Definition of get (or be) in on the act in English:

get (or be) in on the act

phrase

informal
  • Become (or be) involved in a particular activity, in order to gain an advantage.

    ‘many German breeders want to get in on the act’
    • ‘And libraries have also been getting in on the act with book quizzes and other activities to help youngsters experience the magic of reading.’
    • ‘He saw that direct banking was the future and he thought it essential that the company was in on the act.’
    • ‘Even the Prime Minister got in on the act, telling the band that the country had never wanted them to come and hoped they would never come back.’
    • ‘The Mayor, who originally hails from the village, got in on the act also and entertained those present with a few stories.’
    • ‘Women got in on the act as well, becoming standard bearers for their gender and icons to a generation.’
    • ‘With the game well in hand, a pair of freshmen got in on the act as safety Zurisko and defensive end Figore scored defensive touchdowns in the fourth quarter at Veterans Memorial Field.’
    • ‘Britney, Madonna, All Saints and other girlie bands and magazines then got in on the act and a new tradition was born.’
    • ‘One member said: ‘He has not got involved at all with this and just wants to get in on the act for publicity purposes to make it look as though he has helped resolve it.’’
    • ‘While developers sold bad deals to interstate investors who didn't know Gold Coast values, locals who did know got in on the act.’
    • ‘Liam got in on the act, naturally, and made it 4-0 at half time.’
    • ‘The teachers also got in on the act, with Cruella De Ville, Captain Hook and the Wicked Stepsisters taking lessons for the day.’
    • ‘Even the BBC got in on the act, with a beautifully cheeky gloating graphic that caused more than a few double-takes.’
    • ‘The English aristocracy got in on the act during the Tudor period when a three-storey treehouse and banqueting hall was built in the branches of a linden tree at Cobham Hall in Kent.’
    • ‘The third-level institutions also got in on the act, signing the bilateral agreements that are worth an estimated €31.4 million to the Irish economy.’
    • ‘Cole and opposite number Hughes exchanged penalties before Parsons got in on the act again to give his side a 23-3 half-time lead.’
    • ‘His parents were acrobats in vaudeville, and by the time he was three, Buster was in on the act.’
    • ‘Angry shareholders have also got in on the act - the company is facing potential class-action law suits in America and strong pressure to change its unique corporate-governance structure.’
    • ‘The prosecutor-general's office, charged under the constitution with ensuring observance of the law in Russia, got in on the act by introducing a number of amendments to the criminal code.’
    • ‘Nevermind that newspapers got in on the act of turning unsubstantiated gossip into an art form, long before TV, radio and the Internet were around.’
    • ‘This reporter got in on the act by showing the new and improved card that's less susceptible to forgery.’