Definition of garage in English:

garage

noun

  • 1A building for housing a motor vehicle or vehicles:

    ‘a detached house with an integral garage’
    ‘a bus garage’
    • ‘Both homes will have integral garages to the front, and will share driveway access from a new entrance on Shady Lane.’
    • ‘To the left of the driveway a cubic building, housing the garage and chauffeur's flat above, guards the courtyard just beyond.’
    • ‘One of their cars is at their apartment, and the other parked in the garage of the apartment building where Joe and I live.’
    • ‘She said the van of her boyfriend had been damaged three nights in a row while it was parked on the street and he had now been forced to rent a garage to keep his vehicle safe.’
    • ‘The Council's executive member for the environment appealed to drivers to put their vehicles in driveways and garages to keep roads clear for gritting.’
    • ‘We built office buildings, parking garages, and prisons.’
    • ‘It boasts many outbuildings, a guest house, workshop, garages and even air raid bunkers.’
    • ‘Zoning permits carriage houses, thus providing flexible space for a home office, an in-law apartment, or affordable rental housing above garages.’
    • ‘The garages are behind a building company premises.’
    • ‘It is the largest building occupied by Laois Civil Defence and contains two vehicle garages and lecture room.’
    • ‘Ford tucked the photograph and the address into his jacket and headed to the garage below his apartment building.’
    • ‘The remaining outbuildings include a garage, barn, two fowl houses, two stables, four old stores and two boathouses.’
    • ‘Ensure all doors and windows are secured and buildings like sheds, garages and outhouses have good quality locks and even alarms fitted.’
    • ‘Retrospective planning permission for the garage and underneath storage building, which is on green belt land, had already been refused.’
    • ‘Many fires started when lava ignited gasoline stored in buildings and garages in this eastern Congo town.’
    • ‘There is also a range of stone outbuildings including a coach house, two garages, a workshop and log store.’
    • ‘In addition to the existing pub there are two garages and offices, as well as housing.’
    • ‘Bloomfield is a two-storey Victorian building with garages, courtyard and conservatory and has been vacant for two years.’
    • ‘Its outbuildings include a double garage, greenhouse, potting shed, kennels and workshop.’
    • ‘The new building will include facilities for visiting surveyors, offices, rescue team equipment, a garage for three vehicles and a workshop.’
    depot, terminus, terminal, base, headquarters
    car port, lock-up
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An establishment which sells fuel or which repairs and sells motor vehicles.
      • ‘Independent garages that want to service, repair or sell a variety of marques will need to invest in many areas.’
      • ‘Having sold a chain of garages and moved into property ownership, Paul has devoted more time to the race and developed a business helping others to get their rally adventures off the ground.’
      • ‘We submitted a vehicle to seven garages, all of which failed to spot at least one significant fault identified by a senior RAC inspector as MOT fails.’
      • ‘The only place the councils should be getting involved here is with the existing Trading Standards officers that they control to clamp down on garages who pass these vehicles on their annual test.’
      • ‘There was a garage for repairs, petrol pumps, a shop, taxi service and private cars for hire.’
      • ‘The study in France found a link between cases of acute leukaemia among youngsters and how close they lived to a petrol station or a garage carrying out car repairs.’
      • ‘The garage is selling petrol at 97.9 cent per litre.’
      • ‘That meant the companies' own garages got fuel cheaper than independent rivals, who were priced out of the market.’
      • ‘Schools, supermarkets, banks, post offices, garages, buses, the passenger rail service and others are all expected to be slowed down by absent workers.’
      • ‘Why is Belmont Motors the only garage getting fuel?’
      • ‘If we are not careful we will end up with a town full of houses and nothing else, as hotels, garages, nursing homes, pubs, clubs, churches and shops succumb to the smug economic reality of spiralling property prices.’
      • ‘But perhaps the main reason why most people shy away from LPG conversions is that it is sometimes difficult to find a garage that sells the fuel.’
      • ‘Shell currently supplies fuel to the garage but there is no long-term arrangement in place and purchasers can link up to any fuel company they like.’
      • ‘He said the garage had stopped selling petrol and closed its small convenience store in December last year, but still operated as an MOT and repair workshop.’
      • ‘Wigan and Oldham are the best places in the area to fill up if you are looking to save the pennies, with the cheapest garages there selling unleaded petrol at 79.9p a litre.’
      • ‘Craven District Council made its garage available so that vehicles could be thoroughly checked, as the council and the local taxi owners are keen to see that all taxis are safe.’
      • ‘Another example of a possessory lien is if you take your truck to a garage for repairs, the garage can keep possession of your truck until you pay the repair bill.’
      • ‘She added that the town had lost garages, hotels and workshops needed to ensure Ilkley was a balanced and independent community.’
      • ‘Another problem faced by drivers was grit and dirt being thrown up from the roads and plastering windscreens and there were even reports of motorists queuing at garages to buy screenwash.’
      • ‘When I buy a car, I don't expect that I'll have to keep returning it to the garage for constant repairs.’
      petrol station, service station
      View synonyms
  • 2[mass noun] A style of unpolished, energetic rock music associated with suburban amateur bands:

    [as modifier] ‘a garage band’
    • ‘Its rough and edgy production makes the record sound perfect for the demented brand of new wave garage rock the band were practicing at the time.’
    • ‘The spunky ‘Vertigo’ is a breezy sprint through jagged, two-chord garage rock.’
    • ‘If you're in the market for an answer to the sometimes-lackluster garage rock offerings, Reigning Sound might be just what you're looking for.’
    • ‘In short, this is about as idiosyncratic as garage rock gets.’
    • ‘The White Stripes cannot single-handedly satiate one man's desire for primal garage rock.’
    • ‘The relaxed instrumentation elevates the insightful vocals, creating a sound best described as progressive garage rock.’
    • ‘The band, a stunning combination of garage rock simplicity and punk attitude is also steeped to the gills in 1960s style soul.’
    • ‘Tacking on vibraphones to clumsy, endlessly repetitive garage rock does nothing but emphasize the complete lack of original ideas that plagues this album.’
    • ‘Both artists are born out of DJ culture and enjoy wildly diverse musical tastes, which isn't to say that this is merely a voguish rediscovery of garage rock.’
    • ‘The bass player plays some gnarly fuzz bass that underscores the band's songs and adds rumble to the band's garage rock sound.’
    • ‘After literally half an hour The Kills left the stage but in such a short time they had certainly convinced the audience that they are not just another garage rock band looking to make a fast buck on the style bandwagon.’
    • ‘The Pedestrians are a similar ilk of kitchen sink tales set to garage rock and new wave styling.’
    • ‘Like any self-respecting garage rock band, they take it to every track, with no breaks for sissy ballads.’
    • ‘Nearly three years ago, they had hopped on the Whites Stripes wagon of American garage rock under a band name of Pavor.’
    • ‘In one short year, the band apparently got a grip on their distinctive mix of garage rock, rockabilly, and crude humor - and crowds were apparently taking notice.’
    • ‘All members had good record collections and remained committed to a specific musical narrative that began with garage rock and the Velvet Underground.’
    • ‘A substantial percentage of garage rock fans are considerably younger than the music they enjoy, so nostalgia is obviously not a factor.’
    • ‘Sonic Youth's 19th album doesn't break any new ground, but it does serve as a reminder that the band invented this style of music - garage rock with avant-garde scope and ambition.’
    • ‘Old school garage rock may be fun and sloppy, but the amateur aesthetic has its limits when one hits a professional stage.’
    • ‘Whilst garage rock has blustered into the mainstream, this is a band that has more or less written the book on 21st century glittered, gutter level, punk with an IQ.’
  • 3[mass noun] A form of dance music incorporating elements of drum and bass, house music, and soul, characterized by a rhythm in which the second and fourth beats of the bar are omitted.

    • ‘However, this subsequent release is proof positive that Oxide and Neutrino are no one trick pony; in fact, Execute is perhaps the definitive UK garage album so far.’
    • ‘Do you need large doses of garage, deep house and Afro Latin rhythms to get your head together?’
    • ‘The soundtrack, meanwhile, has moved away from his UK garage and hip hop origins and takes in everything from soul, dance and chillout to rock and anything else he fancies.’
    • ‘In recent years, both hip-hop and UK garage have developed a culture of duality.’
    • ‘From hardcore to house to UK garage, he has had a hand in it all.’
    • ‘There are echoes of hip-hop, reggae, socca, calypso and soul in garage.’
    • ‘Consequently, the album sews punk, northern soul, hip hop, garage and electronica together and then pulls the whole lot inside out.’
    • ‘He is one of the pioneers of UK garage.’
    • ‘Ska, dub, house, drum and bass, hip hop and UK garage have all been thrown in to The Streets' sampler for processing and rearrangement.’
    • ‘Later he would DJ a largely R&B set, but before long he found the addictive heavy reggae basslines and the energy of the garage rhythms more to his taste.’
    • ‘Just as Radio Caroline in the 1960s paved the way for Radio 1, the London pirates are turning garage and dance music into commercial hits.’
    • ‘Locked into US hip-hop, Jamaican ragga and UK garage culture, he and his peers couldn't be more isolated from Westminster.’
    • ‘The number of pirate stations has doubled in 10 years, finding audiences for otherwise neglected music such as UK garage and drum 'n' bass, or using £400 homemade transmitters to spread anarchist or black-power propaganda.’
    • ‘But its contents were more like proto-grime, the beats mostly two-step and UK garage, and the vibe far more playful and genial, courtesy of now almost forgotten crews like Heartless and Genius.’
    • ‘They moved away from UK garage to a more hip hop sound.’
    • ‘So it's perfectly natural that modern production will incorporate quality blends of R & B, soul and garage with positive results.’
    • ‘The sound is a direct descendant of old skool UK garage, the bumpy beats of yore with rubbery basslines and cutting edge sampling techniques, taking in everything from soul to electro to jazz to blue grass.’
    • ‘Within UK garage there are different genres of music: sublow, grime, 4/4 and old school.’
    • ‘His singles have skillfully mixed pop R & B with gentle hints of UK garage rhythms.’
    • ‘Drum & bass has infiltrated house and hip hop and garage, which is good because it keeps things changing.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Put or keep (a motor vehicle) in a garage:

    ‘the car needn't be garaged in the winter’
    • ‘Sadly it seems that unless your car is garaged overnight you may, in future, have to take a quick peek at the front of your motor each morning to check that all is well.’
    • ‘Data showed that consumers wanted year-round performance in a sedan or coupe, rather than purchasing a sport utility while garaging their existing rear-wheel-drive luxury car.’
    • ‘As it isn't, it could be something unusual that occurs only when you garage the car.’
    • ‘Capable of garaging the team's four Land Rovers, its extensive rescue gear, the base now boasts a control room, offices, meeting room, kitchen, showers, and a place for relatives to wait pending news of a recovery operation.’
    • ‘One day, he announced that he was buying a motorcycle combination, and that he would have to build a shed to garage it.’
    • ‘She let her employment contract run out, rented out her house and garaged the car.’
    • ‘The Ford is garaged every night and it is always in good running order.’
    • ‘To stay a week in 1946 was five guineas all inclusive of breakfast, lunch, tea and dinner, plus one and six to garage the car.’
    • ‘In Class One, the Buggies up to 6000 cc, former winners Mark and Michael will again be at the start line in their MBR Jimco, which is normally garaged in Burrumbeet, Victoria.’
    • ‘The lion's share of theft takes place outside people's homes, so insurers may be reluctant to give cover to a bike that is not garaged at night.’
    • ‘We all have the right to pass along it unhindered and no one has the right to garage their car permanently on the highway.’
    • ‘The vehicles will actually be garaged at Bramley station but in terms of cover this standby point will provide the same as a small ambulance station, which is what we would class the old Horsforth station as.’
    • ‘It is only used as a fine-weather car and is garaged.’
    • ‘Additional security measures, such as garaging the car, can also bring down premiums.’
    • ‘I drive a Fiat Brava, garaged in one of the lowest risk areas in Britain.’
    • ‘During the trial period the test car was not garaged, but exposed to moderately cold Michigan weather and one light snowfall.’
    • ‘When I was in high school a friend drove a 1970 Impala that his gearhead dad had kept garaged for years.’

Origin

Early 20th century: from French, from garer to shelter.

Pronunciation:

garage

/ˈɡarɑː(d)ʒ/