Definition of Gaunt in English:

Gaunt

proper noun

Pronunciation:

Gaunt

/ɡɔːnt/

Definition of gaunt in English:

gaunt

adjective

  • 1(of a person) lean and haggard, especially because of suffering, hunger, or age.

    ‘a tall, gaunt woman in black’
    • ‘The priest's gaunt figure dissolved into the shadows beyond the kitchen door.’
    • ‘Now he is so thin he looks almost gaunt.’
    • ‘She was achingly gaunt, her skin pasty white, the lines of her face stark and startling in their prominence.’
    • ‘Then I just noticed how skinny he was, almost gaunt.’
    • ‘Its twisted trunk and mangled branches resembled a terrifyingly gaunt person arching their back in immense agony.’
    • ‘His face was gaunt, his eyes and his cheekbones hollow.’
    • ‘He was gaunt from drinking too much vodka and his marriage was on the skids.’
    • ‘John was a tall, gaunt man with sunken eyes and a smile that spoke of shyness.’
    • ‘She brought choice cuts of meat to the porter's dog, and ordered full meals for the gaunt nuns who came to collect alms at awkward hours of the day.’
    • ‘Her elfin face was thin and angular, almost gaunt, with a small, straight nose.’
    • ‘Many looked gaunt, clothes hanging off them as if draped on clothes racks.’
    • ‘The light from outside the table cast an odd glare on his face, making his face look gaunt.’
    • ‘He was gaunt, looked very tired, and was clearly struggling.’
    • ‘She was gaunt, painfully thin, expressionless, wearing a sleeveless top, dark pants, and sandals.’
    • ‘His hair was limp and unruly, his once cheerful blue eyes were cold and distant, and he was gaunt and tired-looking from the burden he now had to carry.’
    • ‘He is a fair, gaunt man of Norwegian extraction, an international lawyer I think, and has a careful, courteous manner.’
    • ‘He was gaunt, his blond hair gone stringy, and his greasy tux fit the dress code only under the most generous interpretation.’
    • ‘Henry's gaunt figure came into the rim of light cast by the desk lamp.’
    • ‘She was very gaunt and fairly pale, but her personality was like the glowing stars.’
    • ‘He was gaunt and serious from the start, with minimal hand movements and only slightly gesticulating as he dipped into domestic policy issues.’
    haggard, drawn, cadaverous, skeletal, emaciated, skin-and-bones, skinny, spindly, thin, over-thin, size-zero, spare, bony, angular, lank, lean, raw-boned, pinched, hollow-cheeked, hollow-eyed, lantern-jawed, scrawny, scraggy, shrivelled, wasted, withered, raddled
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1(of a building or place) grim or desolate in appearance.
      ‘gaunt tenement blocks’
      • ‘Seven miles of bleak shoreline separate Cobra Mist and the gaunt Martello tower at Shingle Street.’
      • ‘He scoured the gaunt landscape as if his primordial authority was enough to plunge the lid of the monochrome building down to floor level to allow him a cowardly escape.’
      • ‘In a gaunt and craggy landscape the soft, well-rounded Magdalen weeps over her past.’
      • ‘More than 80,000 fans filled the big, gaunt ground.’
      • ‘The moon had finally moved far enough over the high walls of the pass to cast some of its gaunt white light down into the narrows below.’
      • ‘The tall buildings flickered with a glow of white, gaunt towers rising like obelisks in the night thrusting towards a heaven that would forever elude them.’
      • ‘Wherever I played football, the huge gaunt stadium was always the touchstone of my career, the place where I came home to show my people that I could still do the job.’
      • ‘On the tram ride out you pass building sites and the gaunt trusses of an overgrown railway bridge.’
      • ‘One, by the very nature of theatre in the round, is a sense of the house itself as a gaunt, intimidating presence.’
      • ‘Windsor Castle stood out, gaunt and noble in the mist.’
      • ‘Cabooses are another fast disappearing symbol of the railways, those that remain are a gaunt remnant of the former glory of a bygone era.’
      • ‘The newer ones may be concrete and 15 or 20 stories high - gaunt, ugly buildings on an inhuman scale.’
      • ‘With Ahmed as our guide, we are taken to a gaunt, dilapidated building.’
      • ‘He juxtaposes these gaunt scenes with striking black-and-white shots of beaches and landscape.’
      • ‘Fields gave way to scattered woodlands, bare and gaunt against the early winter darkness.’

Origin

Late Middle English: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

gaunt

/ɡɔːnt/