Definition of garnet in English:

garnet

noun

  • 1A precious stone consisting of a deep red vitreous silicate mineral.

    [as modifier] ‘a garnet ring’
    • ‘A fellow that he knows showed us a bucketful of aquamarines and two large garnets and then took us for a short walk to the pegmatites on his farm.’
    • ‘She described star garnets from Emerald Creek, Idaho, as opaque.’
    • ‘On the crescents were rubies and garnets in diamond form and in round forms.’
    • ‘The rocks here are composed of mica schist, and garnets are often found embedded in them.’
    • ‘Emeralds, rubies, diamonds, blue sapphire, pearls, yellow sapphire, cat's eye, garnets, amethyst, jade, etc., are just some of the stones which are said to have healing properties.’
    • ‘In contrast, garnets from Salida, Colorado, are only superficially altered.’
    • ‘He also found particles of gemstones such as corundum, garnet, rutile, and argentite.’
    • ‘Those little red garnets you see in stores are usually pyrope garnets and green garnets are usually grossularite/grossular.’
    • ‘Think of semi-precious stones such as garnets, topaz, amethyst, aquamarine as much for their range of hues as for the way they hold the light, infusing it with shimmering color.’
    • ‘Sapphires, rubies, garnets, and emeralds are all perfectly acceptable, though.’
    • ‘There are strings of garnets, opal, turquoise and onyx set in silver at the Jaipur stalls, lac bangles from Rajasthan, silver dipped in gold and even wooden Etikoppakka bangles coloured with vegetable dyes.’
    • ‘Rare earth element distributions in the zircons and garnets strongly suggest that the zircon overgrowths formed in equilibrium with garnet.’
    • ‘Generally, there was a higher demand for yellow and pink tourmaline, as well as medium to deep blue aquamarine followed by amethyst and pinkish garnets.’
    • ‘He said if exploited in the right way Zambia's great variety of gemstones that includes emeralds, amethyst, aquamarines, tourmalines and garnets offered great potential for poverty reduction.’
    • ‘Again, it is assumed that readers know aquamarine is beryl, amethyst is quartz, and Iceland spar is calcite but cannot grapple with the complexity of remembering that spessartine and grossular are garnets.’
    • ‘The spring 2005 collection features thin fourteen-karat-gold strands interlaced with small garnets, emeralds, pink tourmalines, and other stones.’
    • ‘Another garnet, a mixture of pyrope and spessartine, is called malaya garnet in the gem trade.’
    • ‘In my next installment of News from Japan, I will be reporting on them as well as on a visit to Kyushu University to see the Ko collection and field trips to collect sakura ishi and rainbow garnets.’
    • ‘One of the rings on her left hand was set with red garnets and the ring on her right middle finger is unusual as it is cut in an S shape.’
    • ‘Another coiffure ornament from the 1904 display, now vanished but shown in the center of Plate V, consisted of silver filigree, carnelians, garnets, and enamel blackberries and leaves.’
    1. 1.1Mineralogy
      [mass noun]Any of a class of silicate minerals including this, which belong to the cubic system and have the general chemical formula A3B2(SiO4)3 (A and B being respectively divalent and trivalent metals).
      • ‘At the B-Q claims, beryl occurs with dark red garnet, smoky quartz, and black tourmaline in miarolitic cavities in a granite pegmatite dykes that cuts across the foliation of a high-grade metamorphic gneiss.’
      • ‘Early attempts applying the Sm-Nd isotope system to garnet and clinopyroxene were encouraging and often yielded dates considered as representing near-peak P-T conditions.’
      • ‘Coexisting MI phases in these rocks include garnet, plagioclase, quartz, tourmaline and fluorite.’
      • ‘That the Fe-Mg equilibrium between garnet and clinopyroxene records high temperatures, indicates that early elemental compositions were preserved through the lower temperature part of the P-T-t path.’
      • ‘Most have some collectible minerals such as beryl, garnet, and schorl, and a few have lithium minerals.’

Origin

Middle English: probably via Middle Dutch from Old French grenat, from medieval Latin granatus, perhaps from granatum (see pomegranate), because the garnet is similar in colour to the pulp of the fruit.

Pronunciation:

garnet

/ˈɡɑːnɪt/