Definition of garble in English:

garble

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Reproduce (a message, sound, or transmission) in a confused and distorted way.

    ‘garbled directions’
    • ‘Once, we could understand everything he said with perfect clarity, but now, everything is garbled and sometimes even slurred.’
    • ‘His voice sounds somewhat garbled in those recordings.’
    • ‘The interrogator began speaking through an intercom, his voice garbled in static.’
    • ‘Even then, you can expect anything other than the simplest bullets to be garbled.’
    • ‘Connor's transmission was very garbled, but the seriousness of the situation was clear to all listening.’
    • ‘The funny bit is that the spam protection they are offering is just a bit of JavaScript that garbles email addresses so they cannot be harvested.’
    • ‘You try to talk to a fellow shopper, but your words sound garbled, and others seem confused by your speech.’
    • ‘On windy days, the smoke was wafted so that signals became garbled and confusing.’
    • ‘The message was somewhat garbled, and the three men in question were still 24 hours from Tulsa, but the threat was taken seriously by the FBI, who called in the local police.’
    • ‘If this was the case, it is strange that the message was so garbled - no clear understanding of BT's thinking emerged until after the first reports of a boardroom bust-up.’
    • ‘Once again the mixed message is more garbled than ever: it's okay to be independent, but beware of those you think you trust.’
    • ‘That was rather garbled and hastily thrown together, but we will return with him.’
    • ‘After waking up, her speech was garbled and she was confused.’
    • ‘You implant a patient, and initially all they hear is garbled noise, and in six months they can carry on a conversation on the telephone.’
    • ‘He called, his voice garbled by the sound of hammering and drilling.’
    • ‘He told the inquest the message was garbled and he couldn't understand any of it.’
    • ‘His lawyers protested, claiming that this would hamper their ability to ask follow up questions or to clarify points that might be garbled through translators.’
    • ‘Often the message becomes garbled as it filters through several languages.’
    • ‘Canadian voters spoke but, once again, the voting system garbled the message.’
    • ‘The result will be calls where your voice will be broken up and garbled.’
    mix up, muddle, jumble, confuse, blur, slur, obscure, distort, twist, twist around, warp, misstate, misquote, misreport, misrepresent, mistranslate, misinterpret, misconstrue
    View synonyms

noun

  • A garbled account or transmission.

    ‘most readers assumed the word was a typographical garble’
    mass noun ‘upon winning a race a driver spews out a litany of commercial garble’
    • ‘Why I was rambling a spew of unintelligible garble, I had not a clue.’
    • ‘DataCore, to be sure, doles out the same virtualization garble as every other vendor, promising a management heaven full of automation and abstracted disk.’
    • ‘Repeated attempts to contact the Sol System have been met only with static and nonsensical garbles.’
    • ‘The about section of her web site is full of fanciful garble about her consulting work.’
    • ‘I plowed through this text in my bedroom late at night, while the unintelligible garble of the downstairs television kept me abreast of my parents' assured position in front of it.’
    • ‘Language is employed as a formative element of the rhythm and music, but all a garble of German phrases, English sentence fragments, hissing, and hiccuping.’
    • ‘At first, she thought that her voice had come out in an unintelligible garble, but she finally realized that the reason for their mirth was coming from behind her, out the window.’
    • ‘His widely mocked garble about him taking his ‘high horse’ on the ‘low road’ is actually, with a bit of untangling, a pretty good image.’
    • ‘That wonderful pattern-matching ability I've mentioned elsewhere comes into being and forces us to turn garble into sense, any sense, even if it's nonsense.’
    • ‘On the surface, the Violettes' debut album follows a well-tested formula for soundscape pop: her delicate voice soaks in a bath of fuzzy guitars, droning cello, and the garble of vocal samples run backward.’
    • ‘She waited patiently for the caller to reply but all she got was garble from the other end.’
    • ‘It may have been Shakespeare fatigue, but the scene between Falstaff and Doll Tearsheet, played as a strung-out Eastender with Blade Runner hair, was for significant periods pure garble, to be endured rather than enjoyed.’
    • ‘Started in Portland in 1999, their self-titled debut was incapable of prodding you into these visions, these half-lucid garbles of thought and imagination.’
    • ‘While the musical numbers do sound great, there are periods where the vocals could have been cleaned up to eliminate moments of muted garble.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘sift out, cleanse’): from Anglo-Latin and Italian garbellare, from Arabic ġarbala ‘sift’, perhaps from late Latin cribellare ‘to sieve’, from Latin cribrum ‘sieve’.

Pronunciation

garble

/ˈɡɑːb(ə)l/