Definition of gaggle in English:

gaggle

noun

  • 1A flock of geese.

    • ‘I plunked down my cash, all the while admiring the plant with its white flowers so much like the heads of a gaggle of nodding geese.’
    • ‘I would much rather be involved in a series with a benevolent dictator instead of a gaggle of geese.’
    • ‘The empty set is the set of the goslings the two gaggles share.’
    • ‘Readers may have heard about a pack of wolves or a litter of puppies, but do they know which animals make up a gaggle or a murder?’
    • ‘The interactions of geese from different gaggles is identical to that of lesbians who try to interact from different group lots of honking and goose drama is likely to ensue.’
    • ‘Along with gaggles of Canada Geese, we saw our first groups of Brant.’
    • ‘In the lower left portion of the canvas, a gaggle of geese moves about in Brownian motion.’
    • ‘These failures become apparent through the absence of first-year birds in the winter gaggles.’
    • ‘It is also a popular watering hole to gaggles of geese which fly in from time to time.’
    group, crowd, gang, company, body, band, host, bevy, party, pack, army, herd, flock, drove, horde, mob
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  • 2informal A disorderly group of people.

    ‘the gaggle of photographers that dogged his every step’
    • ‘Housed in a gleaming, 1967 Airstream trailer, which was parked in front of Greenwich House Pottery, it drew gaggles of viewers and buyers right off the sidewalk.’
    • ‘There is a crowded, Hooray Henry exuberance to the room, with pink-cheeked gents swilling dry Martinis and families with gaggles of well-dressed, extraordinarily blonde children.’
    • ‘The gaggle of girls gathered around them, their expressions concerned.’
    • ‘Beyond the door a few inquisitive souls stood in a loose gaggle watching the fortunate emerge.’
    • ‘When he does manage to express himself, his gaggle of interfering sisters humiliate him for the effort.’
    • ‘It's lunchtime in Dublin and the city is heaving with people; gaggles of students, young office workers, couples, women with babies in buggies.’
    • ‘Today, it involves federal courts, a gaggle of sturdy lawyers or both.’
    • ‘The triumphant band walks back stage through gaggles of groupies to their dressing room.’
    • ‘It facilitates the exchange of songs expressing social concerns, sharing of ideas and presents a record of events happening with the many gaggles of Grannies.’
    • ‘Other characters include a gang of lads and a gaggle of girls on a night out, a tacky DJ, a hotdog salesman and a cabbie.’
    • ‘There's an edgy, youthful feel to the sprawling stone downtown, where gaggles of short-haired, punky students walk narrow, walled streets.’
    • ‘Yes, she'll miss the glamour, the gaggle of schoolgirls crowding round for autographs.’
    • ‘Ten minutes from the ground and you could already feel the unmistakable hum of a huge gaggle of excited people gathered together.’
    • ‘Mostly blokes, but gaggles of girls get the treatment as well.’
    • ‘The gaggle thinned out as most of the flex wings also fell down.’
    • ‘On the contrary, the place was mostly packed, with elderly first-date couples and gaggles of neighborhood bon vivants out for a night on the town.’
    • ‘And gaggles of beaded tourists who come to town are always looking for something a little more elaborate than a souvenir to take home with them when visiting the magical Cajun town.’
    • ‘All you need to do is find a gaggle of geeks at a party or in a college bar.’
    • ‘Even the kitchen staff had come in from their duties, and were standing in a gaggle near the back of the room.’
    • ‘She obeyed, using orange and bright neon pink crayons, drawing gaggles of flowers, hands, and distorted faces that closely resemble Easter Island Statues.’
    group, gang, mob, pack, troop, troupe, company, party, bevy, crew, body, working party, posse
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Origin

Middle English (as a verb): imitative of the noise that a goose makes; compare with Dutch gaggelen and German gackern.

Pronunciation

gaggle

/ˈɡaɡ(ə)l/