Definition of friction in English:

friction

noun

mass noun
  • 1The resistance that one surface or object encounters when moving over another.

    ‘a lubrication system which reduces friction’
    • ‘Any moving object on Earth experiences a force, called friction, which opposes its motion.’
    • ‘But the lateral motion reduces the rotational friction, so that the spinning persists longer.’
    • ‘The coefficient of static friction is typically larger than the coefficient of kinetic friction.’
    • ‘Space weather also has an indirect effect on satellites through increased atmospheric drag, or friction.’
    • ‘Drag results mostly from friction between the moving wing surface and the air.’
    • ‘You need to apply a great pressure to finally break the static friction and start the grease moving.’
    • ‘Less friction also reduces the stress imposed on the material.’
    • ‘The mass of the block, the applied force, and the coefficient of friction can be altered.’
    • ‘That slows the ball down because of the increased friction the ball encounters.’
    • ‘If it wasn't for friction between the tyres and the road, driving a car would be like trying to drive on an ice rink.’
    • ‘These substances reduce friction between the moving parts of equipment.’
    • ‘That will produce enough side roll to get the ball to hook once it encounters friction.’
    • ‘Minimizing the load carried by half the pistons and connecting rods trims friction and reduces energy losses to the cooling system.’
    • ‘Alloys based on tin, cadmium, copper, or silver are used to make bearings which reduce friction between two sliding surfaces.’
    • ‘The marbles are rounded and have less internal friction to resist shear.’
    • ‘Ponsse notes that this arrangement provides an excellent grip on the tree stem and reduces friction.’
    • ‘Light rail uses up to 80 per cent less energy than buses as it encounters less surface friction.’
    • ‘As wind passes over the water's surface, friction forces it to ripple.’
    • ‘After taping his stick, Huselius uses a sharp knife to cut the tape off the bottom edge of the blade to reduce drag and friction on the ice.’
    • ‘To reduce friction on the spheres, they are levitated by voltages applied to saucer-shaped electrodes.’
    abrasion, abrading, rubbing, chafing, grating, rasping, scraping, excoriation, grinding, gnawing, eating away, wearing away, wearing down
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The action of one surface or object rubbing against another.
      ‘the friction of braking’
      • ‘Naptha, often recommended, can ignite, just from a spark from friction or rubbing.’
      • ‘The models are simple in that they do not take account of the effects of multiple faulting, of fault friction, or of erosion.’
      • ‘Shooting hard can cause the cue tip leather to loose friction with the cue ball, causing it to jump rather than spin.’
      • ‘This is because the cue ball can pick up top spin due to friction with the cloth.’
      • ‘The breaking of the rope happened because of the friction with the steel plate on the pulley where the rope is fixed.’
      • ‘The marks are caused by the speed of the car as well as other factors such as braking force, friction with the road and impacts with other vehicles.’
      • ‘Divergence may result from friction with the Earth's surface.’
      • ‘The rash is most commonly found where there is friction with clothes.’
      • ‘It didn't heat up from friction with the skin, and it protected against hard blows and blasts.’
      • ‘The friction between my skin and the service weapon concealed at my waist became more and more unbearable, but I knew I was being targeted.’
    2. 1.2 Conflict or animosity caused by a clash of wills, temperaments, or opinions.
      ‘a considerable amount of friction between father and son’
      • ‘There had always been friction between my parents and me.’
      • ‘The best content comes from creative friction between program makers and management.’
      • ‘A ship carrying unknown contents fails to clue the viewer in to the urgency ostensibly causing friction between the characters.’
      • ‘There was further friction between the companies.’
      • ‘One other troubling situation she confronted was friction between the cultural groups.’
      • ‘Naturally, there is some friction between the young men, but there are some unspoken truths and tragedies that lead to the family splitting up, for good.’
      • ‘He saw the Commonwealth Games as a means to an end, but admits even making it to New Zealand in 1974 caused friction between him and his coach.’
      • ‘For the next half-century, differing interpretations of the treaty caused friction between the two countries.’
      • ‘Some of the scenes of domestic friction between family members are obviously written from recent experience, as they ring resoundingly true.’
      • ‘There were reports about friction between you and the mayor.’
      • ‘The Arcot House is different from most royal houses in the country as there is no friction between the government and this former ruling family.’
      • ‘But there is much friction between the five people on the base and the rescued explorer, who wants all the glory for himself.’
      • ‘There has been friction between the two agencies, mainly over jurisdiction.’
      • ‘The issue has been a source of friction between the two sides.’
      • ‘Despite the occasional friction between the old timers and the young upstarts, all the dancers come together for the old favourites.’
      • ‘This could cause friction between landowners and visitors.’
      • ‘All too often there can be friction between conventional farmers and organic producers, which is a growing cause of resentment.’
      • ‘The transition generated friction between the school's old and new staffs and hurt those students whose school was being phased out.’
      • ‘He also found tension and friction between those two over who was actually in control of the prison.’
      • ‘In reading this account, we come to realise that the fights and friction between different groups in the hospital setting are universal and ubiquitous.’
      discord, disharmony, disunity, strife, conflict, disagreement, dissension, dissent, opposition, variance, clashing, contention, dispute, disputation, arguing, argument, quarrelling, bickering, squabbling, wrangling, fighting, feuding, rivalry
      View synonyms

Origin

Mid 16th century (denoting chafing or rubbing of the body or limbs, formerly much used in medical treatment): via French from Latin frictio(n-), from fricare ‘to rub’.

Pronunciation

friction

/ˈfrɪkʃ(ə)n/