Definition of gimmick in English:

gimmick

noun

  • A trick or device intended to attract attention, publicity, or trade:

    ‘it is not so much a programme to improve services as a gimmick to gain votes’
    ‘sales gimmicks such as free trips’
    ‘it's foolish to dismiss it as nothing more than a gimmick’
    ‘a fund-raising gimmick’
    • ‘He challenged the Government to reveal the full cost to taxpayers of what he termed a publicity gimmick.’
    • ‘Candidates also promote online games and gimmicks to enhance fund-raising activities on their sites.’
    • ‘He denied the scheme was a gimmick which would have little effect on the rocketing street crime problem.’
    • ‘When choosing a children's savings account, ignore the gimmicks, free gifts and advertising featuring cartoon characters or celebrities.’
    • ‘This is mainly a fund-raising gimmick for a couple of right of center interest groups.’
    • ‘However, many journalists and others were almost certain that it was a publicity-seeking gimmick.’
    • ‘Product innovations, and not short-term gimmicks should be used as devices to improve bottomlines.’
    • ‘Critics have wasted no time dismissing the scheme as a gimmick or proof that the government have run out of ideas.’
    • ‘It is more like a sales gimmick which targets the poor and uneducated.’
    • ‘They are glossy, glib and trot out all the gimmicks and tricks to catch your attention - and are pointless as anything other than that.’
    • ‘His stubborn puritanical simplicity was sometimes dismissed as a publicity gimmick.’
    • ‘But it is also overcooked and frenetic, with some visual tricks and gimmicks repeated often enough to induce a diminishing return of novelty and effect.’
    • ‘It doesn't need gimmicks to attract youth, it needs excellence and, in particular, it needs excellence at international level.’
    • ‘Colourful stickers, festoons, bargain deals and a whole range of sales gimmicks are employed to lure customers.’
    • ‘A traveling showman added a gimmick to his sales by vending cards through machines.’
    • ‘It seems a contrivance, a gimmick designed to get attention, which it does.’
    • ‘At children's parties you have acts like magicians and balloon-benders; at adult parties you have gimmicks to hold the guests' attention.’
    • ‘These actors forge a nice bridge between the two shows and their appearances never feel like gimmicks or stunt casting.’
    • ‘People have talked dismissively of gimmicks but these gimmicks are going down well in my constituency.’
    • ‘No tricks, no gimmicks, no unpleasant taste in your mouth the next morning.’
    publicity device, stunt, contrivance, eye-catching novelty, scheme, trick, dodge, ploy, stratagem
    loss-leader
    shtick
    View synonyms

Origin

1920s (originally US): of unknown origin but possibly an approximate anagram of magic, the original sense being ‘a piece of magicians' apparatus’.

Pronunciation:

gimmick

/ˈɡɪmɪk/