Definition of fungibility in English:

fungibility

noun

Law
  • See fungible

    • ‘Some argue, however, that the threat from terrorist organizations abroad and the fungibility of money require adjustments to the constitutional prohibition on guilt by association.’
    • ‘But Keynes and White also recognized that countries would have difficulties in making their controls on capital outflows fully effective because of the fungibility and mobility of money.’
    • ‘But the fact of fungibility suggests that aid-giving could be greatly simplified if most took the form of unconditional balance-of-payments support.’
    • ‘It has multiple aspects, including the denial of autonomy and subjectivity and the ideas of ownership, fungibility (one is just like the others), and violability (it's all right to break the thing up or abuse it).’
    • ‘Ultimately, the fungibility of money, and the ubiquity of the state in providing services and setting ground rules, together mean that there is no such thing as a ‘mere’ decision not to subsidize an activity.’
    • ‘For program lending, which fungibility made into budget support, conditionality was meaningless.’
    • ‘The variables or factors included in the function represent fungibility, perishability, substitutability, global market factors, and factors that help evade sanctions, respectively.’
    • ‘We know that a considerable amount of the excise tax does not go to the roading fund, and it is the fungibility of money that is the problem.’
    • ‘But there is no obstacle in principle to finding a trust, despite the fungibility of its subject matter, so long as the intention to create a trust is clear.’
    • ‘A proliferation of fuel specifications has been imposed on an inflexible distribution system, reducing the global and regional fungibility of refined oil products.’

Pronunciation

fungibility

/fʌn(d)ʒɪˈbɪlɪti/