Definition of fruit in English:

fruit

noun

  • 1The sweet and fleshy product of a tree or other plant that contains seed and can be eaten as food:

    ‘tropical fruits such as mangoes and papaya’
    [mass noun] ‘eat plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables’
    • ‘Upon entering the room the sweetest smell of fresh fruits and warm pastries flooded their senses, followed by the smell of cooked bacon.’
    • ‘Libran foods and plants include many fruits - strawberry, peach, apple, autumn berries.’
    • ‘Begin to buy whole-grain products and fresh fruits and vegetables.’
    • ‘If you plant the seed of a sweet fruit such as an orange, it will grow as an orange tree and produce oranges.’
    • ‘You will be able to enjoy fresh vegetables, fruits, or sweets accompanied with a light soda or sparking water.’
    • ‘Your baby requires vitamin C for tissue growth, while your body needs it to absorb iron and other important nutrients, so increase your intake of fresh fruits and vegetables.’
    • ‘Historically this has been an area for producing table grapes (along with other tree fruits such as cherries).’
    • ‘Include lots of green leafy vegetables and sweet juicy fruits.’
    • ‘A meal is usually followed by fresh fruits or sweets.’
    • ‘Eat high-fiber foods, such as fresh fruits and vegetables, brans and whole grains.’
    • ‘The Burmese enjoy spicy foods and they favor fruits over processed sweets.’
    • ‘Whole fresh fruits, dried fruits and packaged pre-cut vegetables are easy snacks to take with you.’
    • ‘The abundance of pawpaw trees, whose fruit tastes like banana custard, amplifies the tropical effect.’
    • ‘As the lemurs digest the fleshy fruit, the seed is passed through their system, normally away from the parent tree.’
    • ‘Make a welcoming display in your hallway with bowls of fresh fruit, candles, sweets and wreaths.’
    • ‘China's food exports, often very competitively priced, include fresh and processed fruits, vegetables, seafood and meat.’
    • ‘The food eaten may be oysters, fresh fruit or vegetables, water, ice, or bakery products.’
    • ‘The variety of edible products carried on rolling stores included soda pop, fresh fruits, and vegetables.’
    • ‘Unlike mangoes and other tropical fruits, a diverse community of fig trees provides food year - round.’
    • ‘Because it contains high levels of salt, Josie should eat potassium-rich foods, such as fresh fruits and vegetables, as well as drink lots of water.’
    1. 1.1Botany The seed-bearing structure of a plant, e.g. an acorn.
      • ‘Every 12 h during the period of prolonged darkness, samples of young leaves, flowers, roots and fruits from two plants were harvested for analysis.’
      • ‘The proportion of flowers and ovules that develop into fruits and seeds in flowering plants rarely reaches 1.’
      • ‘Stained cells corresponding to immature xylem were detected in vascular bundles of flowers and fruits.’
      • ‘A wide variety of organs from various plant species were analysed: roots, stems, hypocotyls, leaves, fruits, and petioles.’
      • ‘Most of the major food crops of the world are highly sensitive to soil salinity; they show reduced growth rate and yield, and may have stunted fruits, leaves and stems.’
    2. 1.2archaic, literary Natural produce that can be used for food:
      ‘we give thanks for the fruits of the earth’
      • ‘Isn't it wonderful that the fruit of the earth tastes good to us, nourishes us.’
      • ‘In man's natural state the earth and its fruits had belonged to no one and hence to all.’
      • ‘From the vineyards of France to the olive groves of Spain, hundreds of thousands of people will be toasting the fruits of the earth this autumn, and you can join them.’
      • ‘Most wineries have picnic benches or grassy areas with views of the vineyard and the best part is, you can buy a bottle of wine right there and enjoy the fruits of the field.’
    3. 1.3the fruits" or "the fruit The result or reward of work or activity:
      ‘the pupils began to appreciate the fruits of their labours’
      • ‘They need to get with the program and start enjoying the fruits of imperial labor.’
      • ‘Have you never experienced the fruits of my rewards?’
      • ‘That means I am attached to the results, to the fruits.’
      • ‘The contest between capital and labour over the fruits of economically productive activity remains the front line struggle.’
      • ‘Americans are still expecting to see the fruits of George W Bush's promised tax cuts trickle down over the next few years.’
      • ‘It became evident in the select committee some weeks ago that there was an enormous risk that North Shore City would be denied the fruits of the results of the High Court decision.’
      • ‘It was their just reward last week to see the fruits of their labour come to fruition and be recognised.’
      • ‘Our right is only over our actions, not over the fruits of the actions.’
      • ‘Exporters will reap the fruits of their labour.’
      • ‘By associating with IPRS, they enjoy the fruits of its activism.’
      • ‘Technique, as always, is crucial to reaping the fruits of your labors.’
      • ‘My parents do all the work while I enjoy the fruits of their labor.’
      • ‘Photography remained a private activity, the fruits of which were stored in over 150 albums - 14,500 pages of images.’
      • ‘I got total pleasure from watching people's reaction as they enjoyed the fruits my labor.’
      reward, benefit, advantages
      product, produce, profit, return, yield, legacy, issue, deserts
      outcome, upshot, result, results, consequences, effect, effects
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4archaic Offspring:
      ‘I've brought along the fruit of my loins’
      ‘she couldn't bear not to see the fruit of her womb’
      • ‘Blessed are you and blessed are all the fruits of your womb.’
      • ‘Your word assures me that you bless the fruit of my womb and that neither myself nor my husband shall be barren.’
      • ‘Mary is blessed among women, and blessed is the fruit of her womb.’
      children, sons and daughters, progeny, family, youngsters, babies, brood
      View synonyms
  • 2North American informal, offensive A male homosexual.

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • (of a tree or other plant) produce fruit:

    ‘the trees fruit very early’
    ‘cover strawberries with cloches to encourage early fruiting’
    • ‘A standard apple tree usually takes two years to start fruiting and four years to reach full production.’
    • ‘In annual plants, which die after fruiting, there is no need to keep anything in reserve.’
    • ‘Linum began fruiting by late May, ending by early July.’
    • ‘My two plants at work produced another 3 ripe peppers between them last week and are flowering and fruiting again!’
    • ‘‘Beth’ is a good, reliable cropper that starts fruiting freely at an early age, coming into season in September.’
    • ‘But then by this time last year the roses were still flowering, and the strawberries were still fruiting.’
    • ‘I brought two pepper plants which were still fruiting into the house, and put the rest on the compost heap.’
    • ‘Flowering or fruiting shrubs can be pruned according to whether they flower in spring or summer.’
    • ‘The tree will fruit only in a subtropical or tropical climate where there is a distinct dry season.’
    • ‘In an annual such as Arabidopsis, flowering is irreversible, global, and leads to fruiting and plant death.’
    • ‘After this period, the mycelia need to be forced into fruiting, usually by placing the kit in the refrigerator.’
    • ‘Planting strawberries in rows one plant wide will help sunlight penetrate the entire plant and increase fruiting.’
    • ‘You can also grow several flowering and fruiting shrubs in sturdy, roomy tubs.’
    • ‘A botanist from the University of Bradford has discovered a rare plant fruiting for the first time in more than 130 years.’
    • ‘A deck presents a neighborly face to the street and offers a view of native plants and fruiting shrubs.’
    • ‘Do no more pruning on a young tree than is absolutely needed or you will delay fruiting.’
    • ‘The plants are looking sadder now, but still fruiting like mad.’
    • ‘It was also time to deal with the strawberry plants, which have stopped fruiting.’
    • ‘Plants can bear flowers and fruits at the same time, and die after fruiting.’
    • ‘If you're going to plant a holly, make sure you have space for not just one but two bushes in your garden; a male and female form must be planted as fruiting only occurs on female plants.’
    produce fruit, bear fruit
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • the fruit of the vine

    • literary Grapes.

      • ‘We know that by Islamic law they are barred from the fruit of the vine and juice of the barley, all properly aged.’
      • ‘We can bottle the fruit of the vine and distribute it among those whom we like to see at our table.’
      • ‘Today is turning out to be beautifully warm, and since I'm going to a party on a boat tonight, my thoughts naturally turn towards the fruit of the vine (specifically, white wine).’
      • ‘I can't drink, but I know God blesses other people through the fruit of the vine…’
      • ‘When he returns to establish the kingdom of God, those who have faithfully followed his commandments will be invited to drink of the fruit of the vine with him.’
      • ‘Here, you can spend long, lazy days sampling the fruit of the vine, lolling over long lunches outside, playing golf, cycling or touring the historic sites and museums.’
      • ‘The French wines promotion was held March 13 in the Foodland car-park on Pattaya Central Road with hundreds of wine enthusiasts both Thai and foreign arriving to taste the fruit of the vine.’
      • ‘So, with a great amount of respect, I'll let those like Connie and Rex do what they do best, while I promise to stick to doing what I do best - appreciating the fruit of the vine.’
      • ‘It takes a certain amount of difficulty to bring out the best in the fruit of the vine.’
      • ‘His only son was also no stranger to the fruit of the vine, and didn't he make wine the symbol of his blood, ensuring hundreds of millions of Catholics would know its taste long before they turned the legal drinking age?’
  • in fruit

    • (of a tree or plant) at the stage of producing fruit:

      ‘the cranberry is always attractive in fruit’
      • ‘The tree is in fruit from October to April, which corresponds with the great greens' breeding season.’
      • ‘Seven plants were observed in fruit on the date of collection.’
      • ‘If you plant an apple tree or a lemon tree, you know it'll be in fruit at a certain time.’
      • ‘The secret to telling these two trees apart, when not in fruit, is to examine the leaves.’
      • ‘Opuntia humifusa, which we'd seen flowering in June, was in fruit, as was Lechea mucronata.’
      • ‘The plants were in fruit on this date, and some showed signs of seed predation.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, from Latin fructus enjoyment of produce, harvest, from frui enjoy, related to fruges fruits of the earth, plural (and most common form) of frux, frug- fruit.

Pronunciation

fruit

/fruːt/