Main definitions of Gaul in English

: Gaul1Gaul2

Gaul1

proper noun

  • An ancient region of Europe, corresponding to modern France, Belgium, the south Netherlands, SW Germany, and northern Italy. The area south of the Alps was conquered in 222 bc by the Romans, who called it Cisalpine Gaul. The area north of the Alps, known as Transalpine Gaul, was taken by Julius Caesar between 58 and 51 bc.

Pronunciation:

Gaul

/ɡɔːl/

Main definitions of Gaul in English

: Gaul1Gaul2

Gaul2

noun

  • A native or inhabitant of ancient Gaul.

    • ‘He claimed that the former inhabitants of Britain were Celts or Gauls on the basis of similarity in ancient place-names in Gaul and Britain.’
    • ‘The Romans, Gauls, Chinese, Egyptians, Greeks and Persians all cherished the egg as a symbol of the universe.’
    • ‘From the Gauls, the Romans gained a wealth of new ideas about wheeled vehicles, greatly improving the value of their road-system.’
    • ‘The Angles, Saxons, Danes, Frisians and other invaders intermarried with the existing Romano-British Celts, Romans, Jutes, Gauls, Greeks and Lombards.’
    • ‘In the 4th century they were driven out of Elba and Corsica, defeated by the Gauls in 390, and finally allied themselves with Rome after defeat in 283.’
    • ‘Pliny the Elder, Plutarch and Dio Cassius all give accounts of pairs of Gauls and Greeks being buried alive in Rome at times of great stress as human sacrifices.’
    • ‘The emergence of the modern nation took place over several centuries and resulted from a combination of the cultural influences of Gauls, Romans, and Franks.’
    • ‘It was a combination of towers, palisades, ditches, abatis, and caltrops to slow the attacking Gauls, so that Roman missile engines could more effectively engage them.’
    • ‘The head of the civil administration as far as Britain was concerned was the praetorian prefect of the Gauls, based in Trier, to whom the vicarius of the British diocese was responsible.’
    • ‘It fastened on the Gauls as the Celtic inhabitants of the whole of France and on their subjugation first by the Romans, then by the Franks.’
    • ‘This was the first crucial test of his war strategy: he proclaimed the liberty of the Gauls, those Germanic tribes who had settled in northern Italy and who had not been long under Roman rule.’
    • ‘As these local ties grew stronger, the provincial troops came to think of themselves as Gauls or Britons as much as Romans.’
    • ‘The Roman Army had been fighting in Gaul and the Britons had been helping the Gauls in an effort to defeat the Romans.’
    • ‘Irish is a Celtic language of Indo-European origin, related to the ancient language of the Gauls.’
    • ‘We may infer either residents from the Roman world, most probably Gauls, or Britons responding to new cultural fashions - and indeed, perhaps both.’
    • ‘Plutarch, on the basis of Caesar's figures, reports that a million Gauls were killed and another million enslaved.’
    • ‘Centuries of conflict between the Gauls and Romans ended in 52 BC, when Julius Caesar's legions took control of the territory and the settlement became a Roman town.’
    • ‘At the funeral of Herod those in attendance were Thracians, Gauls, Germans, and Jewish Guards.’
    • ‘When the Gauls rebelled against Rome, Caesar was very reasonable with those guys at first.’
    • ‘Camillus liberated Rome from siege by the Gauls and secured the return of the state's gold, but later Roman historiography created an image of Camillus as a proto-Augustus by claiming that he brought back the signa, or standards.’

Origin

From Latin Gallus, probably of Celtic origin.

Pronunciation:

Gaul

/ɡɔːl/