Definition of gap in English:

gap

noun

  • 1A break or hole in an object or between two objects:

    ‘he peeped through the gap in the curtains’
    • ‘Radon from the ground gets into buildings mainly through cracks in floors or gaps around pipes or cables.’
    • ‘The rain entered the building through literally hundreds of ducts, gaps, cracks, crevices and half-open windows and vents.’
    • ‘But in my rush I could not find a gap in the hedge to get through to the main road.’
    • ‘These holes, and the gaps left by her quickly vanishing superstructure allowed easy and safe access for divers.’
    • ‘A lack of legs helps them fit into tight gaps and crevices and down narrow holes.’
    • ‘An officer patrolling the Murton area in the early hours of today noticed a large gap in the hedge on Moor Lane and investigated.’
    • ‘Select a tree that is uniformly shaped on all sides without gaps or holes where branches are broken or missing.’
    • ‘The gaps in the cotoneaster hedge were plugged with holly and box.’
    • ‘The metal work done on the aft booms was of poor quality, with putty applied in an attempt to cover over gaps around screw holes.’
    • ‘We ended up with scaffolds built from these approaches that only had small holes where the gaps were.’
    • ‘Last summer when the park shut at 8pm, teenagers would sneak through a gap in the hedge and congregate in groups.’
    • ‘There should not be any holes or gaps at the bottom of the fence or around the gate.’
    • ‘After the molding is put up, use wood putty to fill visible nail holes and small gaps for a seamless look.’
    • ‘However, there were gaps around the curtain where you could see inside.’
    • ‘So after all my regular warnings about the right way to clip hedges, you find yourself with a hedge that has gaps all along its base.’
    • ‘Yesterday we plugged the gap in the hedge with two new buddleia plants.’
    • ‘He watches carefully where he treads so as to avoid some of the bigger holes and gaps between the half-rotten floorboards.’
    • ‘Shafts of light danced in through gaps between the planks.’
    • ‘Once we got there, we crept through the small gap in the overgrown hedges that served as the entranceway.’
    • ‘In the distance where the land dips away, neighbouring fields are surrounded by scrubby hedges with large gaps.’
    opening, aperture, space, breach, chink, slit, slot, vent, crack, crevice, cranny, cavity, hole, orifice, interstice, perforation, break, fracture, rift, rent, fissure, cleft, divide, discontinuity
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A pass or way through a range of hills:
      [as name] ‘Watford Gap’
      • ‘The bison pour through a gap in the hills and are in the corrals in just a few minutes.’
      • ‘His hilltop castle commands the only broad gap through the Purbeck hills.’
      • ‘Plans to build a road through the gap have stirred up strong feelings on both sides of the long-running debate.’
      • ‘Once the Bealach Gaothach is reached, below Kilbride Hill, look for a gap in the forest boundary below.’
      • ‘It is quite literally a gap in the mountains and the largest town in the southern alps.’
      • ‘The village was built on a hill with deep gaps around it.’
      • ‘It had to pass through gaps in the high mountain range to reach Wamena.’
      • ‘They have 160 km of through road with a few side tracks leading to the gaps and gorges nearby.’
      route, way, road, narrow road, passage, cut, gorge, canyon, ravine, gully, defile, col, couloir
      View synonyms
  • 2A space or interval; a break in continuity:

    ‘there are many gaps in our understanding of what happened’
    • ‘Nonetheless, this book nicely fills some gaps in the literature on Southern slavery.’
    • ‘Critical gaps extracted from different reference-line scenarios were also examined.’
    • ‘These seem to fill in the gaps between the different excerpts that make up most of the book.’
    • ‘For example, when a nurse cares for two or more patients and must divide attention between them there is a potential for gaps in the continuity of care.’
    • ‘In one cut, the film leaps across great gaps in time and space - only a press kit could tell me what was supposed to have happened.’
    • ‘However, work would need to be undertaken with the organisations to ensure a full review of the situation identifies any gaps or overlaps in the current system.’
    • ‘A biography would bore her, she says, preferring to fill in the gaps left by earlier writers and to give them a fresh, contemporary perspective.’
    • ‘Like Patricia, they want to fill in the missing gaps, the apparent holes and spaces in the very surface of the text.’
    • ‘The work of COMGAS is diverse and eclectic, connected by a desire to explore the gaps and spaces in the fabric of cultural production.’
    • ‘Faculty losses have left gaps in the geography department.’
    • ‘So, unfortunately, we have a huge gap in our knowledge.’
    • ‘What struck him while interviewing him were the gaps in his life story.’
    • ‘Career gaps are no longer viewed with suspicion and they can actually enhance your prospects, she writes.’
    • ‘If there is such a collective acceptance of holes and gaps in the theory of evolution then why is there such loyalty to only the one idea.’
    • ‘Some processors are working with third parties to identify gaps in their security situation.’
    • ‘This will then leave a major gap in the trained, professional sector in years to come.’
    • ‘They describe some gaps in the literature and provide some suggestions for future research.’
    • ‘The gap in the current literature exists when we consider race and gender.’
    • ‘However a lapse of almost two years since the last scheme has left a gap in continuity.’
    • ‘When considering social issues in particular judges must not substitute their own views to fill gaps.’
    pause, intermission, interval, interlude, delay, break, breathing space, breather, respite, hiatus
    omission, blank, blank space, empty space, lacuna, hiatus, void, vacuity
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 A difference, especially an undesirable one, between two views or situations:
      ‘the media were bridging the gap between government and people’
      • ‘There is a huge gap between rich and poor countries across a range of health measures.’
      • ‘In all of the eight categories massive price gaps or quote differentials existed.’
      • ‘A wide gap exists between the majority of the government and the wishes of the people.’
      • ‘Someday we'll have the will again to tackle all the other gaps that divide us.’
      • ‘Bridging the gap between paper and the network - this is the most important new technology for a decade.’
      • ‘We also confronted the challenges and exerted our utmost efforts to bridge the various gaps and differences existing in the region.’
      • ‘It simply made no difference because the gap between reality and policy is irreconcilable.’
      • ‘But his chances of bridging the gap with only five racing days to go are virtually non-existent.’
      • ‘The next government must close the gaps between different strands of support services.’
      • ‘If closing the gap between different income brackets is the name of the game, let it be across the board.’
      • ‘How many times over the years has the music industry played up records bridging the gap between jazz and hip hop?’
      • ‘Our children will never have equal opportunity unless, once and for all, we close the ever-widening achievement gap.’
      • ‘Fortunately, there are players out there who are bridging the gap between art and entertainment.’
      • ‘A widening gender pay gap is created and overall, working mothers' employment potential becomes limited.’
      • ‘The festival in June aims to bridge the gap between different periods and traditions.’
      • ‘This gap is the difference between a firm's present distribution system and the potential for it to be increased.’
      • ‘As a result, salary gaps between different sports and between individual players can be quite large.’
      • ‘Employers are ditching company schemes, yet no-one seems to be bridging the gap with private savings.’
      • ‘He said the Government had an historic opportunity to close the growing income gap in Ireland.’
      • ‘Equality campaigners believe the move is a major step forward in trying to close the gender pay gap.’
      chasm, gulf, rift, polarity, split, separation, breach
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old Norse, chasm; related to gape.

Pronunciation:

gap

/ɡap/