Definition of generalship in English:

generalship

noun

  • [mass noun] The skill or practice of exercising military command.

    • ‘Do make it clear that generalship, at least in my case, came not by instinct, unsought, but by understanding, hard study and brain-concentration.’
    • ‘It was the goal of generalship after the Wars of Napoleon.’
    • ‘Then in 1810 he became war minister and immediately began to strengthen the army; he wrote a manual of generalship, tightened army organization, built strong points, and supervised a doubling in size.’
    • ‘He was a great loss to the British army, less for his generalship than for his skill in raising and training light troops.’
    • ‘To their credit, however, both authors take a more critical analysis in assessing his generalship during the Ardennes campaign.’
    • ‘Collectively, it is a memorial to Grant's generalship and also a memorial to the troops he commanded.’
    • ‘But there is another trait crucial to good generalship: selflessness.’
    • ‘He has given us a superb study in presidential leadership and military generalship.’
    • ‘But he proved equal to the task of avoiding encirclement and destruction, and in February 1943 he was promoted field marshal as a reward for his generalship.’
    • ‘He is an expert historiographer, making this book an outstanding addition to studies of generalship in the Civil War's final campaigns.’
    • ‘Commanders like Napoleon possessed generalship; they embraced new tactics or technology and could see results of an intended action before it was executed.’
    • ‘It seems odd that some historians appear willing to dismiss him as merely a good politician, rather than recognizing that it is this attribute that marks the acme of generalship in coalition warfare.’
    • ‘In practice, his generalship displayed far greater flexibility than he ever acknowledged.’
    • ‘If this is an accurate report of the man's thinking on generalship, this reader can find little fault with it.’
    • ‘Throughout the history of our profession, intense professional study has been one of the essential tools soldiers have used to advance their military art, and their generalship.’
    • ‘His 1993 book was a study in generalship, examining as it did Rommel's ill-fated effort to defend the Atlantic Wall.’
    • ‘But these brilliant victories over greatly superior forces owed little to skilful generalship.’
    • ‘Throughout the narrative he sustains an objective yet often critical assessment of Lee's generalship at all three levels of war - tactical, operational, and strategic.’
    • ‘This is where the classical model of strategy or generalship may have some further relevance.’
    • ‘The battlefields had become a quagmire of blood, gore, mud, miles of trenches and poor generalship on both sides of no-man's land.’
    battle plans, plans, game plans
    View synonyms

Pronunciation:

generalship

/ˈdʒɛn(ə)rəlʃɪp/