Definition of gelid in English:

gelid

adjective

  • Icy; extremely cold.

    ‘the gelid pond’
    figurative ‘she gave a gelid reply’
    • ‘She leapt to another, higher rock and sat on its rim, dangling her toes in the gelid stream.’
    • ‘The wind coming from the gelid ocean was bitter cold, making exposed flesh burn.’
    • ‘I can still recall that gelid winter morning, with the cold wind whistling around my ears.’
    • ‘In two rows, we soldiers wait in the gelid night, parked in what appears to be a square designated for maneuvers.’
    • ‘Talking through teeth gritted against the gelid wind, we converse in a muddle of French, English and Arabic.’
    • ‘No sense of chronological development was sketched out in the London installation; indeed, works of different genres were freely mixed and appeared to be floating in a slightly gelid, continuous present.’
    • ‘But prepare for disillusionment, too, for these artists were blissfully ignorant of more than just the watery liberalism we now cringingly sip like gelid, day-old decaf.’
    • ‘As I run my palm along its breadth, a gelid numbness permeates into my flesh.’
    • ‘The gelid air cocoons the teams in the intensity of their own efforts.’
    • ‘One of these methods is to blanket everyone in a paralyzing, gelid mass of sulfonated sugar polymers - like institutional tapioca pudding.’
    • ‘The four vertical tubes look irresistibly floral after the gelid Tatlin monuments and are dedicated to a master at the other end of the modernist pantheon, Henri Matisse.’
    • ‘The lower rims of both catch and trace a spectral glint of the hard white lighting overhead, dipping as if ready to fall like gelid tears - hard little pearls, frozen in mid-roll.’
    • ‘Although they were high in the mountains, and the wind was from the east, and cold with a foretaste of winter, still, it felt warmer than the gelid air radiating from the White River.’
    • ‘Didn't they care that the emotional tone of his work swings between the saccharine and the gelid?’
    • ‘As the scores indicate - typically gelid to frozen - the shots seem to fall in the unflattering to outright frightening range.’
    • ‘Christmas nears with a vengeance: its jingling bell like a tinkling lily in gelid fluff overhangs the premises where they sell alcoholic beverages and stuff.’
    • ‘This dispassionate view of man and nature brings an icy edge to her work, intensified by her color choice of glacial whites and gelid blues.’
    • ‘The camera is static, and the compositions gelid, lacking any originality.’
    • ‘They are knee-deep in gelid gray water, with food and clothing, skinned seagulls and whale blubber, sheepskins and oilskins - the ancient flotsam of death at sea - sloshing about them.’
    • ‘He waited in ghastly silence under the stairs as the doors flung open, sending in a gelid breeze.’
    frozen, freezing, icy, ice-cold, arctic, glacial, polar, frosty, wintry, snowy, bitterly cold, sub-zero, chilly, siberian, hyperborean, hyperboreal
    algid
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 17th century: from Latin gelidus, from gelu frost, intense cold.

Pronunciation:

gelid

/ˈdʒɛlɪd/