Definition of full beam in English:

full beam

noun

British
  • [mass noun] The brightest setting of a vehicle's headlights:

    ‘his headlights were on full beam’
    • ‘The side-lights seemed to be working and with them on full beam I could see where I was going, but it was slightly weird to have had sudden and simultaneous headlight failure.’
    • ‘As it is possible to see double the distance on full beam as compared to dipped headlights, it is better to drive with full beam unless required otherwise, you are told.’
    • ‘A fair number of cars were still driving back from Wellington and for some reason many were driving on full beam.’
    • ‘With dive lights on full beam we followed the curve of the ship until a flaking ridge of steel gave us our first indication of the wreck's position.’
    • ‘The objective was to shine my full beam where I thought I'd seen the car.’
    • ‘He put on his full beam and then saw a person lying on the road.’
    • ‘With wipers, horn and full beam controls mounted on the steering wheel, indicators to your right and gearbox to your left, you rarely need to leave the steering wheel, definitely a good thing given how at one with the car you become.’
    • ‘She said the prosecution case rested on whether or not Liversage should have put on his full beam headlights.’
    • ‘When on, the light switches from a high intensity full beam to low beam depending on the user's preference.’
    • ‘Rush hour comes, with more beeping, young drivers overtaking in unbelievable places, buses blinding you with their full beam lights on, and traffic jams everywhere.’
    • ‘He told the court a car came round a bend with full beam headlights on which blinded him, and within a second, a dark object fell into the side of his car.’
    • ‘The silver Mini Cooper drove smoothly down the darkened tunnel with its full beam headlights on at 30 mph.’
    • ‘On full beam they are hugely bright, but dip them and it's like they've gone out.’
    • ‘The most important new rule introduced with the amendments is that motorists are to be obliged between October 1 and March 31 to drive with headlights on, but not necessarily on full beam, even in daytime.’
    • ‘Thanks to evolutionary optimisation techniques we have been able to search for full beam configurations, that is, beam intensity, beam shape and especially beam orientation.’
    • ‘I squeeze my eyes shut as the harsh, electrical light flicks on full beam in the room.’
    • ‘I'm not sure the shop behind her was too keen either on me managing to put the headlights on full beam.’
    • ‘The reasoning here being that I would see the full beam headlights of any other vehicles in the distance and have plenty of time to slow down.’
    • ‘For some unknown reason I'm frequently blinded on dual carriageways by morons who seem to believe that because they're on a wider road than normal they can use their full beam regardless of oncoming traffic on the other carriageway.’
    • ‘We're heading to Gilling East, near Helmsley - the full beam of the car headlights guiding our way along the snaking B1223.’

Pronunciation:

full beam

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