Main definitions of gee in English

: gee1gee2gee3

gee1

(also gee whiz)

exclamation

North American
informal
  • A mild expression, typically of surprise, enthusiasm, or sympathy:

    ‘Gee, Linda looks great at fifty!’
    • ‘I thought gee whiz, I guess I'm living on borrowed time!’
    • ‘It comes across as a sort of gee whiz science museum exposition, one that proposes that the solutions to many of the world's problems are not only within our grasp, but that their solution is inevitable.’
    • ‘I mean, gee, there were a lot of man-hours spent doing that gig, so the least I can say is, ‘Thank you very much.’’
    • ‘You know, your wife may ask, gee, what kind of an example does it set when this happens and everybody in the publishing industry will wring their hands, but unfortunately I think it will happen.’
    • ‘The thrill, if any, comes from finding a video game - gee whiz!’
    • ‘He pauses, shakes his head, then boisterously proclaims, ‘Aw, gee whiz, I guess that means the hot dogs are on me, gang!’’
    • ‘But I thought, gee whiz, I want to do things differently.’
    • ‘I know I'm really a television talker, but gee, twice in my lifetime, somebody's offered me a record situation and I grabbed it and I'm so happy I did.’
    • ‘And he finally said something along the lines of, you know, gee whiz, I won.’
    • ‘And in my youthful naivete I thought, gee, they like it.’
    • ‘We need a little more of this primary care and a little less of the gee whiz.’
    • ‘All your friends are gift-shopping, party-hopping, trimming the tree and - gee!’
    • ‘And, gee whiz, you would also understand the paternalistic attitudes of the time and the nature of defense of the country.’
    • ‘But gee whiz, folks - we do indeed live in the best of times.’
    • ‘When I am praising this Government, I say to it: gee whiz, it is starting to learn.’
    • ‘I agree that there should be a state-by-state analysis of this, and so one can in fact say, gee, do you approve of a particular wording of a constitutional amendment?’
    • ‘And I always thought, gee, daddy, look what I'm doing.’
    • ‘It's time now I believe to move beyond the gee whiz stage.’
    • ‘And for a lot of people, they say, ‘You know, gee, I get tired of this.’’
    • ‘I thought it was great in a way because I thought, gee, maybe we can get some sympathy for the press going finally.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: perhaps an abbreviation of Jesus.

Pronunciation:

gee

/dʒiː/

Main definitions of gee in English

: gee1gee2gee3

gee2

exclamation

gee up
  • A command to a horse to go faster.

    • ‘The goalkeeping union are a tight bunch and he hid his personal agony to gee up his nervous replacement.’
    speed up, accelerate, step up, hasten, hurry, hurry up
    View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]gee someone/thing up
British
  • 1 Command (a horse) to go faster:

    ‘he geed up the horse’
    1. 1.1 Encourage (someone) to put more effort into an activity:
      ‘I was running around geeing people up’
      • ‘He did not gee up the players in the dressing-room - he thought that the desire should bubble within them.’
      • ‘That's the hardest part of this whole job: walking into the changing-room at the final whistle and trying to gee up the boys.’
      • ‘Her job is to gee the women up, tell them about the best bargains and help prise the dollars from their wallets.’
      • ‘I just though I'd try for a little pre-game gee up.’
      • ‘‘He maybe looks as though he is dour and brooding, but he has the knack for making anyone feel at ease and geeing them up at the same time,’ declared one of his colleagues last week.’
      • ‘At the other end, even though mistakes began to creep in, there was enough pace and verve to gee the crowd up if not break through.’
      • ‘It can often be a captain's duty to gee his team-mates up ahead of games.’
      • ‘As vice-captain and pack leader I know I have a responsibility to try and gee up the players.’
      • ‘I worry about it from time to time because I'm in a line of great Scottish captains but I know that, at international level, you don't have to think about geeing people up for a game.’
      • ‘The lumbering gait of his stodgy and dated modal writing needs visuals to gee it up.’
      • ‘But half an hour before the game, he will turn up in the dressing - room and start giving an impassioned speech designed to gee us up.’
      • ‘His energy levels were phenomenal, especially in Bangalore, and on the field, he was the team's engine, geeing people up, consoling, applauding, setting fields, offering and taking advice.’
      • ‘‘The girls gold gave me a big gee up after last night and Ï am happy to swim that fast and I only want to try and go faster tonight,’ she said.’
      • ‘After a fairly-unappealing first half from both sides, he obviously had a word with his men at the interval, and geed them up, because they were revitalised for the start of the second half.’
      • ‘This knockabout stuff seems to gee up the team for today's show.’
      • ‘The crowd were great on Sunday, especially in the second half when we could hear them geeing us up.’
      • ‘He has taken to singing a song of his own composition at the end of his speeches, in order to gee up the troops, so to speak.’
      • ‘In effect, they are intended to be gee up messages to the support base.’
      • ‘No doubt words such as these will be used to gee up the champions as they attempt to eliminate complacent thoughts over the next fraught few days.’
      • ‘I didn't want to walk off having felt I had let the supporters down after they had done so much to gee me up and almost will the ball into the net.’
      speed up, make faster, accelerate, quicken, precipitate, expedite, advance, hurry on, step up, push forward, urge on, spur on
      View synonyms

Origin

Early 17th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

gee

/dʒiː/

Main definitions of gee in English

: gee1gee2gee3

gee3

noun

US
informal
  • A thousand dollars:

    ‘let's go and collect those five gees that they owe us’

Origin

1930s: representing the initial letter of grand.

Pronunciation:

gee

/dʒiː/