Definition of full house in English:

full house

noun

  • 1An audience that fills the venue for an event to capacity.

    ‘he seemed a trifle unnerved playing to a full house’
    • ‘Also tomorrow night, Danny Moss and Roy Williams, who draw rave revues and full houses around the world, come to the Shire Hall, Howden.’
    • ‘It remains daunting to walk out and face a full house, with all the balconies filled, but this is my fifth time, and there are no more nerves.’
    • ‘Despite the horrendous weather, there was a full house for Love of a Good Man at the Union Theatre on Tuesday night.’
    • ‘There was a full house at this event last year and the same is expected this year, so let's make every effort to be there for such an important cause.’
    • ‘The theatre had no capital, its staff had no job security, and the capacity of the venue meant that even full houses yielded only small margins.’
    • ‘The audiences in Stuttgart were good, with full houses.’
    • ‘It first toured last autumn and played to full houses across the country and was highly praised by audience members and critics alike.’
    • ‘The full houses and positive critical reviews indicate that theatre audiences are in a mood to be entertained and this comedy wont disappoint.’
    • ‘The event draws a full house each year and big support is expected for the venture this coming Sunday.’
    • ‘The full house on opening night loved the production, and clapped until the trio returned to the stage to take their bows again.’
    • ‘If the Guildhall Orchestra can get nearly full houses then it is abundantly clear that the BBC Philharmonic would get capacity audiences.’
    • ‘While figures have yet to be quantified, press officer Norah Norton reported a ‘significant increase on last year in the number of full houses - in all venues’.’
    • ‘This Thursday sees Sean Keane return once again to this popular venue and a full house is expected as usual for this artist.’
    • ‘Phillip was very pleased with the success of the event over the seven-day period, which had full houses for each show.’
    • ‘What a pity that less than 2,000 people were at the Manchester Evening News Arena to see it - Brodie's ability, and capacity to excite, deserves a full house every time.’
    • ‘Some shows had not expected full houses as they were catering for niche audiences.’
    • ‘Seven bands from Winchester and district exploded on to the music scene and entertained a full house at the St Paul's Hill venue with new sounds and energetic performances.’
    • ‘Yet, so insensitively thrill-seeking are critics and audiences that LaBute garners rave reviews and full houses.’
    • ‘Cafes are perpetually full, and even performances that start at 10 P.M. draw full houses and leave audiences chatting animatedly way past midnight.’
    • ‘It was opening night, a full house except for three seats in the front row, and it hit one of the three empty seats.’
  • 2A poker hand with three of a kind and a pair, which beats a flush and loses to four of a kind.

    • ‘Four-of-a-kind beats full house, but the Victor remains impassive.’
    • ‘Since he didn't re-raise, I was even more confident that he didn't already have a full house.’
    • ‘What were the odds on such a situation (straight flush against a full house, heads up) occurring?’
    • ‘In the first hour of the five-day tournament, the champ's three aces lost to a full house.’
    • ‘When comparing full houses, the rank of the three cards determines which is higher.’
    • ‘When a player has a wild card in hand, he in effect has an extra card to use in filling in a straight or full house or flush.’
    • ‘Further, the odds against the initial deal yielding over two full houses are a respectably short 1.7-to - 1.’
    • ‘They choose poker because it is easily available over the internet, and is fun and straightforward, once the basics of flushes and full houses are sorted out.’
    • ‘Note that this was a short hand; normally one doesn't see a full house and four of a kind go heads up like that.’
    • ‘In the meantime, if you want to play that game, look for one that pays 45 for a full house with a five-coin bet.’
    • ‘They say ‘A good flush beats a full house every time’.’
    • ‘If one player has a straight, we can't beat that for high, but presumably some of the other players are drawing live to flushes or full houses or bigger straights.’
    • ‘If you win the middle hand with a full house, you receive 2 units instead of 1 for that hand.’
    • ‘I'd be furious if I had a flush and lost to a mere full house in this game.’
    • ‘I ended up losing $70, mostly on the one hand where my full house got beat by quads on the river.’
    • ‘The next most valuable hand is four of a kind, then full house, flush, straight, three of a kind, two pair, and one pair.’
    • ‘The most important things to look for are the payoffs for a full house and for two pair, but some casinos are subtler, cutting other payoffs, so it's important to check the entire schedule.’
    • ‘Chances are good that the trips will be beat by a full house, a flush, or a straight.’
    • ‘As between two full houses, the winner is the hand whose three of a kind consists of higher value cards, or, between full houses which have the same three of a kind set, the hand with the higher value pair.’
    • ‘She gets two full houses and now a straight flush!’
    1. 2.1A winning card at bingo in which all the numbers have been successfully marked off.
      ‘eyes down for a full house!’
      • ‘George Glover, 67, who lives in Selby, achieved a full house in 39 numbers on the national bingo game to win the cash prize at the Mecca Club in York.’
      • ‘There is 2,700 on offer at the Roundfort bingo this Wednesday night with prizes of 70 on all full houses plus 1,000 on the jackpot games as well as valuable prizes on the raffle.’

Pronunciation:

full house

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