so the moisture is given off to cooler surrounding surfaces.’
      • ‘As needed, this chemical energy can be given off as electric energy, the discharge.’
      • ‘The gas was made of uncharged atoms, but when an electric current passed through it, negatively charged particles in the form of rays were given off.’
      • ‘You didn't mention what fumes were given off by the overheated coating, but I was told at the time that it was similar to mustard gas.’
      • ‘All of its kinetic energy went into moving current inside the conductive ring (and I'm sure the ring's resistance gave that energy off as heat).’
      • ‘There was a spillage inside Boots this morning and fumes were given off and over the course of the morning the staff became increasingly unwell so they called the emergency services.’
      • ‘Plants play a key role in cycling water through the basin, taking moisture up through their roots, then giving it off as water vapor through leaves, stems, and trunks.’
      • ‘The fire itself could burn anything to the bone, but no external heat was given off.’
      • ‘When you agitate the contents with a swirling motion, it will feel as if there were liquid in the pan until all the gases have been given off.’
      • ‘One of the problems with this model is that much of the energy is given off as neutrally charged particles that cannot be harnessed.’
      emit, produce, send out, send forth, pour out, throw out
      View synonyms
  • 5with object Concede (something) as valid or deserved in respect of (someone)

    ‘give him his due’
    • ‘We've had some good derbies against them in recent seasons but will be giving them the respect they deserve.’
    • ‘We will be fully focussed and we will give them the respect they deserve but not too much.’
    • ‘Give it your all, but most of all look like you know what you are doing and give the fans the respect they deserve.’
    • ‘So, if the visuals are not given the proper attention they deserve, the film will duly suffer.’
    • ‘She's pretty, you have to give her that much.’
    • ‘Again, McNamara must be given credit for the forward run and the timing of Sutton's lay off was perfect.’
    • ‘He must be given credit for coming forward to the police.’
    • ‘To give him his due, the counter clerk refused to be intimidated.’
    • ‘Socks are a vital part of your walking kit yet they are rarely given the attention that they deserve.’
    • ‘The new administration should be given passing marks for its swift reaction to the quake.’
    • ‘Her photographs deserve far more than this, and the compiler gives them their due.’
    • ‘Thank you for taking the time to read this and giving it the serious consideration that it deserves.’
    • ‘It was because when they treated us like that they are not giving women the respect we deserve.’
    • ‘Overwhelmed with material today, I shall have to postpone giving her arguments the attention they deserve.’
    • ‘Please give these mums the respect they deserve, they're not out to ruin your day, honest!’
    1. 5.1give something for Place a specified value on (something)
      ‘he never gave anything for French painting’
      • ‘He apparently didn't give anything for ‘high’ culture.’
      • ‘‘I give nothing for your advice,’ Lou growled.’
    2. 5.2with object and complement (of an umpire or referee) declare whether or not (a player) is out or offside.
      ‘Gooch was given out, caught behind’
      • ‘It is similar to umpires giving No. 11 batsmen out more readily than top-order batsmen.’
      • ‘He hits the stumps, appeals, and the umpire gives him run-out.’
      • ‘Sadly the umpire gave him out for the ball hitting his glove.’
      • ‘The ref gave him offside when it looked exactly the same as the previous incident.’
      • ‘The Australians then appealed, but the umpire also, not hearing any sound, gave Hobbs not out.’
      • ‘Batsmen are infuriated when they are given out wrongly, but do not reverse incorrect decisions which work the other way around.’
    3. 5.3 Adjudicate that (a goal) has been legitimately scored.
      ‘the referee gave the goal’
      • ‘The last thing Leeds need right now is podgy referees overruling linesmen and giving seriously dodgy goals against them.’
      • ‘The referee gave the goal to me, and isn't the referee's decision final?’
      • ‘After consulting with the linesman, the referee gives the goal despite animated protests from the furious German team.’
      • ‘Smith, believing that a goal had been given, blasted the ball into the net only to find out he had made a terrible blunder.’
      • ‘He was ten or 15 yards away and gave the goal, then the assistant referee flagged for an alleged handball offence.’
      allow, permit, let have, grant, accord
      View synonyms
  • 6with object State or put forward (information or argument)

    ‘he did not give his name’
    • ‘To be fair, Kevin Drum also didn't like it, but gives rather better reasons which he went on to justify.’
    • ‘Given that this is the only basis you give for objecting to certain facts, I put it to you that it is rather weak.’
    • ‘This may seem contrived, but essentially the same argument can be given in a more natural form.’
    • ‘A reason politicians often give for not legalising cannabis is that it leads to harder drugs.’
    • ‘Can you give some more information about where you are working or what the project is?’
    • ‘One logical reason I often give for this is that I can move faster and keep warmer in trousers.’
    • ‘The union may require the information to be given in writing but not that any particular documents be produced.’
    • ‘In contrast, the daily life exhibit gives little or no information on the daily life of the ancient Egyptians.’
    • ‘He spoke only to give his name and personal details during the five-minute hearing.’
    • ‘The initial argument, given by those who had read from the books, put Wuthering Heights firmly in the lead.’
    • ‘The solicitors now gave rather more details of Mr Lumley's past history.’
    • ‘John gave a general synopsis and managed the slides and Jo gave a more detailed explanation.’
    reveal, disclose, divulge, let slip, leak, let out
    View synonyms
    1. 6.1 Pledge or offer as a guarantee.
      with two objects ‘I give you my word’
      • ‘I give you my pledge that if I become the President of the United States, America will keep its defenses alert and fully sufficient to meet any danger.’
      • ‘By signing those notes he gave his word that he would honour the debt.’
      • ‘I give you my word that you will never, ever regret it.’
      • ‘I give my honour that I shall be ready to depart by the middle of April.’
    2. 6.2with two objects, usually with negative Say to (someone) as an excuse or inappropriate answer.
      ‘don't give me any of your backchat’
      • ‘Don't give me that tired old excuse. You have a kid, you pay for him.’
      • ‘Don't give me that nonsense that you are saving the environment.’
      • ‘Don't give me your lies about freedom, peace and democracy.’
      administer, deliver, deal
      View synonyms
    3. 6.3 Deliver (a judgement) authoritatively.
      ‘I gave my verdict’
      • ‘On Thursday the tribunal was adjourned to allow the panel to consider legal issues in the case before giving their judgement.’
      • ‘It is understood a mass verdict will be given when the hearings have finally ended.’
      • ‘She fell silent for a few minutes, before giving her verdict.’
      • ‘Dame Elizabeth, giving her ruling in London, told the court that in her judgment Greater Manchester Newspapers Ltd was in breach of an injunction she granted in January 8 this year to protect the pair after their release.’
      • ‘Mr Justice Munby was giving his ruling in an adoption case where a woman was paid just 1,000 US dollars to hand over her newborn daughter to an adoption agency.’
      • ‘The hearing ended on Thursday and Mr Justice Sullivan will give his judgement this week.’
      • ‘The judge saw the film for himself and gave his verdict in a matter of a few days.’
    4. 6.4informal Predict that (an activity or relationship) will last no longer than (a specified time)
      ‘this is a place that will not improve with time—I give it three weeks’
      • ‘I give that relationship a month at the most.’
      • ‘She's also dating this high-class guy. I give it two weeks.’
      • ‘And by the time the voters have had enough of this, the banking tax scandal will be long forgotten - I'd give it a week at most.’
    5. 6.5informal no object Tell what one knows.
      ‘okay, give—what's that all about?’
      • ‘So give! What's happening with him?’
      • ‘OK, give: Why the cut?’
      • ‘So give, what's the reason behind it?’
      • ‘So come on. Give. What's the bad news?’
      • ‘Alright. Give. What's up? You still have a secret, don't you?’
  • 7no object Alter in shape under pressure rather than resist or break.

    ‘that chair doesn't give’
    • ‘Is it because the clubface gives a little, resulting in slightly less deformation of the ball during impact?’
    • ‘To test them, press one with your finger and it should just give under the pressure.’
    • ‘The butter is softened enough when it gives slightly when pressed but still holds its shape.’
    • ‘If the flesh gives under light pressure without falling apart, the fish is perfectly done.’
    • ‘Either way, it's ready when the skin gives easily under pressure and the meat is tender.’
    give way, cave in, collapse, break, fall apart, come apart
    View synonyms
    1. 7.1 Yield or give way to pressure.
      ‘the heavy door didn't give until the fifth push’
      figurative ‘when two people who don't get on are thrust together, something's got to give’
      • ‘The ice gave and broke with the weight.’
      • ‘The door finally gave but not without the hinges making a loud protest.’
      • ‘He had Sam by the wrist and could feel the bone giving under the pressure he was exerting.’
      • ‘The situation escalates to the point that something has to give.’
      give way, cave in, collapse, break, fall apart, come apart
      View synonyms
    2. 7.2North American informal no object Concede defeat; surrender.
      ‘I give!’
      • ‘‘Okay! I give!’ I squealed, ‘I'll help you!’’
      • ‘He gave me several chances to quit - "‘Do you give yet?" - but I flailed about, trying desperately to get out of his viselike grip.’
      • ‘‘All right. I give!’ He threw up his hands in defeat.’

noun

mass noun
  • 1Capacity to bend or alter in shape under pressure.

    ‘plastic pots that have enough give to accommodate the vigorous roots’
    • ‘When choosing them, look for those with a blotchy yellow or orange skin and with a slight give when pressed.’
    • ‘We are on this type of surface for the rest of the route and very nice it is too, a bit of give under the boots for comfort, and you do not have to watch your feet.’
    • ‘To perform good dressage, you want the ground to give you something back, a bit of give and bounce.’
    • ‘He felt the gentle give of the handcuffs beneath his expert hands and reigned in his emotions.’
    • ‘Thai fishcakes tend to have a foam-like quality: like padded cushions with a bit of a give.’
    elasticity, flexibility, stretch, stretchiness
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Ability to adapt; flexibility.
      ‘there is no give at all in the British position’
      • ‘How do you take risks, try new things, learn, and grow, when there's no give left in the system?’
      • ‘The market is vulnerable to any kind of shock or semi-shock because there is hardly any give in the supply.’
      • ‘There's very little give, I think, in a serious way on the part of the regime.’

Phrases

  • give oneself airs

    • Act pretentiously or snobbishly.

      • ‘When I describe the feeling it sometimes feels pretentious to use Buddhist metaphors, as though I'm trying to give myself airs.’
      • ‘She was not at all like Rebecca, who paraded herself about and gave herself airs.’
      • ‘My parents' relatives did not give themselves airs the way you do.’
      • ‘Perhaps if the girl gives herself airs of grandeur, we should encourage her in her ambitions to become the proper lady.’
      • ‘He gave himself airs so that others could more easily recognize his greatness.’
      • ‘Each one was a girl of fair common-sense, and she did not delude herself with any vain conceits, or dress herself up, or give herself airs, in the idea of outshining the others.’
      • ‘It was as if he was always wary of getting above himself, of giving himself airs and graces, a peculiarly Scottish trait.’
      • ‘For everyone, literally for everyone in Sursee, he is simply ‘the priest’, and we never feel that he is the kind of parish priest who gives himself airs.’
  • give and take

    • 1Mutual concessions and compromises.

      ‘there has to be give and take on both sides’
      • ‘A long marriage is down to give and take and making sure you have a good family around you.’
      • ‘But at the same time, he also added: ‘Reconciliation involves a bit of give and take on both sides.’’
      • ‘For its ease of interplay and generous spirit of give and take, the rapport between them is remarkable.’
      • ‘And don't you hope, John, that the spirit of give and take, the spirit of cooperation, will prevail in the coming days?’
      • ‘The relationship between IT and the rest of the business needs to be like a marriage with a good deal of mutual give and take.’
      • ‘The success of our marriage is based on give and take and we talk things through.’
      • ‘Asked what makes a strong marriage, Gwen said: ‘It's just give and take.’’
      • ‘I was merely illustrating the give and take, the reciprocation.’
      • ‘To me, that speaks of ideally how all relationships should be: groundedness and a sense of mutuality, of give and take.’
      • ‘Many of these ancient practices were not just for the sake of it, but were meant to be subtle reminders of the need for mutual give and take, besides sacrifices and adjustments, to ensure wedded bliss.’
      compromise, concession
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1as verbMake concessions and compromises.
        ‘children learn how to give and take from such experiences’
        • ‘Remember, in any relationship, both parties have to give and take and learn to accept things about each other, right?’
        • ‘They will soon learn that to give and take in the workplace and indeed, any relationship, reaps its own rewards.’
        • ‘In politics, you have to give and take and respect the views of others.’
        • ‘As to their recipe for a happy marriage, Gladys said: ‘You've just got to give and take.’’
        • ‘The most important thing in marriage is to give and take and to understand one another.’
  • give as good as one gets

    • Respond with equal force when attacked.

      ‘I don't like to get into confrontations but I give as good as I get’
      • ‘Do you think it would be fair to say that you're able to give as good as you get?’
      • ‘If you give as good as you get, everything will be okay.’
      • ‘You've probably had to fight for your rights all your life and will always give as good as you get.’
      • ‘Anne is just as nasty as she makes out but you have got to give as good as you get.’
      • ‘If you are sledged, and, trust me lads, it's going to happen, then give as good as you get.’
      • ‘You give as good as you get, which means that we have to retaliate.’
      • ‘They allow you to believe that you're giving as good as you get.’
      • ‘‘At first I was kind of offended by some of the things that were said, but then l realized you have to be able to give as good as you get on that show,’ says David.’
  • give the game (or show) away

    • Inadvertently reveal something secret.

      ‘to make sure he didn't give the game away I gave him a swift kick in the shin under the table’
      • ‘There is a particular shot in every trailer I've seen of this movie that gives the game away completely.’
      • ‘They gave the game away last year when the Government suggested church schools educate more children who are in care, and they recoiled in horror.’
      • ‘I'm sure their under contract not to give the show away with any clues.’
      • ‘His face showed that he had got into the sentence halfway and then realized he was giving the game away.’
      • ‘I'll not give the game away but lets just say a game of cat and mouse was had and the cat won it.’
      • ‘The picture's title gives the game away somewhat as to whether he makes it to safety or not, but there's a final surprise in store at the close.’
  • give it to someone

    • informal Scold or punish someone.

      ‘I'm gonna give it to you like my daddy gave it to me!’
      • ‘In the Bahamas when all sides are giving it to you, and the protests are loud and vociferous from the right, the left and the middle, chances are that you are doing something right.’
      • ‘I got the service department today and really gave it to them.’
      • ‘My father will give it to you if he finds me alive. I am his only daughter.’
      • ‘She was always giving it to him about the radishes and the vegetable skins in the garbage disposal.’
      • ‘A psychologist claimed the crimes were committed by kids whose parents didn't give it to them.’
      penalize, discipline, mete out punishment to, bring someone to book, teach someone a lesson, make an example of
      View synonyms
  • give me ——

    • I prefer or admire ——

      ‘give me the mainland any day!’
      • ‘Jazz is too intellectual, give me Elvis and his shaking hips any day.’
      • ‘I'm so sick of the city. Give me the coast and happiness anytime!’
      • ‘Give me the town over the country any day.’
  • give me a break

    • informal Used to express exasperation, protest, or disbelief.

      ‘give me a break—I just deliver the stuff’
      • ‘If I was getting completely ripped off then I might say, ‘Come on, give me a break’.’
      • ‘I am just trying to do my job, come on, give me a break.’
      • ‘I was twelve, give me a break. I didn't even speak English that well at that point.’
      • ‘Would any one genuinely expect serious electoral matters to be raised at a ‘works’ meeting? Come on, give me a break.’
  • give someone one

    • vulgar slang (of a man) have sexual intercourse with a woman.

  • give or take ——

    • 1informal To within a specified amount.

      ‘three hundred and fifty years ago, give or take a few’
      • ‘After doing that we discovered that a extinction event we think occurred 46,500 years ago, give or take a couple of thousand years.’
      • ‘He departed this vale two decades or so ago, give or take a few years.’
      • ‘In fact, I think you could probably watch this movie within about fifteen minutes, give or take thirty seconds.’
      • ‘Eight hours ago - give or take a couple minutes - his aunt had flown to California to visit an old roommate from her college years.’
      • ‘The deficit is about £200,000, give or take £20,000.’
      • ‘The standard indoor track is 200m long give or take 20m or so.’
      • ‘They found that the mass extinction occurred 46,400 years ago, give or take 3,000 years.’
      • ‘Which, give or take five minutes or so, is when we got there.’
      • ‘Although no one knows for certain, most authorities agree that the pug originated in China around 2,500 years ago, give or take a few centuries.’
      • ‘So that means that for every year we operate, the government debt grows by $200 million, give or take $30 million.’
      1. 1.1Apart from.
        ‘it's a process that runs fairly smoothly, give or take the occasional glitch’
        • ‘Six years ago he was about where he is now, give or take a law degree and the snappy suit.’
        • ‘That's the plot, give or take a few details.’
        • ‘Nothing too substantial can happen to them, either good or bad, so you know the novel will be left tied up in a neat package which leaves them roughly where they began, give or take a scar.’
        • ‘I spent almost my entire first 17 years, give or take a day out or the odd holiday, within a one mile radius of the house that's been our home for over 50 years.’
        • ‘I'm still essentially the same as I was 20 years ago, give or take a few stone - but there are some dodgy areas for women of my age.’
  • give rise to

    • Cause to happen.

      ‘decisions which give rise to arguments’
      • ‘Then, of course, two British helicopters crashed into one another, giving rise to more casualties.’
      • ‘Our defeat on those two fronts is giving rise to more violence.’
      • ‘Political maneuvers are not resorted to as they are believed to give rise to more problems.’
      • ‘I agree with you that the way it is expressed does give rise to two interpretations.’
      • ‘Many things can happen in a single study that can spuriously give rise to a positive result.’
      • ‘The inadequacy of the insulation may have caused condensation, giving rise to a risk of further outbreaks of dry rot.’
      • ‘Instead of giving rise to entirely new genes, evolution has in many cases simply borrowed old ones.’
      • ‘The sharp-witted reader will have seen the subtle problems this can give rise to.’
      • ‘Excessive claims, and many of them fraudulent, are giving rise to ever increasing premium costs.’
      • ‘The continuing stagnation of the economy is giving rise to more bad debts.’
      produce, bring about, cause, occasion, generate, engender, lead to, result in, effect, induce, initiate, start, set off
      View synonyms
  • give someone to understand (or believe or know)

    • Inform someone in a rather indirect way.

      ‘I was given to understand that I had been invited’
      • ‘Once upon a time we were given to believe that the growth and exposure at the top tier of any sport would impact favourably on the lower levels’
      • ‘Apparently, earning more money is also not the solution, because the more you earn, I am given to believe, the more extravagant your lifestyle becomes and the nature of your expenses increases proportionally.’
      • ‘Certainly we were given to believe in the first place that information received was not passed on.’
      • ‘At the end of December I was given to understand that my contract would be renewed for a further five years.’
      • ‘A little corruption, we are given to understand, can creep into even the loftiest humanitarian endeavors.’
      • ‘I have been given to understand that a proper management plan will be put in place and that the grubby, uncared-for appearance will shortly be a thing of the past.’
      • ‘At the time of the story we are given to understand that she is only lately separated from her husband.’
      • ‘It goes on general release, we are given to believe, at the end of the year.’
      • ‘But all these people, we are given to understand, have suffered in their own ways.’
      • ‘Next time, we were given to understand, the same policies would be adopted.’
      imply, insinuate, intimate, suggest, indicate, signal, whisper, give a clue, give an inkling, let it be known, allude to the fact, make a reference to the fact, refer to the fact, give someone to understand, give someone to believe
      View synonyms
  • give up the ghost

    • 1Die.

      • ‘The tulips almost got to flowering but then seemed to give up the ghost, go pale and slowly fall over.’
      • ‘The tree lasted until March and then suddenly, inexplicably, gave up the ghost (and the majority of its needles) and expired.’
      die, lose one's life, be killed, fall, expire, meet one's death, be lost, lay down one's life, breathe one's last, draw one's last breath, pass away, go the way of all flesh, give up the ghost, go to glory, meet one's maker, go to one's last resting place, cross the great divide
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1(of a machine) stop working.
        • ‘My faithful tumble dryer is giving up the ghost, and its sad death rattles are breaking my purse.’
        • ‘As if all of this weren't enough, my coffee machine gave up the ghost yesterday.’
        • ‘With impeccable timing my sewing machine has chosen now to give up the ghost.’
        • ‘For example, they can look after you when an unexpected car repair bill crops up or when your washing machine finally decides to give up the ghost after fifteen years of loyal and faithful service.’
        • ‘It took us the best part of five hours just to reach Birmingham, and by the time we'd reached the Scottish border, the car was screaming for mercy and the battery was giving up the ghost.’
        • ‘On Monday of last week, the ailing machine gave up the ghost leaving the hospital without the capacity to carry out even the most basic diagnostic tests.’
        • ‘Yesterday Dave's PC gave up the ghost and just crashed - no power, no response from the on/off button, nothing wrong with the external power supply or cable.’
        • ‘If your washing machine gives up the ghost after two years and has been subject to normal use, you're entitled to a free repair.’
        • ‘Having queued for 45 minutes to get money, the three bank machines each give up the ghost.’
        • ‘You know the sort of thing: you lose your job; the boiler gives up the ghost; your car breaks down; a huge bill arrives; and so on.’
        break down, break, stop working, cease to function, cut out, stop, stall, crash, give out
        View synonyms
  • give someone what for

    • informal Punish or scold someone severely.

      ‘wait till your father hears you were in trouble—he'll give you what for’
      • ‘We gave them what for, and we can resume our action at any time.’
      • ‘One of this days I am gonna turn around and give you what for.’
      • ‘The once quiet little girl who was mercilessly bullied at her last school was giving them what for.’
      • ‘Uri stepped in (it had been a bad afternoon for the poor guy) and gave him what for as well.’
      • ‘In Joe's office Elizabeth was giving him what for.’
      • ‘It's all I can do to keep myself from going over there and giving them what for.’
      • ‘I gave him what for and told him he better not miss the funeral!’
      • ‘You'd best be on your best behaviour or the locals will give you what for.’
      • ‘Safely out of earshot at the far edge of the crowd, I gave her what for.’
      • ‘Once, the cat got too close and she gave him what for.’
      scold, chastise, upbraid, berate, castigate, lambaste, rebuke, reprimand, reproach, reprove, admonish, remonstrate with, lecture, criticize, censure
      View synonyms
  • what gives?

    • informal What's the news?; what's happening? (often used as a friendly greeting).

      • ‘It's been two years since I've seen you, what gives?’
      • ‘That's three days in a row you've worn your dress blues, what gives?’
      • ‘But now she's making out with someone else… what gives?’
      • ‘Hey man, what gives? What's your secret, you know, with the ladies?’
      • ‘Something's got you on Cloud Nine and I know it's not having to come in to work on a Saturday, so what gives?’

Phrasal Verbs

  • give someone away

    • 1Reveal the true identity of someone.

      ‘his strangely shaped feet gave him away’
      • ‘I saw Jude stride in through the front door. His walk gave him away immediately.’
      • ‘It was too dark for him to see his attacker, but her voice gave her away.’
      1. 1.1Reveal information which incriminates someone.
        ‘I won't give you away’
        • ‘He has his poker face on, only the wriggling of his foot could give him away.’
        • ‘Wilhelm looked down at his feet so his smile wouldn't give him away.’
        • ‘A security tag embedded in the movie identified its origins and gave him away.’
        • ‘For years to come he might still be chasing after Rebecca and Rachel to try and stop them from giving him away to the police.’
        • ‘I smiled, hoping my expression wasn't giving me away.’
        • ‘Adam's unconscious body language was giving him away even if his face wasn't.’
        • ‘I don't think there's any chance he'd want to take the risk of me giving him away.’
        • ‘Her eyes gave her away, betrayed what she really felt.’
        • ‘Kaleb quickly checked for any incriminating things that might give him away.’
        • ‘I have been known to have a rather poor ability to hide my true feelings about situations because my facial gestures often give me away.’
        betray, inform on
        View synonyms
    • 2Hand over a bride ceremonially to her bridegroom as part of a wedding ceremony.

      • ‘Jane admits the man who gave her away at their wedding wasn't her father, but a paid actor.’
      • ‘She was too young and her mother was bed-ridden with arthritis, so the ceremony of giving her away as a bride was delayed.’
      • ‘Then her husband gave me away at my wedding to Tony, as my own father was too ill.’
      • ‘It began as nothing more than the transfer of property from one man to another, a tradition that is nostalgically recalled when the father leads the bride down the aisle in order to give her away to the groom.’
      • ‘The mayor promised the firefighter's sister, Diane - who had also lost a grandfather and her father in the past year - that he would stand in for Michael and give her away at her wedding.’
      • ‘She will be cheered on by husband Christopher, who she married in February, and her mum Margaret, who gave her away on her wedding day.’
      • ‘I want you to attend my wedding so that daddy can give me away.’
      • ‘Their visions of a big white wedding in the local parish church, with my father proudly giving me away and my mother wearing her fox fur over a powder blue crepe dress were now being blown sky high.’
      • ‘First of all he accompanied the blushing bride down the aisle to give her away and later that day called on his mam and dad to cut their wedding cake.’
      • ‘The bride told her dad she wanted him to give her away on her big day.’
  • give something away

    • 1Reveal something secret.

      ‘he gave away naval secrets’
      • ‘I felt bad for giving the secret away in case he was uncomfortable with sharing, but at least his mother and my aunt understood…’
      • ‘One reason might be because I quite enjoy writing this column and don't want to give my secrets away all at once.’
      • ‘Mr Atkinson wasn't giving any secrets away but advised: ‘If you get your ingredients right in the first place and put them together properly you are on to a winner.’’
      • ‘Without giving any secrets away or anticipating the future, do you see the current structure continuing when the two organisations come together in 2005?’
      • ‘The Prince asked Mrs Throup about the secret recipe but she told him: ‘I'm afraid we never give our secrets away.’’
      • ‘Beth cut him off before he could give their secret away.’
      • ‘They gave things away, told secrets like a six year old everyone is constantly trying to shut up.’
      • ‘I'm not going to give our game-plan away but we are going to be ready for a big, tough encounter.’
      • ‘I don't want to give it away, it's a trade secret, but beeswax is good,’ said Peter.’
      • ‘No secrets or details will be given away - simply because the act of initiation is an individual and deeply personal experience.’
      reveal, disclose, divulge, let slip, leak, let out
      View synonyms
    • 2(in sport) concede a goal or advantage to the opposition, especially through careless play.

      ‘the goal we gave away was a bit sloppy’
      • ‘We just cannot give goals away like we did in the first-half.’
      • ‘‘We scored two goals again but we keep giving goals away,’ he said.’
      • ‘We can't afford to give penalties away and we need to make sure we keep our composure during the game like we have done before.’
      • ‘They work hard for each other and don't give many goals away.’
      • ‘They will give the ball away at times, concede ground and, more importantly, concede goals.’
      • ‘We took the lead through a penalty and the lad who gave the penalty away was lucky not to have been sent off.’
      • ‘I was quite cross about the goal because we gave the ball away in the corner.’
      • ‘In the space of 20 seconds he gives the ball away carelessly twice.’
      • ‘We gave a bad goal away minutes before half-time and ended up chasing the game in the second half.’
      • ‘We can't keep giving silly goals away like we are at present.’
    • 3Stop doing something.

      ‘he'd given away some of the things he got up to’
      • ‘The doctors told him to give up cigarettes and told him also to give the grog away.’
      • ‘He's hoping his mother and sister will also give the smokes away.’
      • ‘The show is such a part of my life, and I can't see myself giving it away anytime soon.’
      • ‘If you really want to be a singer then give the smokes away now.’
      abstain, refrain, forbear, hold back, keep
      View synonyms
  • give in

    • Cease fighting or arguing; admit defeat.

      ‘he reluctantly gave in to the pressure’
      • ‘She hated her father for leaving, for giving in to the disease when he should have fought it.’
      • ‘That would be like giving in to a child's tantrum - an easy but wrong option.’
      • ‘She is a lover of life, and she is not going to give in without a fight.’
      • ‘Not wanting to give in, the Myers fought against the notice and even defended themselves at an appeal.’
      • ‘Usually she gets so sulky and difficult I end up giving in, just to keep the peace.’
      • ‘Fortunately for my waistline, I haven't been giving in to the temptation.’
      • ‘I think they're willing to make some unpopular decisions, instead of just giving in.’
      • ‘Protesters are planning two days of disruption this week to blockade roads, oil refineries and petrol depots unless the government gives in to their demand to cut fuel duty.’
      • ‘‘She's a battler and a fighter and she never gives in,’ said her son, Geoffrey.’
      • ‘Did you succeed by fighting your fate or by giving in to it?’
      capitulate, admit defeat, concede defeat, give up, surrender, yield, submit, climb down, back down, give way, defer, acquiesce, relent, succumb, comply
      View synonyms
  • give something in

    • Hand in a completed document to an official or a piece of work to a supervisor.

      • ‘Stay aboard, while the pilot's helper carries identification papers up to the shack to be officially stamped - and don't fail to give your papers in.’
      • ‘I gave my essay in on time and went to sit in the medical school coffee shop.’
      • ‘We gave in our documents some time ago.’
  • give on to (or into)

    • (of a window, door, corridor, etc.) overlook or lead into.

      ‘a plate glass window gave on to the roof’
      • ‘A glass door gives on to a roomful of fruit and vegetables.’
      • ‘Two large glass doors give on to the north and south park.’
      • ‘Doors give into the upper aft deck with its large round table, offering an alternative dining area.’
      • ‘The bedroom windows give into a quiet back-end street.’
  • give out

    • 1Be completely used up.

      ‘their allowances soon gave out’
      • ‘The remote control batteries then gave out as soon as the machine entered the arena.’
      • ‘As he got there his energy reserves finally gave out and both legs failed and he fell, head first into the side of the car as he fell heavily beside it.’
      • ‘The money soon gave out and the proposed improvement had to be abandoned.’
      • ‘The food gave out the first day, and the dreadful cold was rendered more intense by the pangs of hunger.’
      • ‘All went well with the family until about the middle of December, then the supplies gave out.’
      run out, be used up, be consumed, be exhausted, be depleted, come to an end, fail, flag
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Stop functioning.
        ‘he curses and swears till his voice gives out’
        • ‘After, passing about ten doors, what seemed like forever, and when her legs were about to give out on her, they stopped at another door.’
        • ‘His body began to give out, and soon he found himself unconscious again.’
        • ‘You've noticed that your back and chest workouts suffer because your arms give out too soon.’
        • ‘He'll stop when his liver gives out or when he gets sick of being hungover.’
        • ‘His voice gave out on the final syllable, his distressed croak fading abruptly into an almost inaudible squeak.’
        • ‘He has always said that he started conducting in order to have something to do when his voice gave out, and his efforts on the podium are characteristically conscientious.’
        • ‘No wonder his heart eventually gave out, soon after his greatest electoral triumph in 1905.’
        • ‘Fearing his memory may soon give out - although there is little sign of that - Mr Vickers, 89, decided to write down his memories of childhood.’
        • ‘He continued jogging down the path, but his aching legs soon gave out again.’
        • ‘Hope you have loads of fun and your back doesn't give out too soon.’
    • 2Speak in an angry way.

      ‘the woman began giving out to poor Paddy’
      • ‘Now, people are giving out about those that drive too slow.’
      • ‘Now the same deputies were giving out about cutbacks in administration.’
      • ‘Tempers begin to flare and we all start giving out to the security lady.’
      • ‘Some of the people I encountered there were giving out, claiming that it took about seven hours to get from Dublin by car.’
      • ‘Some people write letters to the papers and go on radio giving out about how ‘shocked’ they are that this is happening.’
  • give something out

    • Distribute or broadcast something.

      ‘I've been giving out leaflets’
      • ‘The council and emergency services formed a flood co-ordination group to prevent problems and sandbags were given out to householders.’
      • ‘Backpacks loaded with wool socks, winter clothing and survival kits will be given out, and there will be information about nutrition and local services.’
      • ‘Registration forms will be given out on the day and should be returned the following Sunday.’
      • ‘In an effort to encourage students to run or walk this course, one hundred T-shirts were given out as prizes.’
      • ‘I've thought of printing some little leaflets out, to give them out to people.’
      • ‘Over 30,000 questionnaires will be given out in 343 public libraries in every part of the country over the next few weeks.’
      • ‘Overall, 178 passports were given out under the scheme, including 71 for spouses and children.’
      • ‘We tested 1,500 people and 1,300 pairs of spectacles were given out.’
      • ‘Over 16,000 leaflets were given out to the public on the strike days.’
      • ‘Fans had to apply for tickets for the free concert, but all the publicly allocated tickets have been given out.’
      • ‘Entry forms were given out in the schools, but if you have mislaid yours, you can obtain one at the Parish Centre, or from any of the shops in the town.’
      announce, declare, state, make known, notify, give notice, communicate, broadcast, report, publish
      distribute, issue, hand out, pass round, dole out, dispense
      View synonyms
  • give over

    • 1Stop doing something.

      ‘‘Give over, will you!’ she shouted’
      • ‘Just give over, stop moaning and if it's that bad don't go back.’
      • ‘Give over, will you? You’re driving me crazy!’
      1. 1.1Used to express vehement disagreement.
        ‘I suggested her salary might be £100,000. ‘Give over!’’
        • ‘Act your age? Give over, that's never going to happen.’
        • ‘Oh give over - that's exactly what you're doing.’
  • give up

    • Cease making an effort; admit defeat.

      ‘he wasn't the kind of man to give up easily’
      • ‘So we drove around the oval for a while before giving up and making a call to the restaurant.’
      • ‘England is famous for never giving up so why should we do it after a draw against Sweden?’
      • ‘I did think about giving up all together, but what little writing I do now focuses the mind.’
      • ‘Right now, giving up, and not throwing any money away, looks like the wiser option.’
      • ‘It's not like you to give up so easily on an assignment so early after starting school.’
      • ‘She says that it would be impossible to give up now after all the money and the effort.’
      • ‘I see the same spirit in my daughter and now because of her there is no question of giving up.’
      • ‘They may have a setback with a third of the group leaving, but they showed no signs of giving up.’
      • ‘As long as I don't think about it as giving up, it doesn't seem to be a problem.’
      • ‘Club members are bitter about the council's treatment but they are not giving up.’
      admit defeat, concede defeat, stop trying, call it a day, give in, surrender, capitulate, be beaten
      View synonyms
  • give it up

    • usually in imperativeApplaud a performer or entertainer.

      • ‘Let's give it up for the new couple!’
      • ‘He then told the responsive crowd to give it up for each of the other acts, which they happily did.’
      • ‘Ladies and Gentlemen, give it up for Kimberly.’
      • ‘we had our best show ever, and the crowd really gave it up.’
      • ‘They took the field with such poise, and the crowd gave it up to them.’
      applaud, clap one's hands, give someone a round of applause, put one's hands together
      View synonyms
  • give oneself up (or over) to

    • Allow oneself to be taken over by (an emotion or addiction)

      ‘he gave himself up to pleasure’
      • ‘Not to be insensitive, but I've known various alcoholics and addicts, and it does take a certain kind of determination and willpower to give yourself over to a drug so completely.’
      • ‘At that she gave a small laugh before giving herself over to the tears that had wanted to come out since she left the campsite.’
      • ‘Needless to say, life for the army came to a full stop as Alexander gave himself over to grief.’
      • ‘The rich gave themselves over to the most excessive indulgence and the poor knew no other desire than to be able to participate, ever so modestly, in that indulgence.’
      • ‘He projected an alert, melancholy, insolent intelligence, but gave himself over to laziness, to lust and stupidity with alarming readiness, as if just for the sake of having something to do.’
      • ‘If she gives herself over to anger, to sloth, to covetousness, or envy, the father sees nothing.’
      • ‘She had tried so hard to give herself over to the love she thought she had for Keenan, being as selfless as she knew how.’
      • ‘She wound her hands in his hair, felt his lips rapidly warming to the temperature of her own blood, and stopped thinking, giving herself over to feelings entirely.’
      • ‘She falls madly in love with that small, wiry painter hired by her husband to paint their portraits and gives herself over to a reckless passion that destroys the life she has led until then.’
      • ‘Like a schoolboy disappointed in love, he gave himself over to mental violence.’
      luxuriate, bask, take pleasure, take satisfaction, indulge, indulge oneself, delight, revel, glory
      View synonyms
  • give someone up

    • 1Deliver a wanted person to authority.

      ‘a voice told him to come out and give himself up’
      • ‘James decides to give himself up and is brought before the court system.’
      • ‘She took the knife used for peeling fruit that she had carried out of the kitchen and stabbed him before running downstairs to give herself up at the police station.’
      • ‘I suggest you give yourself up now, the punishment will be more lenient if you do.’
      • ‘Police had been trying for two days to persuade Carl Roland to give himself up.’
      • ‘Only the next morning, with armed troops surrounding the palace of justice, did the two give themselves up.’
    • 2Stop hoping that someone is still going to arrive.

      ‘oh, it's you—we'd almost given you up’
      • ‘Mrs General complained of a headache, and of being fatigued; and so, when we gave you up, she went to bed, dear.’
      • ‘Thank God you're O.K. - we'd given you up.’
      • ‘I was about to give you up and go to bed.’
  • give something up

    • 1Part with something that one would prefer to keep.

      ‘they have given up everything for their son’
      • ‘In both cases the love was more fully expressed because it involved a sacrifice - in the first story a treasured possession was given up, in the second it was a sacrifice of time and warmth.’
      • ‘I would end up giving up everything just to bring that child into the world.’
      • ‘If I lost any of these volumes I could certainly buy new copies, but to give them up altogether - to pack them in boxes and haul them down to the used bookstore for whatever cash they might bring - that is unthinkable.’
      • ‘‘For most ladies giving their child up for adoption is the biggest sacrifice you can make,’ Hielema said.’
      • ‘She enters into a pact with a doctor who helps her deliver the baby and give it up for adoption.’
      • ‘Health funding is under pressure, and some people are going to have to give things up in order that we can deliver on NHS commitments.’
      • ‘I too was an unmarried mother in the Sixties, giving up my baby girl for adoption.’
      • ‘Since they have been friends of ours for such a long time, it is very hard to abandon or give them up immediately.’
      1. 1.1Stop doing or consuming something.
        ‘I've decided to give up drinking’
        • ‘Keep reminding yourself of the health and other benefits of giving up smoking.’
        • ‘If a patient has cardiovascular illness then giving up smoking is the best thing they could do.’
        • ‘Danny is giving up alcohol for the whole of this year, and is being joined by a host of celebrities for a day each.’
        • ‘There are thousands of people who love their drink, and who wouldn't give it up for anything.’
        • ‘Getting rid of the sugar addresses Jacobson's most credible concerns about soft drinks without forcing people to give them up completely.’
        • ‘Debbie likes a drink with dinner and I like several after dinner so we've decided to give it up during the week.’
        • ‘In terms of giving up smoking you have got to have a longer term strategy.’
        • ‘The evidence shows that giving up smoking can improve your health, no matter how old you are.’
        • ‘At this point, Williams was on verge of giving up acting and following the rest of her family into law.’
        • ‘The event encourages smokers to kick the habit for 24 hours in hopes they'll give it up for good.’
        stop, cease, discontinue, desist from, swear off, forbear from, abstain from, cut out, renounce, forswear, forgo, abandon, have done with
        View synonyms
  • give up on

    • Stop having faith or belief in.

      ‘they weren't about to give up on their heroes so easily’
      • ‘We must not give up on what many know in their hearts is the right thing to do.’
      • ‘My mom was angry at the staff for giving up on me, and she was beyond desperate.’
      • ‘Is it time for me to give up on what I've learned about how a wedding should be performed?’
      • ‘In the meantime, Dave just kept plugging away, never losing faith in his ability or giving up on his music.’
      • ‘Thank you so much once again for not giving up on her.’
      • ‘I or most people don't have a problem with peaceful co-existence but that cannot be on the basis of not telling the truth or giving up on our own values.’
      • ‘Just like giving up on Santa Claus being real, none of us really believe the media is objective anymore, do we?’
      • ‘He didn't totally give up on the concept of faith though, he just reinterpreted.’
      • ‘People may eventually give up on sovereign statehood and abandon the institution.’
      • ‘You are giving up on the possibility of things changing.’

Origin

Old English giefan, gefan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch geven and German geben.

Pronunciation

give

/ɡɪv/