noun

rare, historical
  • Roman type, especially the small roman type typically used in pocket editions of the Geneva Bible, such as were commonly and characteristically carried by English Puritans and members of separatist congregations opposed to the episcopal government of the Church of England; (allusively) Puritanism; anti-episcopal Reformed Protestantism generally.

Origin

Early 17th century; earliest use found in George Chapman (?1560–1634), poet and playwright. From the name of Geneva + print. In sense 1b punning on genever.

Pronunciation

Geneva print

/dʒɪˈniːvə ˌprɪnt/