Definition of from in English:

from

Pronunciation /frɒm//frəm/

preposition

  • 1Indicating the point in space at which a journey, motion, or action starts.

    ‘she began to walk away from him’
    ‘I leapt from my bed’
    figurative ‘he was turning the Chamberlain government away from appeasement’
    • ‘Regular buses from Saranda make the journey, or you can haggle a price with a taxi driver.’
    • ‘The Russian Soyuz is now the only ship capable of carrying crew to and from the space outpost.’
    • ‘Not that you're bothered, but my journey to and from work is a two bus affair.’
    • ‘It took the Councillor two hours to make the journey from Bury to Ramsbottom.’
    • ‘Journeys to and from one of the hospitals will have to be made on the second and third journey of the ticket.’
    • ‘Bear in mind there's a lengthy one hour plus taxi journey from the airport into town.’
    • ‘The final treat of the day was when our driver rose from the table and motioned for me to join him.’
    • ‘The main journey I make is from Woodthorpe to Rawcliffe, where my girlfriend lives.’
    • ‘We used to stop there at least four times a year in my childhood on the journeys to and from each grandmother.’
    • ‘The local rivals make the short journey across the border from Lancashire today.’
    • ‘Amazingly, it took only five months for the Altea to make the journey from prototype to showroom.’
    • ‘My Saturday evening journey from Kings Cross to York took no less than six hours!’
    • ‘The problems all occurred on the last leg of the journey from London Paddington back to Didcot.’
    • ‘My observation is that only a small number of cars move from their spaces during the working day.’
    • ‘Car journeys to and from the site would also be increased if the expansion was given the go-ahead.’
    • ‘She got a bad feeling in her stomach as she slowly got up from her bed and walked back to the stairs.’
    • ‘It's a five hour journey from Chichester, with train changes at Reading and Crewe.’
    • ‘It was also said that one leg of a planned flight involved a journey from Manchester.’
    • ‘It would not be possible for the Met not to be changed by the journey from Lawrence.’
    • ‘It's only one of many benefits to sharing the driving on your regular journey to and from work.’
    1. 1.1 Indicating the distance between a particular place and another place used as a point of reference.
      ‘the ambush occurred 50 metres from a checkpoint’
      • ‘Scores shall be determined according to the distance of the arrows from the flag stick.’
      • ‘Who measured the distance from Earth to Mars and did they have to make sure the tape measure was rigid?’
      • ‘I then measured an equal distance from both sides and marked the area to be cut out.’
      • ‘More than ever it's a question we must face, standing at a distance from the photocopier.’
      • ‘A site on Infirmary Road was rejected because of its distance from the city centre.’
      • ‘It is five miles from St Andrews and a similar distance from a variety of beaches and scenic towns.’
      • ‘The car was seen by police a couple of hours later only a short distance from Mr Graiezevsky's road.’
      • ‘The word sin was originally an archery term, being a unit of distance from the bull's eye.’
      • ‘We often go to Hohai lake, which is walking distance from here and part of the old imperial grounds.’
      • ‘Other sanctuaries of Demeter in Greece were located at some distance from town centres.’
      • ‘He said they were now staying a short distance from their home in a flat on the Down's Road.’
      • ‘This leaves her with a loss of feeling in her limbs and means she has to use the car to travel any distance from her home.’
      • ‘The length measured, using a ruler, was the distance from the base to the first flower on the stem.’
      • ‘It is a tool which can be used to design the network with the check on distances from three points.’
      • ‘The car would need to travel only a short distance from the car park to pick up a fare.’
  • 2Indicating the point in time at which a particular process, event, or activity starts.

    ‘the show will run from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m’
  • 3Indicating the source or provenance of someone or something.

    ‘I'm from Hackney’
    ‘she rang him from the hotel’
    ‘she demanded the keys from her husband’
    • ‘You can go here and see images from his motion work and also some clips, but not many.’
    • ‘It is also called the Cork Tree, as an inferior cork is processed from its corky bark.’
    • ‘Top performers from all over the area have been brought together for the show.’
    • ‘I am not in a position to indicate what roads will be funded from that source in the year.’
    • ‘If they showed pictures of meetings, people would get ideas from other sources.’
    • ‘He added that another appeal of the furniture was that it was sourced from sustainable forests.’
    • ‘Their identities have not been released but police sources say they are from Rayleigh.’
    • ‘They have to get funding from somewhere, these sources for funds have to be big, and so have to be noticed.’
    • ‘Analysts often use prices from various markets as indicators of potential events.’
    • ‘The event is run under the watchful eye of troops from the Royal Artillery Display Troop.’
    • ‘Therefore it is better to drink from a known and trusted source, rather than from a suspect bottle.’
    • ‘Let's observe our rights to support both teams whatever part of this fine island you are from.’
    • ‘The rest of the cash is being met by funds raised through the parish itself and grant money from other sources.’
    • ‘In the event of objections from members of the public, the consent would be subject to a public inquiry.’
    • ‘This translation from a medieval Anglo-Norman source gives a less cynical view on it.’
    • ‘I only hope the logs used were from a renewable source, because man, there were a lot of 'em.’
    • ‘The event is organised by volunteers from the library to raise money to spend on community facility.’
    • ‘I must agree with Mr Derbyshire that clean energy from renewable sources is the way forward.’
    • ‘Money from any fundraising events in the pipeline will go towards extra items and running costs.’
    • ‘Now his rescue bids have earned him a top life-saving award from the Royal Humane Society.’
    1. 3.1 Indicating the date at which something was created.
      ‘a document dating from the thirteenth century’
      • ‘Customers are invited to pick up a copy of the brochure from the box office from that date.’
      • ‘He also tips a wink to counterparts in the brewing trade from centuries ago.’
      • ‘It survives for us as a small, dark, fascinating vignette from the fourteenth century.’
      • ‘Many episodes from the late nineteenth century exemplify the crisis of liberalism.’
      • ‘An old man with a walnut face and brocade robes rode by, seemingly from the last century.’
      • ‘The oldest securely dated complete Korans we possess date only from the ninth century.’
  • 4Indicating the starting point of a specified range on a scale.

    ‘men who ranged in age from seventeen to eighty-four’
    • ‘Reviews were mixed, ranging from two stars in the Guardian to four in the film magazine Empire.’
    • ‘Up to ten children at a time would be housed overnight, with ages ranging from six weeks to five years.’
    • ‘If we have a scale from one to ten, what are we going to do if we meet someone who is a twelve?’
    • ‘The timescales allowed to complete the recommendations ranges from two to five years.’
    • ‘Injuries range from serious lacerations to major fractures and head and spinal injuries.’
    • ‘Anyone with a few hours to spare can join, and the current volunteers range in age from 18 up.’
    • ‘With prices ranging from a few rupees to a few hundred, the lamps make for a memorable buy.’
    • ‘The types of incidents the team deal with ranges from high to low level cases.’
    1. 4.1 Indicating one extreme in a range of conceptual variations.
      ‘anything from geography to literature’
      • ‘These range from stained glass and masonry through to steam engines and historic aircraft.’
      • ‘Five bands wowed the crowds with musical styles ranging from country and western to rock and jazz.’
      • ‘It contains a range of 120 ideas from chicken and noodle bake to a simple tuna sandwich.’
      • ‘Mourners ranged from the very young to pensioners who had lived their entire lives in the village.’
      • ‘If found guilty, they face sanctions ranging from a small fine to being stripped of their posts.’
      • ‘They range from banker masons skilled in the hand carving of stone to experts in materials testing.’
      • ‘Activities at the youth group include everything from sporting events to weekends away.’
      • ‘It has developed into a full flute choir incorporating the entire flute range from piccolo to bass.’
      • ‘The exhibition features all things foodie from specialist ranges to top booze.’
      • ‘Its severity can range from a minor inconvenience to a fatal rhythm disturbance.’
      • ‘All the tracks are original compositions and the music ranges from folk to acoustic jazz.’
      • ‘Is there a scale running from Not Believable to This Character is Now a Real Person?’
      • ‘This ranges from casual remarks to serious agitation by the xenophobic right.’
      • ‘AgriPower has developed a ‘virtual landfill’ system that can produce electricity and heat by burning anything from nuts to old tires.’
      • ‘Each band had a mere ten minutes to show off their talent and music ranged from rock to punk and nu-metal.’
      • ‘Attacks ranged from verbal abuse and being spat on to being pelted with stones and shot at with airguns.’
      • ‘The ideas range from the highly plausible to the vaguely intriguing to the obviously crackpot.’
      • ‘It is among the largest in the country, ranging from farms to gold mines, gravel pits to forests.’
      by, made by, done by, carried out by, caused by, from, in, of
      View synonyms
  • 5Indicating the point at which an observer is placed.

    ‘you can see the island from here’
    figurative ‘the ability to see things from another's point of view’
    • ‘What from a distance looked as if it may be a village turned out to be a huge rubbish dump.’
    • ‘Officers believe that from a distance, the mast would appear to be a lighting column.’
    • ‘But a menace we have until now seen only from a distance has stepped right up to face us.’
    • ‘Christmas arrived and with it frost and snow on the mainland mountains visible from the island.’
    • ‘I guess it must take a view from afar to observe what a self serving First Minister is.’
    • ‘She got so close to her face that from a distance it could have looked like they were smooching.’
    • ‘If you were able to see the Great Wall from space, you'd be able to see the bloody motorway system.’
    • ‘He says you must stand back and look at the tree from a distance to get an idea how tall it is.’
    • ‘Eyed from a distance, the steaks look spectacular as did the rugged, chunky chips.’
    • ‘The launches were observed from both sides and have no writing or identification marks on them.’
    • ‘When you look at pictures of the earth from space the effect is even greater.’
    • ‘He picked the place so he could observe the convoy from up close with his optic probe.’
    • ‘I am watching this drama unfold from a distance, but in a weird way I feel so close to it.’
    • ‘The best place to view the giant from a distance is from a wide lay-by, just outside the village.’
    • ‘How many people could look at power from such close quarters and not grab it with both hands?’
    • ‘As this had been dug into limestone, the mound would have been clearly visible from a distance.’
    • ‘Newman watched events unfold from his perch in front of the computer screens.’
    • ‘On occasions I have waited and watched from a distance to see if anyone comes running to answer it.’
    • ‘It means not shedding flakes that are visible to other people from a distance of two feet.’
    • ‘It's amazing to see the island from the waters, all classic hazy blue layers of skyscrapers.’
  • 6Indicating the raw material out of which something is manufactured.

    ‘a paint made from a natural resin’
    • ‘Here is something more than raw material from which a successful literature was forged.’
    • ‘These can be manufactured from arable crops like oil seed rape and sugar beet.’
  • 7Indicating separation or removal.

    ‘the party was ousted from power after sixteen years’
    • ‘What the coup plotters wanted and still want is to take power away from the people.’
    • ‘I think what stands out the most from the two journeys is the attitude of the staff on the trains.’
    • ‘They were showered in debris as the house collapsed and Amanda was separated from her party.’
    • ‘His removal from command of the army he had forged had a calamitous effect on the morale of his men.’
    • ‘Second, there has been the removal of proposed housing from the Blackfriars area.’
    • ‘That would be a really interesting way to erode power from the nation state.’
    • ‘This was a deeply formative experience, dividing the fate of the island from the mainland.’
    • ‘Imagine if, in December, the Board of Deputies case results in my removal from office.’
    • ‘They were the fabulous people responsible for the removal of the ads from this page!’
    • ‘For nearly a decade a group of people exiled from power during the Clinton years had been making plans.’
    • ‘They were taken from their natural parents and put in foster care, and some were even adopted.’
    • ‘The first offense will result in disqualification of the shooter from the event.’
    • ‘This is despite regular spraying and the removal of diseased leaves from bush and ground.’
    • ‘He is also sceptical about the removal of minimum-wage workers from the tax net.’
    • ‘It's goal is the removal of individual bias from determining the nature of reality.’
    • ‘It had been the longest separation from the hills I'd suffered since I broke my ankle.’
    • ‘I shall be absent from this space for the next six weeks, so a happy Christmas to all of you.’
    • ‘The unique advantage of democracy is that it can remove such people from power.’
    • ‘Far from devolving decision making to local communities it would take power away from them.’
    • ‘Drivers come steaming up here all the time just to cut a few minutes from their journey.’
  • 8Indicating prevention.

    ‘the story of how he was saved from death’
    • ‘The campaign and the Trust were acclaimed for helping save City from the threat of extinction.’
    • ‘What a sad fate for the nation that saved the world from fascism just 60 years ago.’
    • ‘A top police display dog was saved from choking to death by a quick-acting vet and a fast dash in a police car.’
    • ‘A woman has thanked the hero who saved her from a fire which destroyed the family home.’
    • ‘Three brave police officers risked their lives to save a woman from drowning.’
    • ‘If we want to keep on sinning after we are saved from the law of sin and death, He will allow us to do so.’
    • ‘Only the lack of policy comparison saves the First Minister from the outrage he deserves.’
    • ‘Can she and her ex-husband save themselves and their young son from certain death?’
    • ‘The agents preventing activists from boarding planes were assisted by the airlines.’
    • ‘All our people are forbidden from engaging in the activities prohibited by the Act.’
    • ‘It follows Barbara's decision to save a greyhound from being slaughtered in Spain.’
    • ‘As they work back through his memories he desperately tries to save them from being destroyed.’
    • ‘Anything at all that could be deemed useful in arms manufacture has been prohibited from import.’
    • ‘He spoke pityingly, as if saving a bewildered tourist from a cultural faux pas.’
    • ‘Supplies of serum were needed to save the isolated community from a terrible human tragedy.’
    • ‘The injunction prohibits Helm from using the name on his Website or in any commercial context.’
    • ‘I once caught a scarf in a lift door as it closed and only just managed to heave it free and save myself from a gruesome end.’
    • ‘The Robin Hood pub has been saved from demolition but its future as a watering hole looks uncertain.’
    • ‘In all fairness she is saving the children from a life of poverty and misery.’
    • ‘If just one child is saved from death because of such a law then it can only be a good thing.’
  • 9Indicating a cause.

    ‘a child suffering from asthma’
    • ‘It was nominated by people who have benefited from its work and seen the positive effect on the community.’
    • ‘The residents may indeed benefit from being under the wing of Croydon Council.’
    • ‘I want you to know that you may benefit from the love that an animal is capable of giving.’
    • ‘My vegetables will benefit enormously from this very kind and generous action.’
    • ‘They could even resolve the problems caused by emissions from their processes.’
    • ‘Some annuals are slow to germinate and grow and benefit from an early sowing.’
    • ‘The high number of deaths from cholera this year has exacerbated the emergency.’
    • ‘How are you supposed to tell if a neurotic dog feels it has benefited from its treatment?’
    • ‘Those who benefit from positive discrimination gain access, but not those who don't.’
    • ‘He has also benefited from being given a more expansive role under the Swede.’
    • ‘A Bill will be introduced to enable more young people to benefit from higher education.’
    • ‘This means 185 of the schools in the county are now benefiting from this technology.’
    • ‘Drug addicts would benefit from the tests once they decided to kick the habit.’
    • ‘They believe that these children would benefit from being in mainstream education.’
    • ‘During the late period of slavery attempts were made to prevent infant deaths from tetanus.’
    • ‘Changes in view throughout the film come more from chance events than any deeper process.’
    • ‘All we ask is that the owner provides us with some photographs to show that the tree came down from natural causes.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, the mayor's own tsunami fund is set to benefit from a couple of large donations.’
    • ‘Many small businesses believe they are the last in line to benefit from competition in telecoms.’
    • ‘Surgery is an option for the minority of women who get little benefit from medical treatment.’
  • 10Indicating a source of knowledge or the basis for one's judgement.

    ‘information obtained from papers, books, and presentations’
    • ‘Can you actually speak from medical experience to use this as a basis of comparison?’
    • ‘As far as I could gather from the local paper, all he does is take down, put up and modify speed humps.’
    • ‘We read that what's on and where can be obtained from the tourist information centre.’
    • ‘This information seems to have been obtained from file notes which were not made available to us.’
    • ‘You realise what you have got from it and can identify others at earlier or differing stages in the process.’
    • ‘Take the knowledge from the history of a thing and apply it to The NOW, to Yourself.’
    • ‘Data on birth characteristics were obtained from the Danish medical birth registry.’
    • ‘Their injuries were so bad that police had to identify them from their fingerprints.’
    • ‘He said he needed more information from carnival organisers before he could quote the cost.’
    • ‘Up to now much of your farming knowledge was gleaned from your parents and teachers.’
    • ‘The data obtained from the analysis of polar structure is illustrated in Table XIV.’
    • ‘She was allowed to obtain information from the patient and her medical notes.’
    • ‘Should they be more discerning about the sources they draw their information from?’
    • ‘In one case, a young woman was convicted of neglect on the basis of evidence from a radiographer.’
    • ‘I can say from first hand knowledge that there was not a player in his side that did not hate him.’
  • 11Indicating a distinction.

    ‘these fees are quite distinct from expenses’
    • ‘They were quite different from what she'd seen in the parts of town she frequented.’
    • ‘Further, this third genus is manifestly different and distinct from the second.’
    • ‘Barley Junction was quite a different station from the one I had left in the Suburbs.’
    • ‘Do you have any objection to being named by your name, as distinct from by an initial?’
    • ‘Indeed, why should there be a history of science distinct from the history of thought and action?’
    • ‘You may end up writing books which are quite different from what you intended to write when you started out.’
    • ‘This is quite different from Europe, where eating on the slopes will cost you an arm and a leg.’
    • ‘The position is quite different from that which appertained in the Ireland case.’
    • ‘Kant warned that enjoyment of beauty was distinct from other sorts of pleasure.’
    • ‘Here the landscape is quite different from the interior but no less rewarding.’
    • ‘Writers often differ quite widely from each other over ethical issues and questions.’
    • ‘It's called the cost of living, and it's quite different from the rate of inflation.’
    • ‘We started off quite a bit different from where we had been at the open test.’
    • ‘Is that not what is what is happening, as distinct from what is being said to happen?’
    • ‘One day, you could part own quite a different company from the one you invested in many years ago.’
    • ‘The whole place has been redecorated and looks quite different from how I remember it.’
    • ‘They are quite strikingly different from the faces one sees in equivalent circles in London.’
    • ‘How far have its actions, as distinct from its example, contributed to that end?’
    • ‘So the logical form of the second sentence is quite different from the logical form of the first.’
    • ‘Its quite different from the Sokal hoax, for lots of reasons, as has been pointed out.’

Phrases

  • from day to day (or hour to hour etc.)

    • Daily (or hourly etc.); as the days (or hours etc.) pass.

      • ‘Those with lupus frequently say they don't know from day to day, sometimes hour to hour, how they will feel or what they will be capable of doing.’
      • ‘His actual policies fluctuate from hour to hour and have the wonderful capacity to be whatever would suit each individual voter best.’
      • ‘The choice, he said, would change from hour to hour, from minute to minute, so don't consider it definitive.’
      • ‘How many shows do we see Gloria commenting on from day to day, actually from hour to hour?’
      • ‘Normally, property is all about location on presumptuously called The World, the location changes from day to day, and the sea views change by the hour.’
      • ‘Of course it waxes and wanes literally from hour to hour.’
      • ‘It is loyalty to ‘the cause’, however it is defined and however it changes in principle from day to day, that matters.’
      • ‘But one of the problems with this town's that there's very little consistency from day to day, month to month, year to year.’
      • ‘I have learned to exist with the pain and panics and live from hour to hour.’
      • ‘It has been a time of uncertainty about the future living from day to day, week to week unable to plan for anything other than the short term.’
      precariously, from day to day, not knowing where one's next meal is coming from, uncertainly, insecurely, in poverty, meagrely
      View synonyms
  • from now (or then etc.) on

    • Now (or then etc.) and in the future.

      ‘they were friends from that day on’
      • ‘Oil supplies would tighten and prices would rise from then on, experts predicted.’
      • ‘We resupplied our groceries and from then on provided our own kitchen staff and cooked our own meals.’
      • ‘I also had too many versions of one song in my head which also gave me trouble, but eventually I relaxed and things went much better from then on.’
      • ‘The list of weekly winners will be appearing in these columns from now on.’
      • ‘At the age of sixteen, his parents sent him for further schooling in the United Sates - a country where he lived from then on.’
      • ‘What it did to me though is it made me allergic to shellfish from then on since my body used all its anti-bodies to fight the poison.’
      • ‘His paintings from then on portrayed gigantic, sensuous and cruel women, with pouting lips, masses of wavy hair and columnar necks.’
      • ‘Williams started hitting some outrageous winners from then on.’
      • ‘Not that I ever said anything of a personal nature anyway, but I think I'm going to be saying even less from now on.’
      • ‘The Finance Ministry made sure the prime minister shut his mouth from then on.’
      from now on, after this, as of now, from this day on, from this time on, from this moment forth, from this day forth, from this day forward, subsequently, in future, in the future, hence, henceforth, henceforward
      View synonyms
  • from time to time

    • Occasionally.

      • ‘The atmosphere is chilling and symbolic imagery crops up nicely from time to time.’
      • ‘Chances are you won't get one, but I understand that you feel the need - we all do from time to time.’
      • ‘Place on a high heat and bring to the boil, stirring from time to time.’
      • ‘Yet any organisation must examine itself and the way it works from time to time.’
      • ‘We always like to hear of any other gardening tips you might have and will do our best to include them from time to time in this column.’
      • ‘The people who run it are hardcore music fans, they actually let us play there from time to time.’
      • ‘Sadly, having had to travel on the Tube from time to time, it doesn't happen.’
      • ‘Friday night was one of those pleasant surprises the Internet throws my way from time to time.’
      • ‘Although he is now fluent in Bulgarian, Matt still confuses the odd word from time to time.’
      • ‘Pack little surprises from time to time like stickers, a novelty pen or a joke.’
      sometimes, occasionally, now and again, now and then, every now and again, every now and then, every so often, once in a while, every once in a while, on occasion, on occasions, on the odd occasion, off and on, at times, at intervals, periodically, sporadically, spasmodically, erratically, irregularly, intermittently, by fits and starts, in fits and starts, fitfully, discontinuously, piecemeal
      View synonyms

Origin

Old English fram, from, of Germanic origin; related to Old Norse frá (see fro).

Pronunciation

from

/frɒm//frəm/