Definition of furtive in English:

furtive

adjective

  • 1Attempting to avoid notice or attention, typically because of guilt or a belief that discovery would lead to trouble; secretive.

    ‘they spent a furtive day together’
    ‘he stole a furtive glance at her’
    • ‘For the philosopher Roland Barthes, the power of furtive photography stems from its ability to disclose part of its subject's subconscious.’
    • ‘Usually this would prompt me to snort: how about the homosexual church officials who preach this stuff in public while leading furtive double lives?’
    • ‘She cast a furtive glance over her shoulder and caught a glimpse of Alex's dejected and sullen expression.’
    • ‘Someone else appears to be indulging in a furtive attempt to see what they can get away with.’
    • ‘When their meal arrived, he forgot about them and did not notice the furtive glances the two reclusive men cast their way, although he glanced idly at them when they left the tavern.’
    • ‘Micromounters are looked upon as some sort of secret society that does furtive things under microscopes for inexplicable reasons.’
    • ‘After a furtive glance toward his father, Jeremy answered it.’
    • ‘Taking a furtive glance around for his father, Joe considered his next move.’
    • ‘For her part, Christine noticed the partially furtive glances, and it saddened her more than she would've cared to admit.’
    • ‘Picking up his briefcase, he headed towards the police station, noticing a little more furtive activity today than usual.’
    • ‘He cast a furtive glance around the square and, seeing that his admirer had not yet gone away, bent over his boot again.’
    • ‘I took a furtive look around, digested the unfamiliar surroundings, and backtracked.’
    • ‘He cast furtive glances out of the corner of his eye, looking for Kathleen but couldn't seem to spot her.’
    • ‘And they do not want male waiters casting furtive looks and breathing down their necks.’
    • ‘I could see that he took a couple of furtive glances at what I was doing, but he wasn't really watching.’
    • ‘We may as well have been poker players, there were so many furtive glances.’
    • ‘While lord of the castle, he longs for useful work such as he did at the forge, but even his furtive attempts to fix a castle lock are foiled.’
    • ‘As over the wounds of hurt pride and battered citizenship do thousands of furtive conservatives ‘furiously blog’ (in Book's phrase).’
    • ‘I didn't miss the furtive glance he cast around to check if anyone was looking.’
    • ‘There is something in a furtive glance of eyes on the subway, or from the passing crowd that does not tend to permanence.’
    secretive, secret, surreptitious
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Suggestive of guilty nervousness.
      ‘the look in his eyes became furtive’
      • ‘The ferocious snarl of the Tyrannosaurus Rex has been replaced by a furtive shameful glance.’
      • ‘It's almost unbearably tempting to suggest a furtive flick on the nose.’
      • ‘He casts a furtive, almost embarrassed glance around the nearby area.’
      • ‘Arnold, even as he issues obligatory denials, is, unlike Bill, neither furtive nor guilty.’
      • ‘The word furtive might have been invented to describe his dodgy demeanour.’
      • ‘But his gaze was not nervous or furtive but controlling, establishing a zone that she was not to enter.’
      • ‘Instead it's a candid admission he once lived the furtive lifestyle of a sinister international beer villain.’
      • ‘There was nothing furtive or nervous about him - it was as if he was perfectly entitled to be there.’
      • ‘From the positions of the heads and eyes, do they look honest and straightforward, shy, or furtive and untrustworthy?’
      • ‘There was a sudden wave of tittering from my daughter's classmates and furtive looks.’
      • ‘The look the officer had given Ian had been furtive, almost guilty, and Ian sensed disapproval in the man's silence.’
      • ‘The two exchanged furtive glances in slight panic at this last comment.’

Origin

Early 17th century: from French furtif, -ive or Latin furtivus, from furtum ‘theft’.

Pronunciation

furtive

/ˈfəːtɪv/