Main definitions of gig in English

: gig1gig2gig3gig4

gig1

noun

  • 1historical A light two-wheeled carriage pulled by one horse.

    • ‘During the war we had a gig with a cart horse and used to bowl along around the north-west end of town - great transport when petrol was rationed.’
    • ‘On one occasion the Archdeacon conducted a service on the verandah and the neighbours arrived for this in gigs, on horseback and in cars.’
    • ‘Luckily for him, her carriage was an open gig, and she had no trouble hearing him above the crickets and the wind.’
    • ‘The doctor persisted with the cantankerous little car, but admitted that if he had an urgent medical case to visit he would take a horse drawn gig rather than risk a break down.’
    • ‘The four horse drawn gigs will be in Dungarvan on July 9 and travelling from Cappoquin to Fermoy on July 10.’
    wagon, hackney, hansom, gig, landau, trap, caravan, car
    View synonyms
  • 2A light, fast, narrow boat adapted for rowing or sailing.

    • ‘An hour or two later, the ferry tows the gigs home.’
    • ‘The new gig should be out of the builders by April next year, giving plenty of time to think of a name.’

Origin

Late 18th century: apparently a transferred sense of obsolete gig ‘a flighty girl’, which was also applied to various objects or devices that whirled.

Pronunciation:

gig

/ɡɪɡ/

Main definitions of gig in English

: gig1gig2gig3gig4

gig2

noun

informal
  • 1A live performance by a musician or group playing popular or jazz music.

    • ‘Imagine being a successful Jazz musician playing gigs on the road, performing in the Big Apple's coolest clubs and even under the stage lights of Broadway.’
    • ‘As someone in the audience told me, it was light years away from their previous gigs.’
    • ‘Tickets are $25 and being a one-off gig they will sell fast.’
    • ‘A music-making course at Wiltshire Music Centre gave youngsters the chance to perform a live gig.’
    • ‘This not-to-be-missed gig on November 6 at 8.30 pm is a welcome highlight for all fans of traditional music and live gigs.’
    • ‘She is jetting about all over the place, flitting between jazz gigs, gospel recitals, disco dates and dance shows.’
    • ‘They started the band and became more popular with their live gigs.’
    • ‘It is worth remembering, though, that this was a debut gig, and mistakes can be fine tuned with time.’
    • ‘With more practice, a few bigger gigs and an active dance floor, there is potential.’
    • ‘I'd venture into London, and my dad would take me to a rock gig or a jazz gig.’
    • ‘So as a big tease he made a debut gig tonight and promptly broke up his band.’
    • ‘This is a unique gig and tickets will no doubt sell out fast.’
    • ‘We're so big now that I just kind of get ferried to gigs and told to play.’
    • ‘With sell-out gigs of their own and festival appearances, this year must have worked out better than they could have hoped for.’
    • ‘For a start, when was the last time you saw a Spanish guitar at a hip-hop gig?’
    • ‘A gig is a gig if it's in front of 60 people or 6,000 people.’
    • ‘At the end of the gig, when the lights came back on, the people who'd been standing next to us turned to us and said how nice it was to see people really getting into the music.’
    • ‘I also did quite a lot of gigs with different set-ups and I always had to re-arrange the music again for these gigs, which takes a lot of time.’
    • ‘She had retreated to the island after a fast and furious year of travel and gigs.’
    • ‘It was last year that the boys played all-out big gigs in front of sell-out crowds.’
    1. 1.1A job, especially one that is temporary or that has an uncertain future.
      ‘working on the sea and spotting whales seemed like a great gig’
      • ‘Feature writing is the easiest gig in the business, if you ask me.’
      • ‘I had been walking home from a babysitting gig at my friend Rosaline's house when he nearly ran me down.’
      • ‘While she works as an ESL teacher, she is getting closer to making writing her full-time gig.’
      • ‘Why not roll up your sleeves and snap up those lucrative implementation gigs?’
      • ‘Last year, I was living in Chicago and looking for a third job to supplement my freelance writing and catering gigs.’
      • ‘After I get writing gigs, I try to take care of them as soon as I can.’
      • ‘Anyway, with my current search for freelancing gigs I was thinking about how much a freelancer needs to charge per day to equal certain full-time salaries.’
      • ‘This job is in addition to his semi-regular gig writing record and concert reviews for the local weekly, the Other Paper.’
      • ‘He now does regular gigs for writing groups in Fleetwood.’
      • ‘At this point, I can't think of a job I'd like more than a writing gig.’
      • ‘Anna originally turned down the writing gig but reconsidered after learning that some people had the wrong impression of her.’
      • ‘In any event, it couldn't have helped me, and I continue to pay the rent with menial office work and a few freelance writing gigs.’
      • ‘That might be an even tougher assignment than his international gig.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]informal
  • 1 Perform a gig or gigs.

    ‘two or three nights a week we were gigging’
    • ‘The band began to gig around London and gain a loyal cult following.’
    • ‘The band gigged around the city until they were discovered by a local Liverpuddlian label, Honey Records.’
    • ‘That, my friends, could be the album's only fatal flaw - they've been gigging solidly with these songs, and when the album's released they'll be gigging with them again.’
    • ‘Our cousin sang back-up for Smokey so we got to see them every year when they gigged in town.’
    • ‘In fact, the band carried on recording and gigging until 2000.’
    • ‘The band has gigged constantly ever since.’
    • ‘She spent the rest of the autumn in New York and New Orleans gigging and writing for her third album.’
    • ‘We gigged for about two years adding and taking away another couple of guitarists.’
    • ‘In no time at all we were gigging and the fun began!’
    • ‘Next year we'll be gigging and writing as much as possible.’
    • ‘Tonight, as well has playing with a new drummer that they've never gigged with, the singer isn't in the best of health due to having Shingles.’
    • ‘For a long time, they have gigged extensively but never had a definite cutting edge to their sound.’
    • ‘She is currently putting a group together and gigging around Dublin with the intention of making it as a singer and dancer in the United States.’
    • ‘After a year gigging all over Europe they descended into the studio returning with the finest progressive rock album of this millennium.’
    • ‘Evidently, from the tight togetherness of the playing here, these were accomplished show bands used to endlessly gigging.’
    • ‘We plan to gig as much as we can and hopefully get an album released, we have enough material.’
    • ‘Year 2000, and we've just been joined by an extra guitarist who will be gigging with us soon and we're currently working on our new album.’
    • ‘It was the 60s, and like The Beatles, he gigged in Liverpool and Hamburg.’
    • ‘Livewise, we are gigging almost all the time, and we will let you know all dates as they are confirmed, here's what we have so far.’
    • ‘‘We want to gig at stag parties and weddings and water parks,’ he insists.’
    1. 1.1[with object]Use (a piece of musical equipment) at a gig.
      ‘12-string guitar, mint condition, never gigged’

Origin

1920s: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

gig

/ɡɪɡ/

Main definitions of gig in English

: gig1gig2gig3gig4

gig3

noun

  • A harpoon-like weapon used for catching fish.

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Fish using a gig.

Origin

Early 18th century: shortening of earlier (rarely used) fizgig, probably from Spanish fisga harpoon.

Pronunciation:

gig

/ɡɪɡ/

Main definitions of gig in English

: gig1gig2gig3gig4

gig4

noun

Computing
informal
  • ‘over 9 gigs of programs for the PC’
    short for gigabyte
    • ‘The user was cut off after downloading 150 gigs this month.’
    • ‘The good news is, you get an extra gig of data download to watch this.’
    • ‘As part of the upgrade, their usage limit will increase from 30 gig to 75 gig a month.’
    • ‘In an entire month, this web site might use up 60 gigs in bandwidth - although unlikely.’
    • ‘Of course, if you're down to your last few gigs, you probably should buy a new drive.’

Pronunciation:

gig

/dʒɪɡ/