Definition of galloglass in English:

galloglass

(also gallowglass)

noun

historical
  • (in Ireland) a mercenary or member of a special class of soldiers in the service of a chieftain.

    • ‘Dermot O'Conor Don, a valiant man, had, with a body of 1,500 kerns and gallowglasses, entered his service.’
    • ‘For over three centuries, up to the final defeat of the seventeenth century, they fought as gallowglasses in the struggles of Ulster, mainly on behalf of the O'Donnells.’
    • ‘The galloglass were renowned for their valor and steadfastness in battle - and an unbending loyalty to their employers.’
    • ‘Composition involved, in Gaelic parts, the commutation of the chief's right to take up supplies for his household and quarter his kerne and galloglass on his subjects for defence.’
    • ‘Like early gallowglasses, they were supporting Mael Sechnaill, king of Tara, against the Scandinavians of Dublin and his Irish rivals.’

Origin

Late 15th century: from Irish gallóglach, from gall foreigner and óglach youth, servant, warrior.

Pronunciation:

galloglass

/ˈɡalə(ʊ)ɡlɑːs/