Definition of frisson in English:

frisson

Pronunciation /ˈfriːsã//ˈfrɪsɒn/

noun

  • A sudden strong feeling of excitement or fear; a thrill.

    ‘a frisson of excitement’
    • ‘Any kid who ever created fantasies of demolition with their toy cars feels a frisson of delight at the very idea of robot combat.’
    • ‘The game has an added frisson because of the opposition.’
    • ‘At exactly midday, the cannon is fired and a frisson of excitement runs through the small crowd of tourists gathered on the ramparts.’
    • ‘That said, it's a great show, mimicking its subject: vibrant, playful, yet betraying a frisson of menace.’
    • ‘This score may function passably within the context of the film, but outside it is meaningless, barely raising even a frisson of fear.’
    • ‘But this was going way beyond the seedy frisson of virtual voyeurism.’
    • ‘That would provide the frisson of fear which might otherwise be lacking.’
    • ‘As I put my hand on the sunroom door I felt a sudden frisson of fear.’
    • ‘When Kamal made his entry to the accompaniment of drum-beats, a frisson of excitement shot through the crowds.’
    • ‘But I still feel a frisson every time I hear the sound of car wheels on gravel.’
    • ‘Do you ever have a frisson when you look back at your early work?’
    • ‘There may always be a special frisson of excitement when you think of, talk to or see your friend.’
    • ‘I always feel a slight frisson when I cross over to the south.’
    • ‘While I don't think it had anything to do with the speed of my passage, it certainly adds a frisson to the ride in retrospect.’
    • ‘In the early 1970s a frisson of excitement gripped our family home whenever West Ham football matches were shown on television.’
    • ‘Talking about uncertainty is risky because the word itself may send a frisson of fear through many listeners.’
    • ‘Without the frisson of danger, however, Brown's illusion was about as compelling as a languid afternoon spent bending spoons.’
    • ‘The complete lack of a reply or even an acknowledgement sent a frisson of fear sharply through me.’
    • ‘One local told me that she cannot now drive through Dornoch without feeling a frisson of fear.’
    • ‘He also felt that same frisson of excitement he used to feel before the intelligence forays he had participated in in Paris.’
    tremor, wave, rush, surge, flash, stab, flush, tremble, quiver, shake, shaking, shakiness, shiver, chill, thrill, tingle, vibration, quaver, quake, shudder, palpitation, pulsation, throb, oscillation, fluctuation, waver, ripple, flicker
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 18th century: French, ‘a shiver or thrill’.

Pronunciation

frisson

/ˈfriːsã//ˈfrɪsɒn/