Main definitions of fuse in English

: fuse1fuse2

fuse1

verb

  • 1with object Join or blend to form a single entity.

    ‘intermarriage had fused the families into a large unit’
    • ‘Also, uniquely, the male and female parts of the flower are fused into a single structure, called the column.’
    • ‘He only married you to fuse the families together.’
    • ‘Perhaps in Leonardo, more than any other person we mention in this article, mathematics and art were fused in a single concept.’
    • ‘His blends of smooth sounds and ruff beats fuse old-school elements with the new, and his skill as a DJ is right up there too.’
    • ‘The bottom-up saliency map is finally determined by fusing the conspicuity maps.’
    • ‘He also determinedly reinvented the notion of the auteur by fusing it with public relations and advertising.’
    • ‘Their forebrains are fused into a single indivisible whole, and they always die at birth.’
    • ‘And at times, the two sides merge, each fusing the other's major preoccupation to its own.’
    • ‘One plan, which Miller has been promoting for five years, calls for 40 eastern and Mon Valley municipalities to voluntarily fuse into a single entity.’
    • ‘Neither of these breaches necessarily involves anonymous sources, but that doesn't mean that the issues are not fused in the public's view of news media overall.’
    • ‘Activists who developed their campaigning skills fighting neoliberalism in the 1980s and 90s risk being out maneuvered by a movement which fuses economic aspiration with family values.’
    • ‘Subsequent to this, the two small groups were fused into a single larger group.’
    • ‘Voices Of White City is an exceptional project that fuses public art with the local community.’
    • ‘They have hind limbs that are at least four times as long as their front legs, and the foot bones are often fused into a single long cannon bone, which gives the animal greater leverage for jumping.’
    • ‘The intention of the Cao Dai faith is to fuse a new synthesis of the world's great religions, taking the best aspects of each.’
    • ‘Morover, both towns fused the cause of public health with that of cleanliness.’
    • ‘Further muddling my ability to fuse my private and public sense of my relationship is the paradox of race in general.’
    • ‘Ubiquitous computing leads to the fusing of the digital and the physical.’
    • ‘In the adults of most vertebrates, the braincase is largely fused into a single solid mass.’
    • ‘Instead, these two principles are fused into a single principle: the principle of conservation of mass-energy.’
    • ‘Second, there was no single flowmaster to fuse all mobility requirements.’
    combine, amalgamate, put together, blend, merge, meld, mingle, intermix, intermingle, synthesize
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1no object (of groups of atoms or cellular structures) join or coalesce.
      ‘the two nuclei move together and fuse into one nucleus’
      with object ‘attempts to fuse nuclei together’
      • ‘A more direct approach, for example, would be one in which two protons fuse to form a deuteron.’
      • ‘It demands a tenfold increase in temperature before it will fuse into heavier elements.’
      • ‘Solar neutrinos are produced when two protons fuse together to form a deuterium nucleus, a positron, and a neutrino.’
      • ‘Iron is the heaviest substance that a star can make in its life because heavier elements require more energy to fuse together than they release, so the star collapses.’
      • ‘At that point, deuterium atoms fuse together, the same way hydrogen atoms fuse in stars, releasing neutrons and energy in the process.’
      • ‘The heat and the continued enzymatic action of rennin cause the protein to fuse into stringlike filaments, making the curd denser.’
      • ‘The ascomycete fungi are haploid at all times other than when the gametes fuse to produce the zygote.’
      • ‘In sexually reproducing organisms two gametes fuse to form a zygote, which then develops into an adult.’
      • ‘These observations indicate that the MTOCs of the two haploid nuclei failed to fuse, remaining as microtubule nucleating centers.’
      • ‘Once the two desmids have joined, their cytoplasm fuses into a single diploid cell, the zygote, which encases itself in a thick wall.’
      • ‘Still other universes might resemble our own cosmos more closely, but have strong forces so much stronger than ours that all their hydrogen would fuse into helium early on.’
      • ‘Eventually, the dikaryon forms sexual sporangia in which the nuclei fuse into one, which then undergoes meiosis to form haploid spores, and the cycle is repeated.’
      • ‘They hypothesize that four hydrogen atoms fuse with each other in a series of reactions to form a single helium atom.’
      • ‘When the atoms fuse into a plasma they release energy that can be harnessed to generate electricity.’
      • ‘Gravity then squeezes them further, and the centers get still hotter, until the helium nuclei fuse into the nuclei of heavier atoms.’
      • ‘If conditions are right, protons and electrons then fuse into neutrons, creating a neutron star.’
      • ‘When vesicles arrive at their destination, they fuse into the target membrane.’
      • ‘The additional membrane is provided by intracellular vesicles, which fuse with the plasma membrane.’
      • ‘Over the first few weeks in the womb, they fuse into one.’
      • ‘When two sex cells fuse into one, the newly formed cell receives one chromosome from each of the parent cells.’
    2. 1.2 Melt (a material or object) with intense heat so as to join it with something else.
      ‘powdered glass was fused to a metal base’
      no object ‘when fired in a special kiln, the metals fused on to the pot’
      • ‘This means they have melted and fused together and onto your glass.’
      • ‘There are different techniques of enamelling and one of them is when a vitreous coating is fused on to a metallic surface.’
      • ‘Once fusion began, the two disks fused completely within 1.3 s into a single large disk.’
      • ‘You can't heat and fuse materials at about 2700 [degrees] F without a substantial fuel bill.’
      • ‘Or it can be tinted by fusing colorful glass to the back of the tile so that it appears to have depth but is also opaque - a feature that no other type of tile can duplicate.’
      • ‘These cells are filled with finely powdered glass paste, which is then fused to the metal in a furnace.’
      • ‘The printer then transfers the toner from the drum to the paper and applies intense heat to fuse the toner to the paper.’
      • ‘This core has an outer rind to 2 cm thick of pale yellow-green frothy glass grading outward to partially fused sand and gravel.’
      • ‘Next, the researchers placed the crystal-coated phages on a silicon surface and subjected them to a heat treatment that killed off the virus while fusing the crystals into a semi-conducting nanowire.’
      • ‘The searing heat also fuses the soil into an impermeable layer that increases runoff and stream sedimentation and slows the forest's ability to recover.’
      • ‘I could have gone in for a molar from Kolar or one where porcelain was fused to metal (nickel or chromium alloys typically).’
      • ‘Porcelain enamel is a specially formulated, highly durable glass permanently fused to metal under extremely high temperatures.’
      • ‘As the glaze melts in firing, it fuses with the decoration, forming a glossy surface that maintains the line quality of the surface decoration.’
      • ‘A solder ball is fused to the end of the conductors for connection of the connector to a circuit substrate.’
      bond, stick, join, attach, bind, integrate, weld, solder
      View synonyms
  • 2British no object (of an electrical appliance) stop working when a fuse melts.

    ‘the crew were left in darkness after the lights fused’
    • ‘This means that the tenant must clean the premises, mend the electric light if it is fused, unstop blocked sinks and generally do the little jobs about the place which a reasonable tenant would do.’
    • ‘This caused an very high electricity bill and it caused the electrical appliances in the community centre to fuse.’
    • ‘What it meant was that my heart's own electrical system had fused.’
    • ‘A Christmas window display in the shop of Messrs Tipping and Lee, coal merchants, Brook Street, Ilkley, was burned out through the fusing of an electric fairy light which formed part of the decorations.’
    • ‘By the time we got there it was twelve o'clock and wasn't very good, it was really loud in there that night, someone had spilt a pint over the DJ's equipment causing the amp to jam on full blast and the mixer to fuse.’
    • ‘That causes the lattice to vibrate and can ultimately induce changes in the microstructure that in turn cause a circuit to fail - the chip equivalent of a light-bulb filament fusing.’
    • ‘But soon afterwards the cellar light fused and I couldn't face going down there in the dark and the wine rack was soon buried in cardboard boxes and broken chairs and all the other junk that cellars accumulate.’
    • ‘The television electronics overloaded or fused or something and made some sparks, but Tom was standing right in front of it at the time.’
    short-circuit, burn out, stop working, trip, break
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1with object Cause (an electrical appliance) to stop working when a fuse melts.
      ‘he will fuse the entire lighting system of the camp’
      • ‘The fire seemed to go out, and so did everything in the whole house, as I'd fused all the electrics.’
      • ‘The fork scorched a huge hole in Demi's night dress, destroyed a TV and fused all the electricity outlets in the house.’
      • ‘The staff also bring the firm's own generator for electricity, but today the torrential rain has fused a plug.’
      • ‘If there are two ways to connect something, I will unerringly opt for the wrong one and fuse every electrical appliance in the street.’
      • ‘It was a tiny candle but for some reason it had fused the church's electrics.’
      • ‘Let's hope he leaves off the light switches at the Concert Hall as on his first visit to survey his new empire at Bothwell Sreet resulted in him fusing all the lights.’
      • ‘Then, all of a sudden the sound just stopped - it turned out that the amplifier had fused some circuits.’
  • 3with object Provide (a circuit or electrical appliance) with a fuse.

    ‘a fused plug’
    • ‘If there are not adequate receptacles, a fused and grounded power strip should be used instead of an ordinary extension cord.’
    • ‘Electronic toys should also carry this mark, and parents should ensure that full instructions accompany any item, and that plugs are properly wired and fused.’

noun

  • A safety device consisting of a strip of wire that melts and breaks an electric circuit if the current exceeds a safe level.

    • ‘Product groups include passive and electromechanical components, capacitors, resistive products, ferrites, fuses, inductors and filters.’
    • ‘The fuse structure may further include additional wiring over the electrical insulating layer at the same level as the fuse.’
    • ‘For spare carry a set of drive belts, hose pipes, loose electrical wire, insulation tape, extra fuses and coolant’
    • ‘The company, which supplies fuses to the electronics and car industry, has been in the town for more than 30 years.’
    • ‘If the demand for electrical current exceeds the safety level, a fuse opens once and must be replaced to reconnect the circuit.’
    • ‘But fuses are designed to break when a large electrical current passes through them, as those who owned homes before the invention of the circuit breaker might remember.’
    • ‘Other problems have included broken wires and incorrect fuses that have been replaced over the years.’
    • ‘Electrical systems still using fuses may work just fine.’
    • ‘At the main circuit panel, locate the circuit for your fan/light and either remove the fuse or switch the circuit breaker to the off position.’
    • ‘Turn the power off at the furnace or by removing the fuse or pulling the circuit breaker that runs the furnace fan.’
    • ‘Make sure the dryer is plugged into an outlet suitable for its electrical needs as overloaded electrical outlets can result in blown fuses or tripped circuit breakers.’
    • ‘Investigators found the inverters' internal fuses broken but not melted or burned, leading them to believe they were broken in flight.’
    • ‘Hopefully, the bulk of the work should consist of resetting circuit breakers and replacing fuses.’
    • ‘Shut off the breaker or remove the fuse for the fan circuit; and verify that it is off using a neon circuit tester.’
    • ‘Some appliances still work but an electrician spent most of yesterday checking wiring circuits and fuses.’
    • ‘The electromagnetic pulse generated by the test led to power surges in electrical cables in Hawaii, blowing fuses, streetlights, and circuit breakers.’
    • ‘We didn't even touch the fuses or wiring, so it must be something to do with the MOT that didn't show up all the time the bulb was disconnected.’
    • ‘I bought fuses for the power strips, but they popped immediately.’
    • ‘When the repairmen had done their work and departed, we broke the same fuses again and repeated the exercise with the other firms.’
    • ‘Although low resistance wire is more costly, it will save money in the long run by reducing power loss or blown fuses and will increase safety.’
    circuit breaker, trip switch, residual current device
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century: from Latin fus- ‘poured, melted’, from the verb fundere.

Pronunciation

fuse

/fjuːz/

Main definitions of fuse in English

: fuse1fuse2

fuse2

(North American fuze)

noun

  • 1A length of material along which a small flame moves to explode a bomb or firework, meanwhile allowing time for those who light it to move to a safe distance.

    ‘a bomb on a short fuse’
    • ‘The cellar was searched and, hidden amid the large quantity of firewood stored there, 36 barrels of gunpowder were found, along with fuses.’
    • ‘A former chemist trained Mr Roche and a Malaysian man in how to light fuses.’
    • ‘There was only a little difference in the length of their fuses, but it was enough that the last one went off a full second later than the first.’
    • ‘When the fuse was lit I placed it gently in an upright position, as far as I could in the van without actually going in it.’
    • ‘The explosion was triggered in a classroom where students, aged 9-11, were inserting fuses into fireworks that had been filled with gunpowder by older students.’
    • ‘Lighting a fuse, she tossed the object over the cliff, and it exploded in a fiery blast on impact, blowing several of the creatures away.’
    • ‘Those fireworks never made it into the sky; the drunkards spilled beer on them and the fuses wouldn't light.’
    • ‘Greek special forces have captured a freighter carrying 680 tons of explosives, along with detonators and fuses, bound for North Africa.’
    • ‘Fawkes's task was to light the slow fuse to ignite the barrels of gunpowder.’
    • ‘We are, perhaps literally, sitting on a bomb with a fuse of uncertain length.’
    • ‘The Warrior saw that the Hangman's human bombs had lit their fuses of dynamite.’
    • ‘The silly tension of passing along this bomb as the fuse slowly ticks away is great fun and adds much to the light spirit of the game.’
    • ‘Lit at one end, the small amount of gunpowder in the core of the fuse burned slowly along the length of the cord that surrounded it.’
    • ‘On the day of lift-off, Wan, splendidly attired, climbed into his rocket chair and forty seven servants lit the fuses and then hastily ran for cover.’
    • ‘That one night of every year Dad was the all-knowing and responsible adult, lighting the fuses and stepping back, while Mum tried to stop me from blowing my own limbs off.’
    • ‘In a show of machismo he allowed the fuse to burn down almost to the very last before his friends began to scarper.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, a fuse was burning; lit in Washington, it would explode here.’
    • ‘Also in his own statement (made on two occasions), he stated that he cupped the match whilst the fuse was being lit - albeit he considered that he made this statement under duress.’
    • ‘We only made them around Guy Fawkes as we could take the fuses from commercially made fireworks we bought and use them on the [censored] bombs.’
    • ‘And make propellant for fireworks, and make fuses to ignite the propellant to effectively disperse the oxides for very pretty fireworks!’
    1. 1.1 A device in a bomb that controls the timing of the explosion.
      • ‘The Ijuin fuze allowed the shell to explode on impact rather than after it had penetrated the armor of enemy ships.’
      • ‘POF have extensive facilities for the manufacture of fuzes, detonators, and primers as detailed below.’
      • ‘When the fuse is triggered, a conventional explosion causes the second subcritical mass to be propelled at a high velocity into the first subcritical mass.’
      • ‘If the arming wire has been accidentally pulled during handling, the fuzes shift to the option mode.’
      • ‘For instance, their Tellermine was fitted with screw sockets on the side and underneath to take various types of anti-lifting device, and anti-handling fuzes were issued.’
      • ‘The fuze initiates an explosive train in the projectile causing the projectile to produce the desired effects.’
      • ‘He then returned with the homemade bomb, which comprised plastic explosives packed into a plastic container and a motion-trigger fuse, said Mr Shears.’
      • ‘The new fuze will increase the ‘maximum efficiency’ significantly and give the British Trident submarines hard target kill capability for the first time.’
      • ‘The fuze is a self-powered, microprocessor controlled device and contains a radio frequency radar.’
      • ‘Typically, these fuzes rely on mechanical arming and firing to initiate explosive line charges used for clearing a breached path through a series of mines or obstacles.’
      • ‘When the time-delayed fuse is lit by pulling the pin, the powder burns, creating a deafening bang and a blinding flash.’
      • ‘A conventional bomb has a casing containing explosives, a detonation or ignition system, and an initiation device or fuse.’
      • ‘The new fuzes are easier to operate and more accurate and reliable than their predecessors.’
      • ‘What he doesn't know, of course is that he is the bomb, complete with remotely controlled fuse hidden somewhere in the car.’
      • ‘Shells, hollow ammunition filled with gunpowder and equipped with a fuse, were the most common type of explosive artillery round used during the Civil War.’
      • ‘Will the action of removing the fuse set off the explosive?’
      • ‘As the range of artillery increased, much longer delays time fuzes were necessary than could be provided by earlier designs such as the 5 second Bormann time fuze.’
      • ‘He had separated the fuse and the detonator from the plastic explosive.’
      • ‘Even this development necessitated the continued use of the proximity fuze in the control of its point of detonation.’
      • ‘Most of the shells landed in soft snow and were duds; only those that struck rock or ice would detonate - unless they were airburst shells, which have fuses timed to explode before they hit the ground.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Fit a fuse to (a bomb, shell, or mine)

    ‘the bomb was fused to go off during a charity performance’
    • ‘This round is fuzed with the M758 Point Detonating Self-Destruct fuze, developed and produced exclusively by Alliant Techsystems.’

Phrases

  • light the (or a) fuse

    • Do something that creates a tense or exciting situation.

      ‘his goal midway through the first half lit the fuse’
      • ‘The second intifada has lit a fuse in Belgium and Jews feel isolated and threatened.’
      • ‘This act of stoner generosity will almost single-handedly light the fuse of the psychedelic '60s.’
      • ‘His death lit the fuse on America's civil rights struggle.’
      • ‘Please find the spirit that set the spark that lit the fuse and brought the news of joy untold of young and old, lame and bold.’
      • ‘They were just ordinary kids, with extraordinary luck of being in Philadelphia at the moment the old town lit the fuse for the rock explosion.’
      • ‘The green saints improved on the re-start and Coadys goal lit the fuse as they slowly tugged away at the Ballinkillen lead and they had drawn level with ten minutes remaining with some great points from the roaming Declan Murphy.’
      • ‘He firmly supported the Solidarity trade union movement that was to liberate the Polish people and light the fuse of the Velvet Revolution in Czechoslovakia.’
      • ‘A television industry source says disgruntled local TV producers may have lit the fuse.’
      • ‘Someone lit the fuse in the 1960s, and the fallout was fantastic.’
      • ‘The Madras Army did not join the upheaval of 1857, but it had lit a fuse in Vellore.’
  • have (or be on) a short fuse

    • Have a tendency to lose one's temper quickly.

      ‘watch your tongue—he's got a very short fuse’
      • ‘On the pitch, his impatience, short fuse and a propensity for thuggishness underpinned a crudely effective football career, and on screen they have reinforced Vinnie's string of glowering heavies.’
      • ‘I was very violent; I had a really short fuse and, to be honest, I liked nothing better than a tear-up.’
      • ‘However, I have my weaknesses, and one of them is that I have a pretty short fuse when I think someone is questioning my limits.’
      • ‘The Conservative leader is formidable, a successful barrister with a good grasp of detail, albeit with a well-documented short fuse.’
      • ‘He now has a very short fuse so far as temper tantrums are concerned.’
      • ‘‘Yeah, I got a pretty short fuse,’ he admits, spreading his fingers on the table.’
      • ‘I wouldn't say that I had a particularly short fuse, but when I tried reasonable explanation and it got unreasonably brushed aside, I used to find it difficult to control my frustration.’
      • ‘I cut kids a lot of slack, because, whatever, they're 5 years old, but I have a very short fuse, at least internally, with people who should know better.’
      • ‘A situation where an old bloke, really a rather nice old bloke if it were not for his short fuse, is operated upon by all the things that can go wrong in modern life, and complains, loudly, but always comes out worse is bound to appeal to me.’
      • ‘When she went into the witness box during the trial, despite repeated suggestions from the prosecution that she had lied, she showed no sign of the short fuse Luke told a psychiatrist he had inherited from his mother.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from Italian fuso, from Latin fusus ‘spindle’.

Pronunciation

fuse

/fjuːz/